220871 User submitted reviews online!!
06/2014
rating [ 8/10 ]
We reserved this campground through Encore and the rate shown reflects a mid-week (S-Th) Passport America discount, a $3 daily "resort" fee (we're not Encore members), plus state sales tax. We arrived to the most friendly group of check-in folks we've ever met. The campground is well laid out and immaculately maintained. The interior roads and sites are all coarse gravel so no problems from tracking stuff inside, even during typical Maine smudge. Sites in our area are pull-in with full hookups plus cable on the correct side. During our four day stay in early June, there were only a few others camped here; the "high season" starts June 15. Sites are closer than we prefer, but with so few around, we had no problems. Our Verizon data card and phone service worked very well, so we didn't bother trying to learn how to connect to the Wi-Fi in the park. Restrooms and showers were immaculate. The campground is immediately off Mt. Desert Island, so is convenient to both shopping in Ellsworth and the features of Acadia National Park and Bar Harbor, on the island. If you like lobster, Beal's Lobster Pier in Southwest Harbor is the place to go. Small bizj ets flew over from the nearby airport during the day, but not an issue for us. We'd stay here again, but likely not during high season.
03/2014
rating [ 6/10 ]
An earlier reviewer commented on two types of sites at this park. We apparently got one in the "low-rent" side of the park as nothing near us is paved. The sites and the roadway are dirt and crushed shells, littered with live oak leaves; shoes must come off before entering the motorhome. The area is nicely shaded and so stays cool during the day. We are next to U.S. Route 1, and road noise at our site is evident even in a closed up unit. The park would be a lot nicer if the staff would just clean up the junk on sites. Out our window, we see abandoned sewer hose supports, an old washer tub, small chunks of concrete, etc. This county park allows for multi-month stays, so its safe to say that many of those here are seasonal folks. The campground is close to the Kennedy Space Center, the Warbirds Museum, Canaveral National Seashore, and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, so there is something for everyone. The time to be here would be for a rocket launch as the campground is just across the bay from the space center. Traffic is simply nuts here, and it seems worse than in other Florida urban areas. If we were in the area again, I think we'd look elsewhere to stay.
03/2014
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is an odd state park. I'll cover the camping sites first. All are back-in, surrounded by dense palmettos, pines, and live oaks. The "pad" is crushed shells and most sites looked level or fixable. Plenty of room on most sites. Privacy was good due to the dense vegetation. Restrooms were clean, showers were clean and private. For camping, the camping area was very good; no complaints. Now to the road. The campground is 3 miles from the entrance station along a road that wanders aimlessly through the palmettos and pines. I counted 56 separate turns in the road through a flat area between the entrance and campground. There are no spots to pull over on the road and nothing to do except pick up a trail crossing the road. But, with nowhere to park....The only parking in the whole park is at the small marina on a canal out to Lake Kissimmee. Without a boat, there is precious little to do besides 3-4 hikes. The park is 15 miles from Lake Wales and we chose it to visit Bok Tower Gardens. The nearest place to get a cup of coffee in the morning is about 3 miles away from the entrance station. There is a saloon across from the park entrance open in the evenings. We really like state parks, so would likely stay here again if in the area, but the road in the park was sure tedious; best driven as though on a slalom ski course.
03/2014
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a large, urban, well run campground, just full of snowbirds, the large majority from Quebec. Consequently, there are many signs in French and English. Since the park allows folks to stay in many sites for 5 months in any year, it's not a surprise to see people here for the winter. The roads and each site are paved and most looked level. Most sites are somewhat close to adjacent sites, but not objectionably so. Some pull-throughs, some back-ins. The park is neat and clean. Security is strong, with incoming and outgoing gates down much of the time. The park has nice recreational activities, including a paved multi-use path and a wood bark walking path with fitness stations. Lake Osborne is available for boating and fishing. We especially enjoyed the paved path on our bikes, since going out and back was 13 miles without having to ride on the sidewalk next to a very noisy, busy road. Many path users were from the local community and everyone was friendly. The only drawback to staying in this area (and not the fault of the park) is the sheer amount of traffic madness and red lights that abound. For those into equestrian events, the park is about 15 miles from Wellington. Costco is a couple of miles away, Walmart a little further. Great over-the-air TV reception. The county airport is next to the park and fun for armchair pilots to watch the activity. We enjoyed our stay here and would stay again.
02/2014
rating [ 5/10 ]
We found this site through Encore. Although we are not members, to call it a "resort" is too big a stretch. The sites are tight, with neighbors very close beside. The place did not have a "resort" look to it at all. After having no luck finding other places to stay in February, we took this one for 5 days. The park is on extremely busy Ulmerton Road in Largo. RVers approaching from the east should not count on being able to make a U-turn to get into the park on the south side of Ulmerton. Just west of the park, Ulmerton Road is under major reconstruction and the daily traffic jams are epic, to say the least. We stayed here to visit friends and see the sights in the area. The Pinellas bike trail from St. Pete all the way to Tarpon Springs (43 miles) was great fun and the Pinellas county parks were very nicely done. If we were to visit this area again, we'd likely look for another place to stay.
02/2014
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is a few miles south of Clermont. Once one gets south of Ocala, Florida it becomes very crowded. The multi lane highways are daunting for driving a RV with toad, but Lake Louisa is a nice respite from the busy roads. The sites are spaciously, situated around three loops, and all sites have electric and water. We had good over the air TV and our Verizon card worked well. Some sites are partially shaded, while others remain in the bright sun all day. The bathrooms are very clean and the showers are spacious and private. During our stay, nearby prescribed burns went on each day, leading us to occasionally wonder if the campground were in the path of the burn. The rate shown includes sales tax of 10.5%, reminiscent of RVing in Canada (apparently "Lake Louisa" can charge a local option tax of 3.5% on top of the state tax of 7%). For those who like to ride Florida's bike trails, this is a particularly good place to stay as the Van Fleet and West Orange trails are close by. If you ride in the area on a recumbent bike, check out Central Florida recumbent riders on Google for trice-weekly rides in the area. We'd stay here again if in the area.
02/2014
rating [ 5/10 ]
Some may find this "resort" to their liking, but we found it constraining and with "tight" spacing between units. Sites were grass. Add to this that many of the large Class A rigs were in their sites "backwards," leading to a lack of privacy in many sites. Someone else mentioned the laundry; suffice it to say that an advanced degree would be helpful to figure out the "system" they have to pay for the laundry. We decided to take our laundry with us rather than tackle their system. Our site, and plenty of others, had no concrete pad beside our door, just some shell stone like material. For the price we expected much more than this, but at the time we reserved, nothing else was available. This part of Florida is just mobbed this time of year with impatient and inconsiderate drivers everywhere, plus long stop and go lines to get to the barrier islands, even on weekdays. During our stay a caravan of very large Class A's arrived to stay. We watched one wipe out a neighbor's palm tree trying to turn into a site. These rigs seemed too large to fit into the allotted spaces in the park, plus they were often in backwards. On a possible future visit, we'd likely try somewhere else instead of this place; especially, given the price of admission. Anyone who does stay should try out Marko's Diner for a great breakfast. It is next door to the campground
02/2014
rating [ 9/10 ]
This very compact park is located a few miles west of Tallahassee, on the south side of Lake Talquin. It's operated by Leon County. During our stay, shortly after an ice storm shut down the entire Florida panhandle, we were the only ones at the park. The restrooms were old but clean and serviceable. The park is adjacent to a boat landing which is popular with anglers. The rate shown includes all taxes. Our site was beautiful, a pull-through right on Lake Talquin. The reservation process is informal, done via email with an email response from the attendant. Our Verizon card and phone worked well at this site, along with numerous over-the-air TV stations. We were interested in biking and bird watching while at this park and were not disappointed. The trailhead for the 15 mile Tallahassee-St. Marks State Trail is about 10 miles from the campground, and the national wildlife refuge at St. Marks was about 25 miles away; both activities were great experiences. There is a Costco in Tallahassee for those who are members. We'd stay here again when in the area.
02/2014
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is located near Niceville. The lots are nicely spaced, and each one is surrounded by a wooden fence to define the space. Some sites were on compacted dirt, others were done in fine gravel, and the handicapped sites were concrete. The staff and volunteers were very nice and pleasant to deal with. The rate shown includes the $16 nightly fee for water and electric, plus 6% sales tax. The campground is near Eglin Air Force Base, and on days they have maneuvers, the noise is RV-shaking. We also heard what sounded like cannons going off, but they might have been sonic booms. There are a couple of trails in the relatively small park. Our Verizon card and phone worked well at the campground. The bathrooms were clean and modern. TV reception over the air was marginal. During our stay in early February, many sites were vacant. The park graciously allowed us to have a package forwarded to us care of the park. We'd stay again when in this area.
02/2014
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a very popular park which was full over the Presidents' Day weekend. The manatees that can be seen in the outfall of the huge Manatee Springs are an attraction for day users as well as campers. The price shown covers the $20 nightly fee for water and electric, plus the 9% sales tax (the “community” of Manatee Springs charges a 2% local option tax beyond 7% state sales tax). The bathrooms were clean and in good condition. The narrow roads inside the campgrounds are compacted sand as are the individual sites, leading to tracking sand into the camper. In addition, the interior roads are potholed and rough. Our Verizon air card and Verizon cell phone worked marginally, and sometimes not at all, and there were only 5 TV stations we could get over the air. Apparently the park is in a “hole” as a couple of miles back towards town, the phone worked well. The map provided when we checked in rated each site based on depth, so many sites would not be good for rigs over 30 feet. We watched some larger rigs get into place, which was a challenge at the sites we could see. Seven miles into Chiefland provides the opportunity to take the 32 mile Nature Coast State Trail, a beautiful three-pronged paved trail to nearby communities. There is a Walmart and many other stores in Chiefland, plus a number of restaurants. If we were to visit the area again, we'd stay here.
01/2014
rating [ 10/10 ]
You couldn't ask for more from this large state park. We needed a place to say for a couple of nights and found this state park. Nearly all of the sites were taken by snowbirds from upper midwest U.S. and central Canada who were staying for extended periods. From October to March, people can rent sites for under $500 per month for full hookups. There are a bunch of paved bike trails in the park and plenty of golf courses for those afflicted. The sites are spacious, paved, and have full hookups with up to 50 amp service. Plenty of rest rooms in the park. We'd definitely stay here again if we were in the area. From Sunday - Thursday, a 15% discount of regular fees applies to all seniors, no matter what the state of residence.
09/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
We stayed here to visit the national parks near Moab. We received the Passport America rate of 21.49 (tax included; add $3.50 a day for AC) by asking for it. Our first site was a short pull-through but we could fit our towed on the site by parking on the grass. The neighbors were reasonably close, but not so close that their picnic table was near our sewer connection. For nights four and five, we moved to a longer site, fully shaded. The park is next to a horse stables that appeared to be used more for four-wheelers to run around the race track. The noise was not objectionable. The park was full during our visit in late September as were most other area parks, it appeared. The staff was helpful. Before we could see all the national park areas, the government closed down and the parks were closed. We recommend Dead Horse Point State Park for a day visit, for sure, as well as a drive to Potash alongside the Colorado River. The whole area near Moab is gorgeous. We'd stay at this campground again on a future visit, for sure.
10/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
We rarely stay at a KOA due to cost and our disinterest in most amenities, but this one looked like one of the cheapest RV parks in the Durango area. It's about 7 miles south of town, up a long grade, going by all the big box stores. The host was ready for us when we arrived and his partner drove us to our site, which was a nice back in with full hookups including cable. We ended up using our over-the-air antenna for the limited channels of interest to us. A person on neighboring property with a dirt motorcycle was a little worrisome but was not a problem. We stayed here to ride the Durango-Silverton train. We didn't try the internet as we had our Verizon card. The rate shown includes sales tax and is the single night rate. We stayed two days and would stay here again were we in the area.
