218896 User submitted reviews online!!
06/2014
rating [ 7/10 ]
This pleasant US National Forest-run campground is set in a wooded park near the Sacramento River. There are sites for small rigs, and pull-through semi-circle sites and some back-ins for larger rigs. Some have complained about the tight squeeze, which mostly means you have to drive over some grass to make the rig fit, but nothing too arduous in our experience with our 35-ft 5th wheel. It is a treed park, so only a couple of sites will get satellite. There’s no Wi-Fi or cable TV, but our Verizon 4G worked well and there were several TV channels that came in over the digital antenna. A gate to the park closes 10PM-6AM, so late arrivals should get the gate code in advance by calling the number shown on this listing and have them give you the camp host phone if they don’t know it. We had a pleasant stay, and it was a weekend, the only noise coming from a family reunion that took up 3 sites. The cost is $25 for RV hookup sites, and those with the US senior citizens or disabled National Parks passes get half off. That was confusing because signs say “Lands Pass” is accepted, which is the common $80 America the Beautiful” National Lands Pass. But, alas, no. They need to change the signs to avoid confusion; or I guess until they change the signs just take the discount and don't ask the camp host to clarify it like we did! The campsites offer water and electric (we had 50 amp at our pull-through that worked well, no voltage problems). We did not use the restroom/shower facility. However, the fatal flaw of this campground is there is no sewer or dump station. A sign at the entrance mentions a nearby fairgrounds with $8 cost, however, without specific instructions of where to go to dump we didn’t want to drive in and get stuck, so we ended up dumping along our route at a Chevron mini mart (found on sanidumps.com) in north Redding, 5425 Mountain View Drive, for $5 (free with $100 gas purchase they said). The RV parks in town were all going to charge $10. So, add that to your cost of staying here as well. A series of paved paths lead through a beautiful oak woodland/meadow in a loop, and along a flood bypass of the Sacramento River, which was dry when we were there. The main river channel also passes the park, and there is a boat launch facility where you can boat downstream of the large diversion dam. The paths total about 4 miles and allow bikes except for one nature trail. We rode the trails to the north trailhead, which leads to the quiet Sales Road that accesses the park, and then rode on sidewalks across the flood channel, I-5 and the main channel (a scenic view from that bridge) into historic Red Bluff. It’s a very pleasant town, with restored shops on Main Street, and a few blocks of Victorians on Washington Street. We rode along the river for a bit in the Red Bluff City Park, and up a stream channel, doing a loop through downtown, for a total of about 10 miles including the park trails. All in all, we would return, but it’s not the deal that we were hoping for based on other reviews, especially taking into account the cost of dumping elsewhere.
02/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
We stayed here last year and the power so was poor that we couldn't use it. This year they claim to have taken care of the power surges, so we tried it again, and we had a very good experience on our overnight stay. The Wi-Fi worked well also. At $27 (AAA rate incl tax) it is a good stopover place and during the months when they take Passport America (one night only) it would be a fantastic deal for a park like this. There is a section dedicated for overnight pull throughs. It is toward the west end of this huge park, and there are nice views of the surrounding mountains and desert. Sites have no tables or grills, just gravel drives with a concrete pad. It has a nice, mellow, safe feel to it. We'll be staying here routinely now on our trips through the area. An 8 rating is about as high as a park like this gets in our book. We prefer the more scenic parks.