09/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
If you want to stay in Fruita, get there early as the sites during mid-week fill up by about 11. Excellent and very diligent camp hosts were helpful in directing folks who were too late to get into a Fruita nearby National Forest parking area off the road a few miles away. Spend one night there and get to the Fruita campground early the next morning for a site. Sites are all paved and mostly level. Some are quite short, but we also did see some large Class A rigs. Tenters have sites intermingled with RVs, so reasonable quiet is mandatory. The campground accepts no reservations and is dry camping only. There are no showers but there is potable water and a dump station. The rate shown reflects the 50% discount for holders of the senior pass. The old community of Fruita was very interesting. While we don't anticipate returning here, we'd stay at Fruita again.
09/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
We chose this campground for a midweek 3 day stay in SLC, and it is just about the only show this close to town. The rate shown includes the daily rate of $47 plus $6 in tourist taxes. The weekly rate is worth it if one is interested in staying that long. The park warns customers to lock up their bikes and a quick look in the neighborhood suggested this was good advice. The tram across North Temple street is very convenient for getting to Temple Square and all the interesting things to see and do there. For cyclists, the Jordan River Parkway Trail is right behind the campground and leads to other trails for many miles of off-road riding. Many of the sites enjoy day-long shade from mature trees. Sites varied in length and our 30 foot RV plus towed fit comfortably in a 57 foot site. Longer sites were available for the same price. Cable TV did not include public TV, so we used our antenna for over-the-air viewing. We enjoyed our stay in SLC and recommend this site in spite of the high cost. The next time we're in SLC, we'll probably stay here.
09/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This delightful park is only a mile or two from I-15, 7 miles south of Idaho Falls. The park is operated by the county and has 12 sites. All sites are spacious, pull through on pea-stone gravel with grass in between, and have electric and water. There are trees for partial shade during the day. The single shower in the mens room was private, clean, and spacious with plenty of hot water. During our Friday overnight stay we were one of four campers in the campground. We will definitely keep this place in mind in the future when traveling on this route.
09/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
We were here for 7 nights. Because our rig is "only" 30 feet long, we were stuck in the smallest of the spaces in the whole park, back in, with the neighbor's picnic table sitting over the top of our sewer connection. These sites were very narrow and shallow and we had to park our vehicle away from our site. The big Class A's all had long pull-through sites. There was shade at most sites for parts of the day, and the weather was cooperative for the most part. Staff was very helpful and nice. The park is conveniently located in town, only 4 blocks from the Cody museum and one block from Sierra Trading Post outlet for those needing retail therapy. Many other restaurants, saloons, and retail shopping were within a mile or two in either direction. The park Wi-Fi worked well for the most part as did our Verizon MiFi and Tracfone. The elevation in Cody is just over 5000 feet, so plan for a little acclimation time. If we were in the area again, we'd likely try to stay in the more spacious sites at the nearby state park.
09/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a compact but well organized park. All sites are back in with room for one's towed to park next to the rig; this gives a nice space to the next RV in the row. Showers and restrooms were clean and private. Rate shown includes a 10% Good Sam discount, and includes full hookups, cable TV, and included Wi-Fi. We'd stay again when in the area, if it was as hot as it is today.
09/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park was flooded during 2011, based on the marks on the trees in the park. There is no other evidence of a problem. The restrooms and showers were clean and private. Staff was helpful; we were given a site close to the restrooms and showers during our midweek stay. A nice bike path goes into downtown Mandan. The infantry post, Mandan village earthhouses, and Custer home were interesting aspects of the park. We enjoyed our two night stay and would stay again when in the area.
09/2013
rating [ 1/10 ]
This park is closed for the season and camping is prohibited by signs. The web site for the park shows it as open Memorial Day through Labor Day. The park is across the road from a large refinery and BNSF railroad. This review w ill say we camped in a motorhome, but we didn't stay at all.
08/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
We sought out this park for an overnight while traveling west. It was one of only a few that were convenient. Take care in getting to the campground as it's a left turn off a busy multi-lane road with no traffic light. There is no sign at all indicating where the campground entrance is so there's another opportunity to miss it (the campground is next to, and behind the large fire station, and the entrance to the park looks like a driveway to a house). The rate shown included a 10% state tax plus a 1% city/county tax. Our site was good, level; Wi-Fi worked well. We'd stay again if we needed stopover while traveling through.
08/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
We had plans for a visit with relatives over a hot August weekend and decided to try this park. We're glad we did as the park is quite nice and very convenient. It's compact, but there is good room on sites. We had one of the few sites with some shade part of the day. Electric service was good on the site and the campground host was very helpful with biking information for the area. Wisconsin seems to love extra fees, so there are fees for nearly everything. $20 gets an annual pass for biking on any of the state's trails; the trail network around Madison is excellent and fascinating for its variety around and through the city. The park is only ~3 miles from downtown, so is very convenient for visiting Madison. The Saturday farmers' market around the capitol building was extensive and lots of fun to explore. The rate shown included a $2 senior discount, available to any senior whether resident or not. The $10 non-refundable reservation fee was disappointingly steep. We enjoyed our stay at this campground and will stay here again when visiting the area. We probably won't reserve beforehand, however.
09/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
On Thursday before Labor Day we were looking for somewhere to stay over the long weekend and found this park on RV Park Reviews. We called and were told that the park is first-come, first-served and that it was unlikely to be full on a weekday. We arrived mid-afternoon and picked site 8, probably the best site of the 14 electric sites, with good shade. By Friday evening, the electric sites were all taken. As good luck would have it, the other camper using the shared power pedestal only used a 20 amp connection, so we could use the 30 amp connection. The park is located right on the 55 mile Central Lakes paved rail-trail so that was convenient for us on our bikes. Also, the annual steam threshers' reunion at Rollag was only 50 miles away and is definitely worth a day or more. Electric sites are mostly back in. Although a big rig could fit in here, there may not be room for it plus a towed on the site. We saw a newspaper article indicating that the city will likely improve the park with proper restrooms (instead of pit privies), improved electrical service, and a dump station (none here now). We'd definitely stay here again due to the good bicycling opportunities.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
We arrived at the campground and had to wait while the campground host sorted out two earlier arrivals. Once we made it to our site, it was so unlevel that we immediately sought out the host, who of course could not then be found. We arranged an informal three way swap with a recent arrival who wanted to move to set up his satellite dish in the dense tall pines, so we were then level. That afternoon, the ranger graciously accommodated all of our changes. Sites looked generally short for big rigs, and the roads were tight, but we did see a couple of 40 footers in sites. The paper mill nearby in Counce smelled bad there, but we never smelled it at the campground. There is very little shopping for quite some distance so come prepared for your needs. OTA TV reception was minimal with a couple channels from Jackson, Verizon air card worked well, as did our Tracfone. On our second day, ongoing work on the water system left us without water for a while (and the need to back around the road to exit the park with the motorhome). This is a good, rustic campground for visiting Shiloh battlefield and the famous Catfish Hotel nearby to the battlefield (provided the wait isn't too long as it was last week on the 150th anniversary of the battle of Shiloh). We'd stay in this park again when in the area.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground is located at Fort Pickett, and is owned by the county so anyone can use the facility. Be prepared to show the guard your ID to access the fort. During our one night mid-week stay, most sites were taken, but we did see at least three available sites. Sites are located on crushed stone that the grass has largely grown up through. Our pull-through site was not level, but good enough for one night. It was a challenge for us to find the office for arranging for a site, and you should plan to contact the office by phone before it closes at 16:30. We had to call the office three times to get directions to the office and staff went outside to wave at us or we might still be wandering around the fort. The rate shown is for full (E,W,S) hookups. We could only get two TV channels on our OTA antenna, but Verizon air card was good as was Tracfone. We stayed here en route to Petersburg. There are few campgrounds in Petersburg so this worked for us, and the price was certainly right. We'd stay again if in the area.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
We spent 3 nights at this park, which is very convenient to Chattanooga, and we stayed here to visit the civil war sites of the area. The park is nothing special. Most of the sites are pull through, include either 30 or 50 amp, as well as water, sewer, and cable (although many over-the-air channels were also available). The daily fee shown reflects our Good Sam membership discount. The sites are in some very tall pines. A very loud dirt race track is right next to the park, and when there is practice, it's quite noisy. The campground is convenient to I-75 and I-24. A large Camping World and RV sales is at this location and is a good place to stock up on needed items or get your RV serviced. We'd definitely stay here again to visit Chattanooga.
04/2013
rating [ 6/10 ]
We stayed in this park overnight while traveling on I-81. It is just 3 miles off the interstate. Sites we saw were large, clean, and flat. The fact that the park has its own interstate exit suggests that the park is very popular in warmer weather. There were few others here the night we stayed. We thought the rate of $28.35 a night for water and electric was high for a rural state park. Also, the upcharge for each pet is outrageous, and we avoid staying in Virginia state parks for that reason.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
We picked this park to visit the LBJ National and State parks. The park is in a very hilly part of Hill Country and is remote, about 8 miles to some limited services in Johnson City. Campground is about 30 miles from Austin. All sites in the water/electric camping area are paved. The park was full over Easter weekend, but on Sunday many cleared out. Fee does not include the daily per-person $5 entrance fee which adds up quickly. A Texas park pass waives those charges and pays back quickly with discounts. All sites were back-in, many were not level, but subject to correction. The area of the falls were popular with day users on a sunny afternoon. We would stay again.
03/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
We picked this park to stay at while visiting the San Antonio area. But, it ended up being 40 miles from there, making for long days when we went into the city. Over the weekend the park was completely full. The park is about 3 miles off Texas Route 46, on the Guadalupe River which is a lovely, shallow river bordered by bald cypress trees. The nearest city with a full array of services is Boerne. Fee shown does not include the $5 per person, per day entrance fee as we had a park pass (well worth the cost of $70 in discounts and waivers of fees). Sites were paved in the water/electric sites. Many were shaded for the very hot weather the first two days we were there. We enjoyed a relaxing stay there and would stay again.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Arriving at Garner State Park is like arriving at a deli and a border crossing at the same time. After being told by a sign to take a number, you then stand in front of a glass door while reading that only one person in your party is allowed to approach the clerk. When your number is called, you can then approach and speak to the clerk. I suppose such an approach facilitates the park handling a large number of people coming to stay at this most popular of Texas state parks. There are six different camping areas in the park, some equipped with water and electric, all (apparently) with at least water, and apparently a few with sewer as well. Sites were well maintained and clean. The daily fee does not include the daily per-person fee because we had the Texas pass (highly recommended, pays for itself quickly). We stayed in the Live Oak area with water and electric hookups. All sites are paved and tenting sites have a large flat area of dirt that looked good for tents and stakes. The older area of the park is located at the downstream end of the park. Don't trust your GPS to lead you to the correct entrance as there have been at least three that we could see. All sites were back-in and looked good for shade during part of the day. Leakey is 8 miles north of the park for some limited supplies. We were at Garner for three nights mid-week and most sites were open at that time. By summer time, we expect the park to be full much of the time as it's only 1.5 hours from San Antonio and a similar distance from Austin. This park is in the thick of the Hill Country, so over-air TV reception was very poor and our Verizon card didn't work at all. W-Fi at the entry station was slow and weak. The Tracfone, on the other hand, worked well. People driving to the park would do well to avoid the extremely hilly and tight Texas Route 337 and arrive on U.S. Route 83 from the north or south. We'd stay again if we were in the area.
02/2013
rating [ 5/10 ]
This is an update to the my previous review. The rate for primitive tent camping is now $18 per night, plus the daily entrance fee of $5 per person. A $70 annual pass quickly pays for itself with camping discounts and the waived entry fees. There is a nearby porta-pottie but that's about it.
01/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
We reserved a "premium" water and electric site and found out that the premium site area is a large gravel parking lot with sites around the periphery and down the center. It's very close to the highway with much truck traffic. No shade, but the sites on the edges of the parking area have picnic tables with roofs over them. The men's bathroom had one stall and one shower for 24 sites in this area, which is 1.2 miles from the ranger station. Contrasted with this are some other sites, all pull-through, with full hookups and shade trees. I recommend you check out both camping areas before deciding. The tent sites are close to the San Antonio River, but the RV sites are not on the water. Goliad is a fascinating place for the history of Texas, with a reconstructed mission at the state park, a monument nearby to Col. James Fannin, Zaragoza's birthplace, and a Spanish Presidio. The original Texas Declaration of Independence was signed in Goliad. The Blue Quail Deli is highly recommended for lunch. Both that place and the Empresario are only open for lunches. The Hanging Tree is open for supper. Major shopping is available in Victoria, about 30 miles away on good roads. We'd stay here again when in the area.
01/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
On a mid-week overnight stay in January, there were few sites occupied. Many of the sites are very short and obviously not level. Some did not look correctable. Our initial site was far too short for a 30 foot motorhome plus car, and the staff readily changed us to a site we preferred. Each site is paved and includes a concrete picnic table. I did not see any pull-through sites or sewer hookups but may have missed them. The rate shown does not include the $5 per person per day entry charge; our $70 annual pass pays for itself very quickly by waiving the daily entry charge and including camping discounts. The camping area is nicely shaded by well spaced tall pines. The showers are very private with free plentiful water. There was NO TV reception on our antenna, but Verizon wireless worked well, as did Tracfone cell service. The park was on a boil water notice during our stay. We only stayed one night on our way south, but enjoyed the place and would stop in again.
01/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Each of the 67 sites is pull-through, although the sites are a little short for a big MH plus towed. This is a Good Sam park and we missed our 10% discount by not realizing that. Pads are concrete, and some are slightly uphill but workable. There is a picnic table at each site, but not much else. No shade to speak of. As others have said, a convenient shuttle will gladly take you to the casino down on the water where you can make voluntary donations to Ameristar on the slot machines, poker, dice, etc. We stayed a couple of nights to visit the national battlefield, well worth the time to visit and take the driving tour. The rate without the Good Sam discount is $22.50 a night, including sales tax. A nearby train track had frequent activity, but was down in a ravine and not objectionable with the windows closed in the motorhome. We'd stay here again if in the area as it was a pleasant location.
01/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
We stayed here for two nights so I could ride my bicycle on the Longleaf Trace, a 41 mile, paved, world class bike trail. The owner is on the board of the trace and was very friendly and helpful. There are 5 back-in sites on a horse farm with full hookups including cable. Electric service is 20, 30, and 50 amp. There are 4 other sites with water and 20 amp electric, plus tent sites on the property. There are horses nearby plus a bunch of beagles that, when set off, raise an amazing cacophony. The rate for full hookups was $22.50 per night. Narrow streets might dissuade large rigs from staying here. Bassfield is a tiny community with one restaurant and one fast food place. We found the location particularly good for the trace and would definitely stay here again if in the area.
06/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
This small state park is reached via some narrow and hilly roads out of Wellsboro. There are only about 6 sites with 30 amp service, and the rest are dry camping sites. The rate shown is for an electric site with a senior discount (do not need to be PA resident for the discount). There is one bathhouse for the campers. Sites were on grass and our site was a convenient pull-through. In early June, the area was quiet and very laid back. The developed overlook with views into the canyon is free and spectacular. This is an excellent spot to stay while bicycling (or hiking) the 60+ mile long Pine Creek rail-trail in the bottom of the canyon. We biked to a couple of pretty villages in the bottom on a stone dust trail. We enjoyed our stay and wouldn't mind staying again sometime.
06/2012
rating [ 4/10 ]
We thought Wisconsin state parks were the worst for piled-on fees, but this place takes the cake! (See below on camping fees.) We were charged two entrance fees, one for the camping unit (a motorhome) and one for the towed car. The guy with the pickup and an enormous fifth wheel only pays one entrance fee. They only charge the additional (motorhome) fee for one day of camping in the campground, and one entrance fee is refunded, but not the MH one. Go figure. We complained to management and noted that recent stays in two other NY Parks state parks did not invoke such a charge for the camping unit, to no avail. Meaning that NY Parks apparently charges differently, depending on the park. The sites were tight to get into and some were not level at all. Good space between sites. Roads in most loops were gravel and remnants of asphalt. Loops were differentiated by electric service: 15/20 amp service, 30 amp, or 50 amp, with each one commanding higher prices ($4, $6, and $8 for 50 amp). Water spigots were here and there within the loops but no service at each site. The rate shown in this review represents an entrance fee of $8 (not refunded), a basic camping fee of $15, $6 more for 30 amp service, $4 more for being from out of state, and $4 more for camping on a weekend. Talk about feeling unwelcome! Many of the popular views of the canyon are now obscured by vegetation, but the roads were enjoyable to tour. We will not return to this park until NY Parks gets their fee structure consistent from park to park.
05/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
The campground is a mix of seasonal occupancies and transient. We stayed four nights this time. Rate shown reflects a Good Sam 10% discount, offered by the clerk when I forgot to mention our membership. The campground is pleasant, with many tall cottonwoods affording good shade, with grassy sites, right on the Mohawk River. There are no trashy sites at all. Pads are level gravel, with concrete pads at each site for the picnic table. Some sites have E, W, and S, while others are W & E only. Cable TV at each site. We could not get the Wi-Fi to work at all, but our Verizon air card worked flawlessly. The park is convenient for using the river (e.g., launching boats from the marina) but the reason we like this place is the outstanding paved Mohawk-Hudson Bike Trail that is accessible from just outside the campground. The trail goes west from here as well as east, to Schenectady and then on to the Albany waterfront. The park is hard to find and is south of state route 5 immediately west of the end of state route 890 (AKA I-890). Walmart is a few miles away. We have stayed here before and would probably stay again in the future. Mosquitoes during our stay were voracious, so bring plenty of bug spray.
03/2012
rating [ 5/10 ]
This campground is new in the last year. Staying here was a mixed bag, so I'll give the PROs and CONs from my perspective. The PROs: Convenient to the interstate, less than 1/8 of a mile from it, all right turns. Convenient to a Super Walmart, restaurants, a cafe, and grocery shopping, all within walking distance. Manager was extremely helpful in getting folks in and set up. Pull through sites. Full hookups at a very reasonable price. The CONs. We were on the first site next to a large parking lot for the adjacent Best Western offering truck parking. At least a dozen trucks came swinging through the parking lot and parked for the night with plenty of noise until they shut down. In this respect, the campground was more like a Flying J overnight. The sewer was clogged up the next morning; this may have been due to the extensive rains. No bathrooms, no showers, just a place to park. About 75% of the sites were in use by contractors. All in all, it was a convenient spot for an overnight and the manager was very helpful in getting set up. We'd stay again in spite of the issues noted above.
05/2011
rating [ 3/10 ]
When we stayed again at this park last year, we were surprised to see the nightly rate had gone, in a year, from $20 to $35 for an electric site. The county decided to charge non-residents a $10 premium to stay in the park. Since we were set up before the ranger came by to collect, we paid for one night. We will not be staying again at this campground as the fee is simply not worth it.
03/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
The last reviewer's nightly rate apparently was the weekly rate divided by 7 as we were quoted $31 per night upon arrival, less a 10% discount for Good Sam. The park is nicely laid out and well managed by on-site owners. The pool was closed during the cold season, although daily highs in the mid-80s might suggest it's time to open it. A grassy 12-15 foot area between each site contains a nice lighted pedestal with electric and cable hookups. Each site is on gravel with concrete curbs to define the site and full hookups including cable and local phone. No picnic tables provided. There were two small fenced dog runs for guests' pets. Some long term guests, but rigs were in good condition and kept clean. There is an exercise room with a couple of devices. Laundry is open 24/7. Owner/managers were very friendly and helpful on places to eat and where to ride a bike. The park is just outside the Lubbock city line and is convenient to downtown Lubbock. Road sounds from the adjacent highway can be heard, but were not bothersome when indoors. We enjoyed a short two night break here and would stay again when in the area.
03/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
Any RV sporting a wind generator would likely love this place. The wind howled through (40+) on our first day there. The park is at a reservoir behind a dam, on the high ground in the Chihuahuan Desert, about 20 miles from Carlsbad. About half the sites can be reserved and the other half are first come first served. We did not see a single FC-FS site open during the four weekdays we were there, and no one flipped the reservable site signs to allow over night use the sites for one night. Accordingly there were sites that went unused sometimes. The sites are paved and have a modern picnic table under a metal roofed shelter with a stone wall to block winds from the predominant direction. Some sites were quite short; #14 is very long and has a separate car parking spot. We thought it was the best site in the park. Our site had both 30 and 50 amp service and plenty of water pressure. The barking dog at the campground host's RV was annoying. The dump station on the way out of the park is easily accessible and well designed. There are hiking trails to the visitor center and down to the water. The visitor center was intermittently staffed during normal hours. The gouges in the top of one of the speed bumps suggests caution when driving through the park. We didn't find any campgrounds nearer to Carlsbad that we wanted to stay at. We'd stay here again when visiting the area.
03/2012
rating [ 5/10 ]
The rate for this campground seems to vary by reviewer; we paid $16 a night for a 3 night stay. The campground is simply a large field with a crushed stone base. Sites are 20 feet wide, separated by some long planks. The wind blows through unimpeded by trees or other features other than some tall arrows buried into the ground. There were many open spaces during our stay, and about half the occupied ones appeared to be workers in the area. We didn't see if there were any bathrooms or showers as we had full hookups. Given the poor reviews of the other campgrounds in the Fort Stockton area, we'd probably stay here again if in the area.
02/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
It's a long haul to get to this campground right along the Rio Grande. About half the sites are first come, first served and the rest are reservable. The rate shown reflects a 50% discount for the senior pass. Bath houses were clean and there is a place in each one to wash dishes. All sites are dry camping with no hookups. The trees were starting to leaf out so we had some shade during the day. Liberal allowable generator hours were 8 am to 8 pm; a small portion of the campground is clearly marked No Generators. During our week-long stay in the high season, there were always sites available. Some sites on corners were pull through and the rest back-ins. Some people had cell service, but our Verizon data card got nothing, nor did the Tracfone work. Nor TV, nor radio. Visiting other parts of the park entails 20-50 miles of driving one way, but gas and other groceries (along with wi-fi) is available at the store in the village. We found this campground very quiet and relaxing and we'd definitely stay here again.
02/2012
rating [ 5/10 ]
Bentsen-RGV State Park stopped allowing motor vehicles in the park 7 years ago, and the RV sites are returning to the earth. However, the 10 primitive tent sites are still available to hikers and bicycle travelers. The sites are very primitive and there are no restroom facilities other than a portable toilet. Note that we did not actually stay here, but wanted hikers and bikers to know that this camping facility still existed. The state park is easily walked or biked and contains a large variety of birds for those interested. I am not sure if there is any additional cost for these primitive sites beyond the $5 daily fee per person to enter the park. Although this review will say we stayed in a tent, we did not actually tent camp at this park.
02/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
Our review of this park from last year is still valid. This year we returned for two weeks. The park was full during our visit, with many people there for the winter. The park is older but well maintained. The managers are very helpful and the occupants were uniformly friendly. There are two water systems in the park (municipal and private well), and customers are welcome to use all the well water they want for RV and car washing, which was good in the middle of a long journey. The park is 3 miles from Bentsen State Park and the World Birding Center. We'd stay again.