03/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
The park is conveniently located on the north side of Mission Bay, off of I-5, but far enough away to not have excessive traffic noise. Freight trains can be heard vibrating in the distance, but it’s nothing like another local RV park. It’s a huge parking lot broken up by planted trees at each site. The trees didn’t impact our fixed satellite but could in other sites. There are no amenities such as pool or spa, just two shower/restroom buildings and a snack shack. Friendly security guards at the front gate will open it for you, otherwise it requires a key card if they are not in the booth, perhaps later at night. It doesn’t seem like a dangerous area, although there are a lot of homeless people wandering around Mission Bay. Across the access road (outside of the security gate) is a swimming beach and boat ramp, but around the bend is a new sewage pump station (not sure of treatment level). Many reviewers have mentioned the strict rules, which we don’t mind, it keeps a park nice. However, our fresh water connection chose the wrong park to spring a small drip leak. Security came over (after a puddle had accumulated on the second day) and turned off our water. They followed up with a phone call and told us: “Water is not allowed to hit the ground here.” We improved it and put a bucket under the area. We kept our black water closed off while we were here. If you spill any there is a $50 charge to clean it up since the sewer outlets are raised, so it would be difficult to adequately clean it up yourself. We found the striped-off sites to be adequately sized. The water and electric is behind the adjacent site, but sewer is more in the center of the site. They told us they try to stagger rigs if not crowded, which is a good practice. When we were here though, tree trimming on half the grounds forced us all in one section, which was OK. You can pay $75 to $90 to have a great view of Mission Bay and sunsets (if you have a rear view that is, sites are strictly back-in so motorhomes are out of luck). Or $65-$75 to view the Bay on the other side facing east (same problem with motorhomes). We used Passport America, (Valid Mon-Thurs in winter, no reservations) and paid around $27 with tax. PA sites are only available in the vast interior, although upon checking in, you can hike in (not drive!) and look around for a site that may have a peek view of something. We were here for the easy scenic cycling, though. We love cycling around Mission Bay, and the campground is right next to the East Mission Bay segments of the trail. The west side trails are much better, but you can ride to there too, or all around the bay in 16 miles. If the Rose Creek bike bridge is ever completed to the west of Mission Bay RV, the location of this campground will rival the other Bay park, which for now is a 15-minute ride closer to the fabulous western sections of the bay bike trails. There is even a wide bike trail that winds around the peninsula where this campground is located, good for families. We stayed for three days and rode every day, returning to our rig that had all the necessary hookups working great, even the free WiFi. We will definitely be back if they maintain the Passport America deal. By our standards (we like scenery and large sites) the camp gets a 6, but because of the great location and the Passport America opportunity, it goes up to an 8. If you can afford the view sites, you may just give it a 10.
01/2011
rating [ 3/10 ]
We had high hopes for this park as a stopover, and they keep a lot of sites open for that purpose. It is a large, nicely laid out park with lots of palm trees and a smattering of native fauna and views of some mountains in the distance. The sites are gravel with a concrete living pad but no tables. We were greeted after hours by a friendly gentleman who led us to an overnight end site and registered us and turned on the 50 amp service. All was fine, until BOOM the power tripped off when we tried to use the microwave. We have a sophisticated power management system that protects the coach from high voltage and power surges. After turning everything off except for the TV, the surges continued to trip the system several times. Since the incoming voltage did in fact read higher than normal, we had to disconnect from the power, which ruined our evening. The same gentleman who had registered us drove by and responded that this has not happened before and it must be our rig's problem. This had only happened to us once before in about 14 solid months in this rig and at that public park they admitted to high voltage. So, be warned, especially if you don't have a system that protects you from high voltage and surges. Unfortunately we can't come back here.
10/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
I'm glad I ignored the other reviews. We had no problem with this park for an overnight en route stay, especially for the $15 Passport America rate. We got a long pull-through site (in an area separate from the full-timers), 50 amp, full hookup w/ basic cable, free Wi-Fi (worked well for email and light browsing) and from sites 3-5 Dish rooftop satellite should work. It is convenient to I-5 and quiet, in a valley surrounded by treed hillsides. The host was helpful and friendly. Kids were playing. It's run down and not a campground we'd like to hang out at, but would stay overnight again for the Passport rate.
10/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
The rate reflects weekday, Passport America, for a 30 amp site (50 amp is more). A great I-5 stopover with easy pull-throughs. The sites are a bit close together but not bad. I liked the trees planted around that were pretty with fall foliage, but not tall enough (yet) to block our roof satellite. Overnighters are in the back section with a better chance for reception, or plug in to their extended cable. The yellow barn office is a nice touch, and the drive-in movie would have been fun if playing that night. Wi-Fi worked well. The park has a good feeling about it, and I would definitely stay here again.
02/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
We stayed here because of its good en-route location, and its Passport America Rate. Upon check in I was informed that the $12+tax rate is charged to all now. Although the property looks terrible from the road (they really should do something about that to avoid scaring people off), and the office/store is dingy and smoky, it turned out to be a good place to stay. Sites are gravel and level, and we had a nice view of snow covered mountains and rural ranch land. The manager directed us to the middle row, halfway back for the best wifi reception, and we were delighted that the free wifi worked great during our two-night stay, that we shared with only a handful of rigs on a holiday weekend. The 50 amps and full hookups worked fine, and our Dish satellite came in with no problem. There are no tables or fire pits. We did not use the facilities, but the laundry room looked OK. A nearby active railroad line created loud noise, but since there were no whistles or switching, it did not disturb our sleep, nor did nearby I-10. Bowie is pretty much a ghost town, so you’ll have to go to Lordsburg or Willcox, 25 miles in either direction, for food. Bowie is the closest access point to the Fort Bowie National Historic Site (ruins) trail head, about 14 miles from Mountain View. It is an excellent 3-mile round trip hike. Make sure to take the ridge route on the return. From the trail head you can continue on the unpaved road to Highway 186 and amazing Chiricahua National Monument for more great hiking, and loop back through Willcox for dinner for a great full day. We enjoyed Big Tex BBQ in the old town railroad car. Willcox has a lot of amenities, which is probably why the RV parks there are full while this one is virtually empty. For the price, I would stay here again.
02/2009
rating [ 6/10 ]
This campground is located at the southern extremity of the city of Carlsbad in a commercial area. From here it’s a good half hour’s drive south to the Caverns. A Super Walmart is a few minutes drive to the north, and an RV service center is adjacent. The park seemed to be mostly full of extended stay campers when we were here, with just a few open sites available for overnighters. We assume that since we were Passport America customers, we were given the worst sites, adjacent to the office and a trash dumpster. The sites are criminally close together, but luckily we were given two sites (12 and 14) with 13 left vacant in between. These sites are dirt and gravel, with no table or grill, no cable TV and only 30 amp. Our goal was to tour the caverns, so the fact that we were close to the (free) wifi transmitter made it worthwhile. The wifi was fairly slow speed and was down one of our two nights. I would not want to stay in these sites longer than absolutely necessary. Some of the other sites around the park were a tad nicer, with even some dead grass next to them. There are lots of places to walk dogs, but our friends with a dog reported they were disgusting since it seems that no one picks up after their pets. The park does have facilities to offer: a small indoor pool which seemed clean, a games room and arcade with pool table, a store, free coffee, a large DVD rental library (1st one free, $1 thereafter), swings for kids, and more. Our Dish satellite came in, but in summer when the trees have leaves some sites may have problems with that. The other option besides WalMart for camping and seeing the caverns is the campground at Whites City, at the entrance of the 8-mile access road to the caverns. That camp cost around $27, and offered wifi only in the office, a long walk from the campground. The campground was more aesthetically pleasing than this one, although the rigs appeared to be amongst utility lines. I would consider staying here again at the Passport rate while touring the Caverns. Once you get home from the caverns, this camp has more amenities to offer close by in Carlsbad
02/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is the nicest of the private RV parks in the Fort Davis area, much nicer than Overland Trail. At the $14 Passport America rate, including free wifi, it was an amazing deal. The park is for sale, so beware of policy changes. Spots are level spacious gravel pull-throughs, with covered picnic tables and bbq grills in the grassy areas between sites. The 50 amps worked well, as did the wifi. Views are of the surrounding high desert countryside with mountain views, about 3/4-mile south of the quaint historic town, which you can ride your bike to via a flat bike trail. Deer and javalina frequent the campground, so pet owners need to beware. There are no large trees, so satellite comes in fine. They also offer free cable TV. Facilities are very nice and new, although there are only two washers and dryers, and four private bathrooms with nice stone showers. A common room has a big screen TV where they have occasional events. The manager at the time was extremely friendly and helpful. It’s a nice campground to spend some time at and tour the area.