02/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
In contrast with the previous review, we did not find any of the issues that the reviewer did. The gravel road was not dusty, the gravel sites were capacious and well spaced, and the place was quiet and peaceful. The ranger came around often starting about 6:00 am. Our being there mid-week in early February, along with about 10 other campers, influenced our experience. Louisiana state parks charge a $6 reservation fee, even for people showing up with no reservations. The rate shown reflects the $16 daily winter rate plus half the $6 (we stayed 2 nights) fee. Louisiana offers reduced rates for residents of some states if the camper has a federal pass. The park is fairly new and the buildings are very well done. Since the park is in a swamp, the mosquitoes are a problem solved with some repellent. The campground wi-fi worked well, as did our Verizon air card plus the Tracfone. Plenty of off-the-air TV channels. There were plenty of places to eat in Abbeville, about 8 miles away. We'd stay again if in the area.
01/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
The park appears to be almost completely occupied by area workers with trailers and fifth-wheels. The park is basic, with gravel sites set close together. The park consists of two areas separated by a small pond. In our area, the men side of the bathhouse had a single shower stall and toilet. The laundry had plenty of machines and the price was only $1 each. Since the last review, the nightly price has jumped to $30 plus another $3 in tax, which we found too high for the quality of the place. The park was very quiet during our stay while touring in the area. We stayed here because there are so few places to stay in the St. Francisville area. The free Wi-Fi worked well, as did our Tracfone, and there were plenty of TV stations available over the air. We saw some TV cable draped over the fence, but did not have a cable outlet on our site. The owner, who does not live at the site, was very friendly to deal with, as were the folks we spoke with in the park. We'd stay here again if in the area.
01/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is located across the river from New Orleans but is convenient to the ferries that can take pedestrians across to Canal Street and into the French Quarter. Parking is available on this side of the river for a reasonable fee. All campgrounds in Louisiana charge a $6 reservation fee, including to those who simply show up without reservations. The sites in this park are nicely laid out, and the restrooms and showers are clean. Wi-Fi worked great in the park. This is a good place to stay to explore Now Orleans, PROVIDED you understand the challenges of getting to the campground. Traveling west on I-10 into New Orleans, Business 90 to the campground involves a hair-raising traverse of multiple high bridges, exit-only lanes appearing and disappearing, and curves. We suggest finding alternative ways to get to the campground if possible. Other than the challenges of getting here, the park is a nice spot for exploring New Orleans. The staff was very nice and helpful! We'd stay here again, provided we found a different way to get here from Business 90.
01/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is located on a small island on the water of Mobile Bay. The I-10 causeway is nearby and you can hear the vehicles when outside the RV, but no problem when inside. The sites are spacious and spic-&-span clean. The restrooms and showers were immaculate. The rate shown, $25.50, reflects a senior discount available to all over 62, non-residents included; otherwise the rate is $30 a night. Mobile is only 3 or 4 miles away. About 6 sites are pull-through; the rest are back in. A few sites are available for longer stays at $500 a month. Some sites are right on the bay. We only stayed here overnight, but would return in the future for a longer stay. We highly recommend this campground.
01/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
We stayed here a year ago, and the park is about the same this time. Our site was a pull-through so we didn't disconnect the towed on this one night stopover. A nearby bike path is great for exercise either walking or biking. The rate reflects a senior discount available to all (including non-residents) over age 62. The park is only a couple of miles from Auburn and malls for shopping. We would stay again when traveling through this area.
01/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
We echo the comments by the previous reviewer. The bathrooms and showers were very clean, but privacy was limited to a shower curtain. About half the park was closed off during the winter season; most of these sites appeared to be tent sites so closing them off was to be expected. There were only a few campers when we were there. We found this campground a convenient stopover point on our way south and would stay here again when passing through.
10/2011
rating [ 5/10 ]
Staying in a Wisconsin state park is like ordering from an a-la-carte menu: there are so many choices and add-owns that registration takes concentration. The park has 100 sites, but only 15 or 20 have electric service. Water is available at the dump station but nowhere else in the park. Sites were often shallow and consisted of piled gravel for a pad. Our site was damp once we stepped off the gravel pad. The road through the park is very narrow and the trees are close; we do not think the park is suitable for large rigs. This is an urban park, surrounded by residential areas plus the local high school. We were disappointed by the excessive charges imposed on non-residents ($10 daily access fee, $2 extra charge for the site, $5 extra for electricity--$29 total for each night), but the location is very good for visiting Lake Geneva. During our stay there were hardly any other campers staying in the park, even over the weekend. When in the area again, we will probably grit our teeth and stay again.
10/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
The campground is located among well-spaced mature trees, affording good shade below. The roads are narrow, paved, and the sites are gravel pads. I would say this is a not big rig campground, although a skillful driver could probably get into some sites. We stopped here for a couple of nights to check out the sand hill cranes at a nearby refuge. During our visit in early October, the usual fee for the vehicle was not being charged, so the rate shown, $17.34, was inclusive of all charges, including nice, private hot showers. We had good TV reception off the antenna and the Verizon air card worked well for Internet. We enjoyed the quiet of the campground with few RVs and would stay here again in the future.
09/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
This small county park is actually in McFarland, not Madison, but its close enough to Madison to be a good stopover point for visiting the Madison area. The park is a simple linear park with sites on both sides of the road. All sites appeared to have electric service; ours also had a 50 amp hookup. Potable water and a dump station are located at the turnaround at the end of the short road. Traffic is heavy on the nearby road but at night things quiet down. Restaurants and gas stations are within a short walk from the park. A boat launch is accessible from the park, but with an extra fee. We stayed here two years ago while visiting relatives as well as this year, and we'd stay here again when in the area.
09/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Sites below the office are nicely laid out with space between sites to afford some privacy. Roads were paved with gravel pads at sites. Nice trees all around for shade during the day. Our site was electric and water, and the rate of $19 was the Passport America rate good Sun-Thurs any time. The office staff person was very nice and helpful with things to do in the area. We didn't try the Wi-Fi but our Verizon card worked well. No Tracfone service until we went a mile down the road towards town. Good over-air TV reception. The campground is close to Baraboo and the Dells, so would be a good spot to stay when seeing the local sights. We enjoyed our two night stay at this campground and would stay here again when in the area.
09/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
Other reviews have called this campground "basic," and we'd have to agree. The sites were close together but, fortunately, not all sites were taken during our visit, so we didn't have someone cheek-by-jowl next to us. The office is only open in the evening on weekdays, so transactions are done without human interaction. The rate was excellent for full hookups. We stayed here to visit Bismarck and the environs and it was conveniently close to downtown. We'd stay here again for future visits.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
We last reviewed this park two years ago, and it's improved since then. A proper dumping station is now available, along with a station with potable water for the rig. Our Tracfone did not work here, but the Verizon air card did. We raised six channels on the antenna. In two years, the price for 50% senior discount has risen to $11 from $8 for an electric-only site. We like this place and would stay again on our way through the area.
09/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
Since everything except Jasper townsite appears to be part of the national park, this is about the only show in town for camping. There are sites for full hookups, electric only, and dry camping. In early September, midweek, after Labor Day, the full hookups and electric sites were full the four days we stayed, so reservations are a must for these sites. The full hookup sites are all pull-through; you enter from a small perimeter ring road and leave from an interior ring road. We found the sites nicely spaced, shaded, and enjoyed the full hookups. The single shower building was so far away, we didn't even try. We found two off air TV channels (still analog) and our Rogers cell phone worked well. Elk walk through the campground at will and the males must be avoided in rutting season. In addition to the pricey camping fee, there is a daily per-person required park pass of $9.80 for adults and $8.30 for seniors over 65. If staying in Canadian national parks for seven days over the next year, get the annual pass. The nearby town of Jasper offers basic services, but prices are generally very high. The town was crowded during our stay. As the national park has a monopoly on camping and development, we'd have to stay here if we visited again.
08/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
The campground is on Route 2, one mile from the national park entrance, and is a nice alternative to dry camping at the national park. We needed electric for the AC as it was warm in late August. The campground is located in the woods on a relatively steep hillside. Sites are well spaced, except that most seemed to be in relatively close pairs with good space between the pairs. The facility advertises "camping like it used to be" and this is a fairly good description. Most sites were short and not at all level, better for tenting than RVs. At the top of the park were some large (i.e., deep) sites for larger rigs. Most sites are back-in; we had a pull-through which was a wide spot in the gravel road. Sites are all gravel. Power was good and steady. Verizon air card and Tracfone both worked well. Lots of shade from the woods. Park is a Good Sam park and price shown reflected a 10% discount for electric service only. Park was generally quiet with no road noise. Whistles from frequent trains can be heard in the park. There is a rustic BBQ restaurant on site with delicious ribs. We stayed for 5 nights and would stay again when visiting Glacier National Park.
08/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
Campground is on Silo Road at MM70 about 7 miles north of Townsend (just before the double silos). Go east past the KOA and turn right before getting to the boat launch. There are two or three loops of sites in what is essentially a large grassy area on the edge of the Canyon Ferry Reservoir. There is a little shade from willow trees on some sites. The nightly rate for camping is $10 or $20 for a "double site" marked on the posts. Senior pass discount is 50% off those prices. All sites are dry camping. Vault toilets were clean. No showers. There were few people at the campground on a Monday in late August. There is a little road noise from the highway, but it's not objectionable. There did not appear to be any campground host, but we didn't drive all the loops. We'd stay again when traveling through this area.
08/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
This Forest Service campground offers senior pass discounts, so our rate was $5.50 a night with a $9 "transaction fee" for a reservation. This campground is a mecca for 4 wheelers, so be prepared for a constant din of 4 wheelers zooming through the campground. The sites are highly variable, with some not at all suitable for motorhomes, but others paved and level. Electricity is available at some sites, and some sites are held for reservations while others are first come, first serve. The toilets and showers were clean and enjoyable, as one had a toilet and shower to oneself. There are about 50 BNSF trains that come by the park each day, long coal trains eastbound and empties westbound. Train fans will be happy to be so close to the trains, but others may be put off by the train horns as it crosses the park road day and night. Sites are dry camping or electric only, with a dump station and water loading station available. We enjoyed our stay for a couple of nights and would camp here again when in the area.
08/2011
rating [ 5/10 ]
One might expect that reserving and paying for a campsite included the ability to access that site without paying even more. Such is not the case, however, in Nebraska state parks. When we reserved a spot on line (add a $7 reservation fee plus 2 sales taxes), there was no mention of the additional daily $4 fee per vehicle. In fact, when we arrived and checked in, no one mentioned the fee and we did not know about it until coming back into the park in our car. We did not inquire about having to pay yet another $4 a day for the motorhome. Our $26 a night electric only site was just about the lowest spot in the campground, so our site was all mud after a thunderstorm. There are plenty of actives in the park and the park is very popular. The Strategic Air & Space Museum is right next door and worth the price of admission. We will not be returning to this or any other Nebraska state park as long as costs are not clearly stated up front.
08/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a very popular local park. By early Thursday afternoon in August, nearly all the spaces were taken and by 24 hours later, the park was full. Most of the people appeared to be local folks staying for the weekend. Reservations are not accepted. All sites are water and electric, 30 or 50 amp. Typically there were two or three vehicles parked on each site. The gravel sites are very nicely maintained and as soon as someone leaves, the county staff could be seen raking the gravel and cleaning up anything left behind. It is very easy to drive downtown from the campground. In spite of the nearly constant stream of people walking through our site to visit friends or family on the other side, we enjoyed our stay at this park and would stay here again when visiting Cedar Rapids.
08/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
We stopped here looking for an electrical hookup for the air conditioning in light of the hot temperatures. The camp store staff was very accommodating in finding a good site for us. During a weekday stopover, there were many sites open, so we were assigned one with a nice view and closeness to a water spigot. Electrical service was all that was available, no water, no sewer. While we only stopped overnight while heading west, our site would have been nice for a longer stay. We found this a good place for a stopover on our way west.
03/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
We chose this park "blind" and lucked out. Our site had good shade much of the day and was spacious. Many sites had a concrete pad next to the parking location plus a paved walk from the road to the pad. The rate shown included full hookups and no additional charge for electric. Most of the people in the park appeared to be here for the winter and came from the upper midwest US or central and western Canada. Everyone was very friendly and welcomed us for our 8 day stay. The managers in particular were outgoing and helpful. Laundry was clean as were restrooms. There are frequent activities and field trips offered to guests during the winter. All sites were back-in. Some "super premium" sites had no shade, nor did the "standard" sites on the south side of the park, a factor to consider as it was sunny and in the mid-80s in mid-March. The atmosphere in the park was very relaxed. Wi-Fi was available at the recreation building but our Verizon and Virgin Mobile air cards were slow. The amazing Bentsen State Park and World Birding Center is just two miles south of the park. It is a must-see! No cars are allowed into the park, so walking or biking is enjoyable. Although there are many campground choices in the vicinity, we would stay in this campground again due to the nice staff and guests.
02/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
We were very impressed with this park. Some sites are on the beach (although half of those will be closed during 2011 as the park rebuilds the sites) with no shade or protection from the wind (but great bay views), and the rest are in the "woods," which consists of lovely live oaks and thick brush. We opted for the wooded sites to avoid strong sun and winds along the water and had a private site with no view of anyone else. We were surprised to learn that the park was full during the week of our visit, until we learned that three rare whooping cranes were staying nearby and a rare Central American bird was resident in the park. This park has, in addition to the usual campground hosts, "bird hosts" who conduct multiple bird walks during the week. The live oaks intrude on the roadways in the wooded areas of the park, but liberal use of yellow reflectors on the trees helps to avoid damaging the RV. It was easy to set up our satellite dish even in the woods and our internet cards worked well. The park leaves the Wi-Fi on at the entrance station for those who need it, but they have to go there to receive the signal. The price shown does not include the $4 per person per day access fee that Texas charges, but a $60 annual pass pays for itself in a few days with camping discounts. Rockport is 6 miles away across a long bridge. We'd definitely stay here again the next time we were in the area.
03/2011
rating [ 5/10 ]
This county park should be identified as being in Arroyo City instead of Rio Hondo. It is a thin 1.5 mile long sliver of a park located at the very end of Route 2925. The park was created by Laguna Atascosa NWR leasing the land to Cameron County to enhance boating and fishing on the river. There is no vehicular or pedestrian access into the refuge from the park; the entrance is 17 miles away. The park is narrow, wide enough to contain RV sites along or near the Arroyo Colorado River (AKA Herlingen Ship Channel), one dead end road right by the RV sites out to the boat launches at the end of the road, and a trail that essentially follows the road. Ten of 35 sites are right on the water, ten more have a buffer that anglers use between the RV sites and the river, and 15 are located away from the water. This is a mult-use park and there's the rub: on weekends the place is heavily used by anglers, boaters, and pick nickers. In spite of reserved signs on the RV sites, we found a group using our reserved site and had to wait for them to pack up and leave. We had to clean up the beer bottle caps and old fishing gear left on the site. There was trash in the brush next to our site, and the bank behind was eroded substantially between us and the river. There appeared to be about 40 or 50 pickups with trailers parked at the boat launches during the day on Sunday and these continuously left the park well into the evening. On weekdays, there were only a few campers in the park, but the anglers started driving through the park promptly at 6:00 am to reach the boat launch. The toilets were stainless steel and lacked toilet seats. The urinal in the men room still had butts in it on Monday morning. The cost shown includes full hookups. There is only one small store in the “city” of Arroyo, and the next nearest store is in Rio Hondo. If we're in the area again, we'd try somewhere else.
02/2011
rating [ 6/10 ]
This state park is unlike the two others we have stayed at in Texas. It is a piece of asphalt about 150 feet wide and maybe a quarter mile long, with parking for 48 RVs in close proximity to each other. The closeness of the sites reminded us of the many private RV "resorts" we saw in the area that were even closer together. As another reviewer noted, people can park their motorhome rigs to maximize their privacy by having the door not directly face other campers. Staff was very accommodating in allowing changes to site assignments. In our case, we were at the end of the park, so there was no one on one side of us. The park was quiet and relaxing during our week long stay and was full most nights that we were here in early March. The showers have no privacy at all for the dressing areas, but do have shower curtains between the dressing area and the shower stall. We did not like this arrangement. The campground is only 8 miles from Corpus Christi (and 14 from Port Aransas), and is a convenient place to stay while visiting or birding in the CC area. Activities while at the campground are limited; we walked on the beach most days which is only a short walk away. Dunes provide some protection from winds off the gulf. There is no shade on site but each site has a picnic table with a pergola over it, but on most evenings it was too windy to enjoy sitting out. Birding in the area is outstanding with many first bird sightings. Rate does not reflect the $4 fee per person per night that can be avoided by purchasing an annual pass for $60. The pass, with camping discounts, pays for itself in only a few overnights. In spite of the limitations of the park, we'd stay here again when in the Corpus Christi area.
02/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park is quite close to Lake Charles, but is delightfully remote in spite of that. The campground is along the Calcasieu River with a large pond (bayou?) on the other side. Plenty of alligators, deer, and other wildlife abound in this refuge. Most of the sites were back-in, paved, with a few pull-through with sewers. The park has some very nice trails suitable for walking or mountain biking. One drawback to the park is the nearly constant drone from the power plant a mile or two downstream from the park. We were there on a nice weekend (nearly full) and during the week (many empty sites) so experienced the range of occupancies. The park is popular for day visitors, but everyone was comfortably accommodated. We used the site as a base to visit a couple of wildlife refuges and found it good for that purpose. Price shown does not include a $6 reservation fee that is charged even if walking up. We'd stay here again in spite of that minor annoyance.
02/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Like most things Texas, this park is large, about 5,000 acres. All the camping sites are back-in, paved, and have water and electric, a picnic table, grill, and fire ring. Some sites were unlevel to the eye, but looked correctable. Sites are very spacious, with many 100-200 feet apart. You can't complain about the campground at all, except for one fact: the campground restrooms and showers were closed for renovations. Instead, there were trailer mounted restrooms and showers that a quick inspection revealed could use some more frequent cleaning. There is plenty to do at this park, including hiking, biking (on the trails or park roads), wildlife observation (many alligators, deer) and fantastic birding. The park was full over a 3 day weekend and is only 35 miles from Houston, so is a very popular day-use area. The park is very rural, with good shopping about 15 miles away in Richmond. There is a nice nature center on site, plus an observatory open on Saturday nights. The nightly rate shown does not include the $5 per person daily state park entrance fee. If you spend $60 on an annual pass (good for holder and up to 14 others), it pays for itself with discounts and no $5 fee in just a few days of use. People in the park were quiet, orderly, and friendly. Weather during our visit in mid-February was delightfully warm. We'd stay here again.
02/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
The park is located about 14 miles from Natchez, so is a good spot for exploring this interesting city and its architecture. We were in Campground B, physically separate from Campground A. There are some sewer hookups in Campground A; all sites have electric and water and the price shown reflects a senior discount. Nearly every site in Campground B is back-in. Each site has a concrete pad large enough for a 30-35 ft. RV. Our only complaint (not the fault of the state park) was marginal broadband access by three different vendors. Our site had an appropriate "reserved" sign at it prior to our arrival and the nearby comfort building was very clean. About half the sites in B were occupied during our visit in early February. The Natchez Trace Parkway is nearby and a peaceful drive without any commercial vehicles. We liked the park and would stay here again when visiting this area.
02/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
There are no signs on I-55 indicating where to get off for the park (Exit 98B), and once you do get off, the signs direct you to an entrance that is not where the campground is. Hint: turn right one stop light PAST where the signs say the state park is. The navigation at the entrance booth is unnecessarily tight and the 1.5 mile long dirt road to the camp sites is tedious and unattractive. On the other hand, the sites along the Pearl River are nice concrete pads for your RV. There were a number of workers camped at the park. Sites are back-in and somewhat short although we did fit a 30 foot MH plus the car on our site. The price shown reflects a senior discount. The park is in Jackson, so would be a good base for people wanting to visit the city. We'd stay again when traveling through.
02/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
One of the two campground loops was closed off this time of year. We were one of only two or three campers in the park, which is adjacent to the Alabama River. Our site was a "premium" site right on the river. The site is lined with crushed stone and is very large; we could have fit three cars or more plus the motorhome. All sites are apparently water & electric. The price reflects our 50% off senior pass. Standard sites are $14 a night, or $7 for senior pass folks. The electric service appears recently new or upgraded, with 20, 30, and 50 amp receptacles at our site. There was no staff on site when we arrived Sunday afternoon, so we completed an envelope and left payment inside. The dump station is conveniently located on the way out of the campground. This is a beautiful park and we would definitely stay here again when in the area.
02/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
This state park (an old CCC park) is only about 2 miles from I-85, but is in a rural wooded area near a reservoir. The staff inquired if we were using a satellite dish and assigned us to a pull- through with a good view to the south for the dish. Sites were a mix of back-in and pull-through. The price shown, for water, sewer, and electric, reflects the senior discount offset by an 8% sales tax (on food, too!). Each site is covered with pea-sized stone that drained well after a rain storm. The restrooms and showers were "early concrete block," but clean. We used this site to explore Tuskegee University and the airfield used by the Tuskegee Airmen for training in World War II. The campground was very quiet during our weekend stay. A nearby recreation path was great for a morning walk. We'd stay here again.
02/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Portions of the campground were closed off this time of year. Our loop looked recently upgraded and was spacious. The road through this loop is narrow, but navigable, and backing in was no problem at all. Each site has electric and water, along with a fire ring and a large, concrete picnic table. At a number of sites, there are gray water drains installed near the road for campers to use. The road into the campground is steep downhill, and the park itself is located on a narrow mountain road in the Georgia hills. There was a mix of pull-through and back-in sites. The trees were not too dense, so our satellite TV on a tripod worked well. Also, there is good broadband internet service and Tracfone worked as well. The campground is about 10 miles from the Little White House and a good location for visiting Warm Springs. The price reflects a 25% discount for "winter" camping. There was hardly anyone here in early February. We stayed here to visit Warm Springs, which can be done in a day or so. Although we don't expect to be by this way again, if we were, we'd stay here.
01/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
The campground is located a couple of miles off I-20 in a wooded area. The first 25 sites are back-in sites reserved for campers, and the remainder, largely pull-through, are for people with horses. There are metal corrals for the horses in the latter area. Some back-in sites didn't appear level to the eye. The restrooms were old but clean. People with long and/or tall rigs will want to drive carefully through the campground as the trees are relatively close. We were one of only three campers at the park in January. There was no staff present at any time and registration is self-serve. We found the place convenient for a stopover on our way west from Florence, SC.
08/2010
rating [ 6/10 ]
This campground is very large, 375 sites with 231 devoted to seasonal campers and 144 available for transient users. We arrived on short notice, the campground was nearly full, and were given a flat site in a parking lot backed up to the large community center. The rate reflects our single service, 20 amp electric. The campground is reached after driving by some large industrial sandpits dotted with bulldozers, as well as other industrial facilities. Signage on the road is excellent to find the place. Some portion of the campground appears to have been a sandpit as well, although there are some shaded sites that look like they were not. Pets are absolutely forbidden in this campground. This campground is located some distance from downtown Quebec city, which is a drawback. The campground is so large and the dump station is in the rear of the site, we opted to drive to the municipal public dump station a few miles down the road. We thought the place was OK for a night or two, but next time would look for something a little closer to the city. Wi-Fi worked very well, but cost $3 for each computer (plus tax) per day.