02/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground in Rio Grande Village has the only hookups within Big Bend National Park, and they charge a premium for the privilege. If you have a rig over 24 feet in length, the only options I am aware of are this campground and the adjacent campground, which has no hookups. Rio Grande Village contains a visitors center and a small store with gas pumps (no diesel), a few washers and dryers, and pay showers that were dirty during our stay. RV camping consists of a converted parking lot near the store (check in there), with back in sites on either side. As others have noted, depending on your rig and who is already situated, you may have a difficult, or even impossible time getting into your site, and they do not offer refunds. We had no problem with our 34-foot motorhome, but the driver of a 30-foot trailer tried 4 different sites before getting into one, and they were lucky that so many sites were open. Sites are wide enough for your rig and tow vehicle next to it. The sewer is to the left against the curb, and the electric and water are about ten feet past the curb in the grass area. There are no picnic tables or fire rings, however, there is a very pleasant area with grass and some trees surrounding the RV parking lot where you can set up your own table, with beautiful mountains visible in the distance. Trailers with a rear window will have a pleasant view, but motorhomes sit facing each other. We opted to face the opposite way in our motorhome to enjoy the view, requiring an extension for our electric, and no sewer connection for our two-night stay. Our Dish satellite came in (they recommended the north row for that), but not Verizon cell phone. There are pay phones at the store and visitors center. There is no wifi. The closest wifi seems to be at Chisos Lodge. Next to the campground is a dead-end paved road that leads in about 0.7 mile to a picnic area and trailhead for a viewpoint and another 2.8-mile trail to the hot springs. The little-used paved road is nice to stroll or bike on. Pet owners watch for coyotes here. In the other direction the road leads to the main Rio Grande Village campground. It is half the cost, and gets the most usage. When I cycled through there I heard the loud whirring of generators from most of the sites (allowed until 8pm), which turned me off to the place. Sites are more park like there with picnic tables and fire rings, but I did not find the campground especially scenic, and the main asset of the park, a boardwalk nature trail to the river, had been destroyed in the big September 2008 flood. Since I don’t care about having a campfire, I actually preferred the ambiance and views at our quiet parking lot. The only attractions at this far southeastern corner of the park are the hot springs and the road out to Boquillas Canyon. The short trail at the end of that road is very worthwhile, leading to the Rio Grande and an entrance to a canyon. When we checked out of the RV park we drove out to the Chisos Basin road, leaving our rigs at a spacious historical marker turnout, then took the tow car up to explore the Chisos Basin and have lunch. We then moved out to Terlingua (Big Bend Motor Inn/RV) as a base to explore the rest of the park including Santa Elena Canyon. If you have a rig under 24 feet and don’t care about hookups, the most central place to stay in the park is the scenic campground at Chisos Basin, but signs warn that this is also the area where cougars and bears are more prevalent. Chisos Basin has the most hiking trails, the only restaurant (casual, but good food with great views), but is not next to the river. I was disappointed at the location of the main park campgrounds at Rio Grande Village. Perhaps it was a more worthwhile location when the border between the quaint town of Boquillas was open, but now it is too far removed from most park features. Despite the location, while I was there it was an enjoyable place to stay.