08/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is located on a hillside. The paved sites are terraced nicely, and are partially shaded. The sites are shallow, although parking of tow or towed vehicles on the side of the paved roads is commonly practiced. Although prohibited, our fire ring was full of trash. There are only two campgrounds in Riviere-du-Loup, and we could only stay one night due to an upcoming weekend of fireworks. The campground is close to Riviere-du-Loup downtown. We'd stay again on our way through the area.
08/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
The manager let us look at sites before selecting one. The water and electric sites looked chaotic and jumbled with people packed in for the weekend, so we selected a three way site, an easy, clean pull-through with a concrete pad next to the rig. Cable TV was a nice surprise. Most of the sites appeared to be seasonal sites, but they were simply immaculate and we did not feel like intruders. Wi-Fi worked well at our site. Turnover in the transient area was frequent. This is a good location to stay for visiting the Joggins fossil cliffs, a UNESCO World Heritage site. We enjoyed staying here for three nights and would definitely stay here again.
07/2010
rating [ 6/10 ]
We were first given a water and electric site, but when we checked it out, it was a very narrow site and campers from two sites over had taken up most of the space with their trucks and other stuff. It was a most uninviting site. Luckily, a nice three way hookup was available at the end of one of the rows for only $2 more, so we took it. The rate reflects Nova Scotia's 15% sales tax. Sites were mostly treed with some unshaded. The Wi-Fi was frustratingly intermittent; I would not say it was available. The RVs are packed in very tightly, many pull throughs ended up being back-ins as they were doubled up with two RVs per pull-through. There were some permanent-looking seasonals but a majority of transients. The bathrooms in our area seemed rudimentary. This is one of the few places to camp near Halifax. If we were to be in the area again, we'd try Shubie Park instead of this place.
07/2010
rating [ 6/10 ]
This campground is a portion of the former White's Motel and Campground as the seasonal sites look to be next door to this campground. There are some sites on the same level as the road interspersed with cottages and some down on the level with the Annapolis River. Our site, down below, felt like we'd sink into soft ground but we didn't. Our electric service was 20 amp and we popped the circuit breaker twice when using AC and another load like microwave. The Wi-Fi didn't work at our site and was intermittent when closer to the office. The lower level is a large open field. The sites in the lower field are on the periphery so there is a large central area for recreating. It was easy to set up satellite TV. The bathroom was shabby and in need of an upgrade. Showers were pay type. The pool looked inviting. Owners were very welcoming and helpful when needed. Price is actually $20 for a water and electric site with Nova Scotia's 15% sales tax pushing the daily fee to $23. The dump station is conveniently located on the exit to the campground. We spent three days here while we explored the Annapolis valley and the Fundy Coast of Nova Scotia. We'd likely stay here again when in the area.
07/2010
rating [ 4/10 ]
We needed a place to stay for the night and picked this one because it was close by. The campground is on a side slope down to a small bay or inlet, with terraced sites. Road in and out was very steep and potholed. Our site needed all of the blocks we had to get level. There are virtually no amenities at the campground, and the fees seemed overpriced for what you get. The office is in a garage bay in a barn that contains the restrooms. Sites are mostly open with a few in the shade; some seasonals but mostly transients. When we were about to leave, we asked where the dump station was. There is NO dump station in this campground. When we asked if we could dump in the sewer outlet on our site (we only took water and electric services), the answer was no; we could pay an additional $5 for one day of three way service if we wanted to dump at the campground. We would not stay at this place again, and can't recommend it to others.
07/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
We arrived on a Monday and were one of a small number of RVs. By Tuesday the campground was nearly full, so reservations are advised. Fee shown is for water and electric. The campground isn't much to talk about; just a place to stay but with nice views of the back harbour. Sites are all unshaded so we had no trouble hooking up satellite TV. The Wi-Fi was intermittent at 130 feet from the visitor center. Tenters from the tenting area needed to walk through occupied sites to get to the single wash house for the campground. The campground is an excellent spot to be for visiting the historic town of Lunenburg. No car is needed when staying here as the town is immediately below. Returning to the campground from town is a bit of a climb. Visitor center on site; staff was very knowledgeable. Highly recommend the Fisheries Museum; allow a few hours. Local churches are open to the public and have interesting histories. A two mile walking rail trail over to the far side of town is just outside the campground. Nova Scotia's 15% sales tax really adds to the bill for purchases other than unprepared food, including postage stamps! We'd stay in this campground again if we happened to return to this area of Nova Scotia.
07/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is another lovely New Brunswick provincial park. The park is situated on a hill and flat area near the beach. The sites are generally open and spacious, except some tent only sites are in trees. Some of the park has 30 amp electric service, there are a dozen full hookup sites (on top of each other), and the remainder are dry camping. Restrooms were immaculate, and were complete with showers and laundry facilities for a $1 per machine. The park is very popular with New Brunswickians and was full over the Canada day long weekend. The beach is right next to the campground and in early July the water was warm enough for people to be swimming. The winds were quite strong during our stay, enough to drive some tent campers away. The only drawback to getting to the place with a motorhome was the poor condition of Route 955, narrow, patched excessively, and very uneven. The eastern approach is marginally better than from the west. Regardless, we'd stay here again when traveling through to Prince Edward Island.
07/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
The provincial parks of New Brunswick are well developed and maintained, and this one is no exception. The office staff were unusually helpful in answering questions and helping with subsequent reservations. The sites are densely treed and spacious, with plenty of room between sites. The rate shown reflects a senior discount (for residents over 65 from anywhere) and is for electric service only. Dry camping is $2 less. There are 8 sites with full hookups. The restrooms were immaculate and modern. The park is located at a ski area that is a popular downhill mountain bike facility in the warmer months; ride up the chairlift with your bike and have fun coming down. The campground is just down the road from a Wal-Mart, Canadian Tire, and other stores, and Campbellton is only 3 or 4 miles away. We'd stay here again, for sure.
07/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is one of many campgrounds located in Perce, a small tourist destination. There are about 50 sites on the flat, treeless portion of the site, with the remaining sites on terraces down towards the water. The sites are close together, a common feature of privately owned campgrounds. The managers spoke some English and were very helpful in getting us settled and ensuring we were pleased with our stay. The rate reflects a two service site, water and 30 amp electric. We did not notice that this was a Passport America campground, so paid full fare. The restrooms and laundry were spotlessly clean. We enjoyed the boat ride out to Bonaventure for a hike over to North America's largest gannet colony where you can approach to within two yards of the birds. The weather was unusually cold and foggy the first day, but then cleared the next day. The area is worth a visit, and we'd stay in this campground again when in the area.
06/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park is a large, treeless, open field with about a dozen sites immediately above and on the shore of the St. Lawrence. The remaining sites are in a flat field. Some sites had 30 amp service, but others only had 15 amp service (and even that was shared between two sites). There is no shade on any of the sites, but given the weather, cold and windy, no shade was needed. The managers both spoke English, facilitating transactions. While this campground is known as Au Bord de Mer, the huge sign out front suggests a different name, that of a lobster restaurant plus camping. We drove past as did another group of four before turning back to the campground. The campground is on the eastern side of Cap Chat. The price, for two “services” (water and electric) reflects a 50% discount for Passport America; there is a two day minimum requirement for that rate. We enjoyed the sunsets over the river and would stay here again as we traveled the Gaspe peninsula.
06/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground is squeezed in between Route 132 and the St. Lawrence River, and is co-located (as are many others in this region) at a restaurant. The sites are grass, level, and look over the river. Sites on the river cost more than sites one RV removed from the river. Most sites are "3 services," meaning electric, water, and sewer. The sites are very close together and access for big rigs is quite tight; you'll soon be friends with our neighbors. As is true in much of this region, French is universally spoken. The campground is convenient to Rimouski and Mont Joli. There is a fish store adjacent to the campground. We'd stay here again on our way through the area.
06/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
This was a one night stopover place for us on our way to Canada. The site was easily accessed, grassy, and plenty large. Wi-fi was available at an additional fee of $1 per computer. A second computer was another $1 although we were not charged for the second laptop this time. Campground is on Route 1 but was quiet. We'd stay here again if we were in the area.
06/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park is located in the Saint-Jacques area of Edmundston, NB, and is adjacent to the Botanical Garden of New Brunswick. The park is immediately off Transcanada Route 2 that runs between Frederickton, NB, and Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec. 100 out of 150 sites in the park have electric service, but it is 15 or 20 amp service. Water is available from spigots in the park but not on sites. Some folks have hooked up long hoses to the spigots to provide water at their camp sites, apparently with the concurrence of the park management. There are some seasonal sites, and the RVs are new and very well kept; it's clear the management oversees these units to ensure they are kept up. The botanical gardens are next door and are worth a visit. There is an automobile museum on site. We enjoyed our stay and would stay here again if in the area.
06/2010
rating [ 6/10 ]
We stayed one night at this county-owned park on our way to New England. There was no one at the "office" so we picked our site and were visited later by a ranger to collect the fee, which included electrical service. Most of the sites did not appear too level. The provided map showed which sites accommodated what size rig and whether it had electrical service. Sites were generally spacious, located on a heavily wooded hill. Access for big rigs might be tight at many sites; the road, while paved, is narrow and winding. We think this park would be good for an overnight stop for people traveling on I-84 or NY 17. Fees on weekends are $5 more per night. Reservations are only accepted for the big weekends: Memorial Day, Labor Day, and July 4 when it falls on a 3 day weekend. Possession or consumption of alcohol is prohibited in the park; this message appears repeatedly on every building and in all printed materials. We would use this park as a stopover again when in the area.
03/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
This is a gem of a park in a fascinating area; I don't know how we missed it for two years. We had planned to stay 3 nights, but upon arriving added on two days. The next visit will be even longer. The sites are level and easy to back into. All sites are spacious. Those sites on the main loop are out in the open and those sites in the outer loop back into the woods for those who prefer full shade. The sites are gravel, but easy to walk on. A few of the main loop sites have full hookups; the remainder are water & electric. Virtually all sites are back in. Brookgreen Gardens, an outstanding sculpture garden with a native animal zoo and other activities, is nearly across the road from the park. It was opened by the Huntingtons in 1932, and was the first outdoor sculpture garden in the country. You'd miss so much to pass up the place. There are well over 1,000 sculptures in the gardens today. We took three days to see most everything there. Atalaya, the unique Huntington's home until the early 70s, is in the state park and can be self-toured for $1. We also recommend a guided tour of the Yawkey Wildlife Preserve on two sea islands south of Georgetown. You will not be disappointed to visit this area and to stay at this park. We will be back.
02/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
We were assigned to the Coquina loop and ended up in a site that was well shaded and reasonably private due to surrounding foliage. We needed to carefully watch the live oaks when backing into the site to avoid damage to the motorhome. We were able to set up the satellite TV tripod in the trees. The sites in other loops seemed better suited to tents or small RVs. No sewer hookups, but the three lane dumping station was a pleasure to use. The campground is only about 2 miles from St. Augustine. The history of St. Augustine is fascinating; we recommend the Castillo San Marco and the former hotels downtown, now converted to City Hall and Flagler College. Walking on the streets closed off to vehicles was enjoyable. We'd stay at this campground again when visiting St. Augustine.
03/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
It almost seems like a right of passage to stay at this campground, the most popular SC state park. As others have reviewed, campers should expect a quiet, relaxed campground with limited "amenities." Hiking or biking the trails, walking on the beach, and visiting the light house are all worthwhile activities in the park. Severe erosion from storms continues to plague the park; most of the rental cabins have been lost to the sea, with only 3 or 4 left. Shower/toilet buildings are a bit long in the tooth, but clean. Beaufort is 13 or so miles away and we recommend the walking tour of the narrow old streets, and for those who like walking in cemeteries, walking in the U.S. military cemetery is a moving experience. St. Helena Island, between Hunting Island and Beaufort, is worth exploring, especially Lands End and Fort Fremont, and Penn Center. We'd stay here again the next time we're in the area.
02/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
We were initially disappointed we couldn't get into the Jekyll Island campground, but as it turns out, we found this one to be a much nicer facility. We found that we had to call in order to make a reservation, rather than on line. Sites are large, shaded, and well laid out. The park manages the sites so that different amenities (50 amp, seasonal, etc.) are grouped together. The campground is situated well off the road, but I-95 can be heard in the distance. At the time of our visit, there were many open sites. The dirt roads in the park were potholed but we noticed that they were being fixed starting on the day we left. The price shown is for full hookups. The Wi-Fi was excellent with good coverage. We would stay here again when in the area.
02/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is the third year we stayed at this park and we continue to find it one of the nicest state parks we've ever stayed in. All sites are water/electric/cable pull throughs, but none have sewer connections. The sites are spacious and well shaded although we had no trouble setting up satellite TV on a tripod. Savannah is about 13 miles away via a limited access highway. Savannah is simply an exquisite city, a pleasure to visit. In the last half of February, the park was sparsely occupied, but by mid March it becomes quite busy, especially for the wildly popular St. Patrick's Day celebration in Savannah. The price reflects an age 62+ discount of 20%, regardless of residency. We will definitely stay here again when in the area.
03/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
When we stayed here last year, we commented on some of the sites being wet. This year was no better, and some of the water/electric sites weren't usable following rain. Also, the sites are close together, and the sewer connection for the next site is close to the picnic table. The toilet/shower/laundry building appears to be rebuilt and was clean and pleasant to use. The site is close to Charleston and reasonably convenient to the ACE Basin wildlife refuge. The Wi-Fi worked well at our location. The price reflects the Passport America discount for full hookup sites. We would stay here again due to the convenient location.
02/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
The live oak canopy, thickly hung with Spanish moss, created an oasis with protection from the sun and wind. The sites are all spacious and each is bounded by a rail fence. Sites are dirt/sand surface subject to muddiness in the rain; all are back-ins. Each site has at least 30 amp electric service, water and a clothesline. The above description applies only to sites 22-62, in the Amelia River Campground; sites 1-21 in the Beach Campground have no protection from the wind or sun but are paved and right next to the beach. A brand new, immaculate bath house was recently opened near our site in the River Campground, replacing two older facilities. Fernandina Beach has an historic district well worth an afternoon's walkabout. There are nice hiking and mountain biking paths that run roughly parallel to the main road in the park. Fort Clinch was reconstructed by the CCC in the late 1930s and is worth a visit, particularly when re-enactments are done on the first weekend of each month. This park is very popular and visitors are advised to reserve early for weekend use. We would definitely stay here again on another visit.
07/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
I reviewed this park last summer, and left some critical comments. The owner followed up and called me to dispute my comments. I was impressed that the owner would bother to find me and that she was very concerned about my review. While we did not agree on everything, I did see her point of view and with that understanding, I am re-rating this park here. This experience demonstrates that campground owners do read these reviews and do take them seriously.
08/2009
rating [ 3/10 ]
If you like being treated like a second class citizen for using your Passport America card, this may be the perfect place for you. Our initial assigned site was so obviously out of level to the eye, we asked for another specific one. They said that one was taken and gave us a different one. That was equally out of level and 20 lego blocks could not rectify the problem. Also the Wi-Fi did not work at all at this location. Note that these electric and water sites go for $39 a night if you're not a PA member. We were begrudgingly given another site, and managed to get nearly level using all of our lego blocks. The Wi-Fi barely worked at this location. Unless they came late and left early, it appeared that no one showed up at the site we asked for that was supposedly taken. Additionally, if you like the sound of many kids screaming with glee at the various play activities (there is a day camp facility at the campground) then this could be the perfect place for you. We prefer a quieter environment, but that is not the campground's fault. Although the park has well over 200 sites, most of them are seasonal sites. There are about 60 identified as overnight sites, very few of which were occupied but were not offered to us. There is a mix of pull-through and back-in sites. We were very disappointed at the treatment we received and would not stay at this place again.
08/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
We met up here with two other people for a mini-rally with our Bigfoot RVs. The sites are nicely spaced, and many of them have nice shade for part of the day. There is a mix of pull-through and back in sites. The sites are level and have full hookups. Our cost represents the Passport America discounted rate, freely granted. The park is very quiet and peaceful and although there are many transient visitors, there is no problem with noise. We would definitely stay here again, no question. This is a very nice campground.
08/2009
rating [ 5/10 ]
As seems quite common in this part of the country, many of the sites were taken by workers who left in the morning and returned in the evening. They were no problem at all, just meant that there were fewer sites available for transient travelers. Because the clerk could not assign us a full hook up site without her daughter's review (who was not available), we chose an electric site. That was it: electric, but no other hookups. We asked for the Good Sam discount but were overcharged nearly $5 for two nights. At least we had a nice site at the edge of the park and partially under some trees. There were five washers and five dryers, so doing laundry was easy. There is no dump station and no public water faucet, so we temporarily used a vacant site for these necessities. Toilet stalls are made "private" through the use of shower curtains in lieu of doors. It was OK for a couple of nights and quite close to the must-see Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.
07/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
There are actually nine campgrounds on this Bureau of Reclamation reservoir, the site of Lewis & Clark's Camp Fortunate. This review concerns the single RV camp that has hookups and approximately 50 sites. The sites are close together, totally treeless, and a little rough in appearance, but there were so few people camped on the weekend that the spaces were actually quite large. Most sites had full hookups, but a few had only water and electric. The rate reflects a 50% discount for the Senior Pass. In the late July heat, electric for the AC was a must if staying for longer than overnight. The boat launch at this campground was reasonably busy, although activity on the reservoir was very light, even on a hot weekend. This part of the country is big-sky spectacular and worth a visit. Particularly noteworthy is Bannack State Park, a preserved abandoned mining town managed by the state as a park. Although we didn't do it, also worthy of a visit is Lemhi Pass, the place that Lewis & Clark crossed the continental divide into Oregon Country. We'd stay here again when in the area; it's a great bargain. Although there is no WiFi here, our Verizon air card worked great at this location.
07/2009
rating [ 5/10 ]
Although the park is listed under Tillamook, it's actually six miles west in Netarts. The park is extremely tight, with little room between rigs and a tight turn to get into the portion of the park we stayed in. The roads were gravel and the sites dirt. Many seasonals; some of the RVs there will never go down the road again. The park appears to be a "fishing park" as some people had boats and talked about going fishing. As an overnight stop, we found the place adequate, but wouldn't want to stay any longer. The park Wi-Fi worked very well, as did the cable TV hookup.
07/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a municipal park operated by the City of Sisters. There are 60 sites, 15 of which have full hookups; the remainder are dry. Of the 15, half are 30 amp, and half are 50 amp. The price reflects a small senior discount, but the price differential between full hookups and dry camping was $17 a night. If it weren't so hot, we'd have taken the dry camping for an overnight stop between Eugene and Boise. The sites appear to be back-in but are spacious enough for a big rig plus car. The road is paved, and the sites have a gravel base. The sites are partially shaded. The park looks either new or very recently renovated. That is, except for the restrooms. They are old but serviceable, and really need some upgrading to match the rest of the park. There are no showers that we could find. The park is very close to the main street with a nice variety of restaurants and shops. There is no Wi-Fi offered, but our Verizon air card worked at the highest speed. The city web site says first come first served, but we found a couple of reserved signs on a couple of sites. Should we find ourselves in the area again, we'd likely stay here again.
07/2009
rating [ 2/10 ]
This is a very low end park, and appears that it hasn't had anything put into it for some time. The bathrooms and showers would have been marginal except for the risk of falling through the floor. There were seasonal (or permanent) campers for the most part, and a few of these units will never see the road again. The price we paid reflected the Passport America discount; we would otherwise not have found the place. It was OK for an overnight, but not for anything longer. There were plenty of other overnight sites, albeit at higher prices. Our Verizon air card worked well at this location; there is no park Wi-Fi.
07/2009
rating [ 10/10 ]
An excellent Good Sam campground; the price shown reflects a 10% discount for Good Sam membership. No gravel anywhere, just concrete pads for the RV and a picnic table, and a well maintained grassy area between sites. Spacing between rigs is generous, much more so than in some other commercial campgrounds. Full hookups are included in the price, including many channels of cable TV. Most sites are pull-through, with length sufficient to leave the towed hooked up. The park's WiFi worked very well, as did our Verizon air card. The site is about a mile from I-5 on a residential street and very quiet. A shopping mall is about a mile away. Tents are allowed but must be set up on the concrete. We stayed here to tour Mt. St. Helens and Fort Clatsop. Although we tend to stay in inexpensive sites like state parks and federal sites, this campground was a welcome treat for a few days. Ours was such a nice experience, we'd stay here again when in the area.
07/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park, in the Columbia River Gorge, is sandwiched between the noisy pavement on I-84 and the busy Union Pacific train tracks. The tracks are about 150 feet from the park and when the westbound train approaches, the first sound is the very loud horn as it approaches the crossing in park. The train will likely wake you up at night. The RV sites and the road are paved, with good shade and shelter from the strong winds in this area. 56 RV sites have electric and water, and the rest are dry. Each RV site has a screened pit for dumping gray water, a first for us. Each RV site is paved; 30 feet is about the maximum length of RV, although a couple of longer Class As fit in without any problem. There is no campground host, although a volunteer who lives at the maintenance facility does offer firewood for sale and fixed a problem with the electric service in the park. The primitive tent camping area is across the interstate from the rest of the campground. There is a day use access to the Columbia River; campers do not pay more to use it. There is no dump station in the park. Our Verizon air card did not work well here, with only intermittent connectivity. Under Oregon's 3 nights for the price of two, we stayed here for under $11 a night. Go to www.oregon.gov/OPRD to print out the coupon for the third night (Sunday-Thursday). The campground is first come first serve and is handy for exploring Hood River, kiteboarding and wind sailing on the Columbia River, Mount Hood, and the lovely Historic Columbia Gorge Highway or Trail. We enjoyed our stay in the park, and we'd stay here again.
07/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park consists of a large area laid out with over 100 paved sites. Most are pull through sites. There is no shade, but there is neat grass and flowers between units. The campground is very neat and well maintained, but the sites are close together. We stopped here en route from Coeur d'Alene to the Portland area; the park is a good stopover, although there are a number of seasonal sites as well. The free park Wi-Fi works but seems a bit slow. Our Verizon air card works very well at the highest speed. The price shown reflects a Passport America 50% discount. The only P-A limit is four days; otherwise the discount is good anytime. We'd stay here again on our way through the area.
07/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
This is a primitive park that has only dry camping (no hookups). While there are restrooms, there are no showers. The water spigots won't accept a hose for even a temporary hookup to fill water tank, although you can go to the entry station with your RV to fill from a hose. The loop roads are narrow, many of the sites have no shade, and the pull-through sites are right on the road and barely long enough for larger class A rigs. On a more positive side, the campground is immediately adjacent to the St. Mary visitor center and the Going-To-The-Sun Road (GTTSR). Generator hours are 8-10, 12-2, and 5-7, enough to keep the batteries in good condition. Those with Senior passes (62 and older) get in the park free and camp for half price of $11.50. There is a free shuttle bus service over the GTTSR that we much preferred to driving over this harrowing road. This road is a must see, however, one way or another. Our Tracfone did not work at all, but we had consistently strong signals on our Verizon air card. Strong advice to those going from Browning to St. Mary entrance in a motorhome or 5th wheel: avoid the extremely narrow, winding and twisting, up and down of Route 89 and instead take State Route 464 out of Browning. It's 11 miles longer but is a very good road compared to Route 89, is up on the high plains with gorgeous views of the mountains and plains, and relatively straight. We would probably stay here again when visiting the park.
07/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
This campground is located at the Hill County Fairgrounds in Havre. The campground consists of mostly back-in sites with a half dozen pull throughs, and is a good stopover point when crossing Montana on Route 2. There are a few picnic tables here and there, but otherwise it is a parking spot. The pull through sites have partial shade, but none for the back-in sites. The bathrooms and showers were immaculate. The campground is right next to Route 2, noisy during the day. A Walmart Supercenter is just west of the site. Train buffs will want to go downtown to watch the BNSF yard operations from the bridge overpass. They allowed RV washing at the site, so we made good use of that. We'd stay here again on our way through this part of the state.
06/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a very nice park. There are four loops for camping; first loop is first come first serve (we arrived Tues, and it was full by Wed. am), second and third loops are reservable, and fourth is "primitive" for tents. Sites have electric service but no water. We ran a 75 foot hose to the spigot to fill up with water, then disconnected it. Sites are spacious with plenty of shade trees. We were there over July 4 and were just about the only non-North Dakota folks there. Nearly every site had two vehicles, a camper, and often a boat. Lake Sakakawea is a very popular fishing location. Guests were very quiet, friendly, and pleasant. There is a national fish hatchery you can tour, plus the Garrison dam itself offers tours Thurs-Sat. Be sure to bring your camping needs with you as there is precious little in the area for shopping. The Audubon National Wildlife Refuge is near, as is Knife River Indian Villages NHS. We would definitely stay here again.
06/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
Like many communities in North Dakota, this city has a "campground" that surrounds the municipal park. The couple who manages the campground for the city were very friendly and accommodating. We were the only campers there during our stay. There are no picnic tables for the sites, but electric and water are provided, along with a shower and restroom building. We stayed here to visit the national wildlife refuges nearby. We would stay here again on another visit.
06/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
The park has about 10 electric hookups, with at least one 50 amp site. No water or sewer hookups, clean vault privies, with showers available at visitor center in restrooms. There is an unmarked opening in top of the holding tank for the vault privies as a dump station; you have to know to drive on the grass to get to it; no flushing water available. Campground has a bizarre reservation/drive up system. Our site was "reserved out" from under us, even though we submitted payment in the self-pay box, and we had to move. Drive up folks, pay close attention to the directions. Sites were generally not level, but could be adjusted to level easily. Some sites were shallow; we saw two pull through sites. Price reflects a 50% discount for Senior Pass holders (age 62+), making this a very desirable place to stay in spite of the limitations. Also, the views are fantastic. We saw plenty of white pelicans just below the dam, and a huge 100 unit wind farm further up the lake. A lovely scenic byway starts at the dam and heads south for 62 miles. We'd stay here again, or at any of the other campgrounds run by the Corps of Engineers on the lake.
06/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
We came to Sault Ste. Marie specifically to see the ships, and we were not disappointed. Although we were not able to get a waterfront site, the visibility from other sites was excellent. When reserving, you get a specific site, and the staff gave us a site with good visibility. The sites are reasonably spacious and level, grassed with gravel under the rig. There is no shade, but the rate includes all the electricity you might need for AC. No site is sewered; there are two dump stations for camper use. The campground is municipally owned and operated by a contractor. WiFi worked very well for us, with occasional delays. Adjacent to the campground are two boat launch sites and a recreation park. Although there are no obvious seasonal sites, some of the campers appear to come here regularly. Everyone was very friendly, both the campers and the staff. There is a nice path right along the river with park benches for watching the activity and chatting with other folks. It is only 3 miles to the Soo Locks where one can watch the big ships locking through; not to be missed. We stayed here three nights, logged some two dozen boats and ships, and would definitely stay here again when in the area. We rated the park a 9 instead of 10 due to the lack of sewers.
06/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
The sites are located in the grass around the various buildings in this 4H fairground campground. There is no shade and the sites are close together and not too level. There is only one water spigot per two sites, so be prepared to share your water connection. The location is relatively convenient to the many sites of interest to RVers, particularly in Elkhart. There are also Amish areas of interest, especially Shipshewana. There is a large amount of train activity as a major line runs right next to the fairground; this is not a problem for train buffs, but might be for others. We would stay here again if in the area.
06/2009
rating [ 5/10 ]
We're not golfers and were only looking for an inexpensive two overnight stop. The campground is a bit long in the tooth, as well as in the grass. In spite of an earlier review, there are still 10+ seasonal units, including one or two that appear permanently attached to the ground. We appeared to be the only transients over two weekday nights. There are no restroom facilities in the campground; instead, one goes to the pro shop at the golf course, a fair walk. The people in the pro shop were very friendly and welcoming. It took two bags of lego blocks to level the motorhome. We had electric available but for water, the nearest connection was on the other side of the adjacent site (50 feet). For mid-week golfers, definitely worth it, but for transients, the $15 was plenty to pay.
06/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
We stayed here for 5 nights to visit western New York and the Welland Canal in Canada. The park is largely seasonal sites with about a dozen transient sites. The campground is laid back. We were one of about 6 transient campers. The bathrooms and showers looked a little sketchy, but we didn't need them with full hookups. Passport America is honored, so the rate was $12.50 per night plus electric for the full hookups. For exploring Lockport and the multiple lock lifts, Buffalo, and Niagara Falls, this is a good base of operations. Don't expect too much from the campground.
04/2009
rating [ 5/10 ]
After having a difficult time with the on-line reservation system, we managed to get one. Full prepayment was required, two months before arrival. When we arrived at the campground, we found out what the problem was: over half the campground was closed off (early season? budget issues?). There were only 4 or 5 sites open for 35-50 foot RVs, and you have to drive around and pick one after arriving. The park is divided up by length of sites, and a reservation for one size does not translate to a different size site. We were lucky to get site G6, the best in the park with a view of Chesapeake Bay and the bridge-tunnel. Most sites were not level. This park is much better suited to tent and pop-up campers and there were plenty of them over a hot weekend. Note that each pet (dog, cat, whatever) is $5 more per night. We didn't use the bathrooms or showers, so no report on them. You can't beat the location for visiting in Virginia Beach, so we would stay again if the need arose.
03/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
This campground is better suited to tent campers than self-contained campers. The majority of sites are back-in with a minority of pull-through, and those were generally very small. Many of the sites are not level enough for a motorhome. Our motorhome is 30 feet and we got one of the few pull-through sites large enough for us (but did have to enter it backwards for the door to face the correct direction. I do not recommend anything larger than a 30 foot home at this park. This time of year there are very few people present, although on a Saturday with excellent weather the place was suddenly full for one night. The bathrooms were not ship-shape and the showers lacked any privacy whatsoever. The gate is locked from 8:00 pm to 8:00 am and can only be opened in emergencies by contacting a ranger. In spite of the limitations, this is a good campground from which to explore the Wilmington area, and for those over 62 (regardless of residency), the nightly price is only $10. Otherwise it's $15. The NC state parks are going to a reservation system starting in July. We will stay here again when we visit this area.
02/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is off the road far enough to be quiet, although the train whistle is noticeable. Some people actually like train noises. Sites are wide enough and level, not as wide as area state parks, but typical of private campgrounds. The park appears to be addressing an earlier concern of low spots being deep in water after rain by some earthwork to raise low areas. We stayed here under the Passport America program for nearly a week at under $20 per night. We had an initial site near a noisy afternoon party but moved the next day to a great spot on the "lake," which is more of a pond. The restrooms were immaculate. There is not much of a store, but Walmart is only 5 miles away and Costco about 8 miles. The park is close to Charleston with easy access on US 17. We like this park and will probably return here due to the convenient location.
02/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a beautiful park right on the ocean. On some sites, you could look out your MH window, and enjoy views and noises of the surf. Other sites were generously sized with space to one's neighbors, mostly back-in, but well shielded from the constant ocean winds. Although the park has 200 sites, a quarter or more of them were closed off, presumably due to it being the low season. All sites are dirt/sand so be sure to pack welcome mats. This park is very popular during the "high" season, starting in March. SC calls it their most-visited park. The bathrooms and showers were somewhat shabby but usable, and could use some updating. The gate is locked nightly at 8:00 pm but you can have the combination to the lock. Be warned that the combination is changed daily in the high season, so you need to get a daily update. We liked Beaufort and the Gullah culture on St. Helena Island, but the number of gated communities, some taking up entire islands, was a turn-off for us. The beach is a delight to walk on as the tides change the appearance substantially. We will definitely come back to this park.
02/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is an outstanding park. The sites are huge, and often nicely shaded from neighbors by natural vegetation. All sites are pull through, have a 15X20 foot raised, compacted, and raked sand surface for tents. Cable consists of 12 channels, all the networks plus a handful of independent stations, all watchable. We received the senior rate of $20 per night for being 62 or older. Wi-Fi is only available at the ranger station where people are invited by the staff to make use of the Wi-Fi there. A reservation means that a site will be held. Once you arrive and check in, you can then take any open site. We think this is an excellent approach to site selection. This is our second visit to this park; we'll be back.
02/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
Earlier posters have covered many of the features and limitations of the campground. I will add that, at this time of year the place is packed full, with many people staying for a month or longer. When we made reservations 3 months ago, we got the last site, shoehorned in between other rigs and trees. I think the reason is because 30 days, with full hookups and cable, is only $15.83 per day, tax included. We paid $25 a night for 7 days. The Wi-Fi is terribly underpowered, even though the signal strength is acceptable. About the only times I could get reliable Wi-Fi is from 4:00 am to 8:00 am. The staff, and especially the other campers, are very friendly. The campground is very laid back, as is the whole island. By all means, bring bicycles as this island is easily the most bike friendly place we've been to.
02/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
We stayed here on our way south on I-95. This is a very nice park. We had a FHU pull-through site that was perfectly level, with an adjacent concrete pad with a picnic table. All types of discount memberships are allowed Sunday through Thursday nights; we used Passport America for half price. The staff was efficient in processing us and accompanied us to our site. The park is obviously fairly new, but in spotless condition. We would definitely stay here again on our way through.
02/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
This "park" is Art's back yard at the dead end of a street. We got the last site on the day of our visit. Most of the sites appeared to be seasonal, as residences for the occupants. The nearness of an air force base and army base makes this a convenient location. Our stay was an overnight layover and we got the Passport America rate, for which there is no limitation. The location is a few miles off I-95, but we would probably stop for the night again.
06/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a nice quiet park, well shaded. The bathrooms and showers were impeccably clean. The staff were friendly and helpful. The sites are close together and the back-in sites were shorter than we than we usually have. The site is convenient to Monticello and Charlottesville.
07/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
We had a nice large shaded site and were able to get satellite internet service through the trees. Sites were level and spacious with no close neighbors. The gorge is impressive and worth a visit by walking there from the campground. The site is good for those visiting Hanover (Dartmouth College), Cornish, and eastern Vermont. We would stay there again.
08/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a no-hookup park. The sites along Spectacle Pond were close, accessed by a steep one lane road. Sites were shaded, and some had direct access to the pond for kayaks and canoes. We would stay here again.
08/2008
rating [ 5/10 ]
This campground is located on a steep drop down from the entrance to the pond (Sennebec) and consists largely of seasonal campers, with approximately 20 transient sites. We were there during "Hallowe'en" (in August) weekend and the place was overflowing with noisy boisterous campers. Also, the jet skis on the pond were very annoying for kayakers like us. Sites are very close together, compounding the problem with noise. We were there for 9 days but will NOT be returning again for the reasons mentioned above.
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