02/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
We had stayed at Rio Grande Village hookups for a couple of nights, but we felt that for the same price this campground in Terlingua was the better bet for a base for exploring the area, assuming you are a big rig and need full hookups. We looked around and although not a ravaging beauty, this RV park seemed nicer than the others in town. It is right at the junction of highways 118 and 170, and is walking distance to a couple of restaurants, a bank, and post office, just a few miles from the Big Bend NP west entrance station. We explored the west side of the National Park from here, including the beautiful Ross Maxwell Drive, and the highlight of the park at the end, the short (but steep) trail to Saint Elena Canyon. We also drove the extremely scenic river road from Lajitas to Presidio through Big Bend Ranch State Park (no fee for driving, only hiking) from here, rather than taking our rig up and down the ominous 15+% grade two mile hill. A challenging golf course is on site, but when we were there it was not being kept up well, and was free to play (cart $5). It was worthwhile for a fun practice round. The course in Lajitas had been washed away in a recent flood. The best feature for us was a 4-mile unpaved and little used road (some small hills) that leads north from the campground and is immediately very scenic, making for a great bike ride or walk to start the day. It ends at the National Park boundary where a trail (lock your bikes here and walk) leads in about a quarter mile to some rock paintings. The town of Terlingua (made famous in country songs) is actually friendly and artsy. There is no town center per se, it’s just strewn along Hwy 170, but its cultural center is being redefined about 5 miles away in the quirky Ghost Town area, worth a visit for its historic cemetery, large rambling Terlingua Trading Co. store, the Starlight Theater (now a restaurant) and other galleries and cafes, now popping up inside the old adobe ruins. We saw a good play for $8 near there. As for restaurants, we had a great authentic Tex-Mex lunch at Rio Bravo, a half mile south of the campground on FM170. The quirky pink Kosmic Kowgirl Kafe further along is a fun place to experience, but it took forever to get our food, which was good, but your average fare. We did not try the on-site campground cafe, which had a small breakfast buffet on weekends for $7. A Wi-Fi transmitter is on the cafe, but only the sites closest to it will receive it. We payed $3 extra per night for #18, a 50-amp site close to the transmitter and it worked well. Contrary to another review, our fixed roof Dish satellite came in, but we had to move back and forth in the site to get it, possibly because of a small tree on the site. Like the others in town, the campground is unpaved, and in this area that means dust. A water truck came along periodically which helped a bit, but was noisy and created its own dust. Sites have a patch of dried up vegetation and picnic table. Some have small trees, and desert mountains can be seen in the distance. Office staff were friendly. We did not use the restrooms or laundry. RV guests are welcome to free coffee at the motor inn. The full hookups worked fine, but you may want to stock up on bottled water before coming to this area, since the water tastes terrible. By the end of our three-night stay, we were moved to buy some Viva Terlingua! souvenirs.
01/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Rally Park is affiliated with a large RV dealership, Lazy Days, and its location adjacent to it makes for a sea of RV’s off of I-4, just east of I-75. We chose it for its location, and we appreciated the easy 1-hour drive to Disney World to the east on I-4, and the access to Tampa/St. Pete area to the west. Our site was spacious with a nice grassy area with picnic table, a level paved pad, and good 50-amp service. Our Dish satellite came in with no problem. It’s a high quality operation, and the 14-day limit and higher cost means there were mostly nicer rigs in the park with no permanent residents. The free wifi was a disappointment, which did not work from our site as promised even though we were close to the main facilities. They do have a nice computer room with modem hookups and electrical outlets where the wifi worked very well. The laundry facility was good, and the large screened-in swimming pool/spa area was impressive. The morning Tampa paper delivered to our door was a nice touch. We did not take advantage of the free breakfast and lunch, but we did go over to check it out – you have to drive to the Lazy Days dealership and their cafeteria serves assembly line small meals. The lunch we witnessed people carrying out of the place was not appealing. We opted to go to nearby East Tampa’s Old Town, Ybor City, for Cuban food instead. Having Camping World in the complex was helpful, and there is also a Flying J facility with buffet restaurant, and a Cracker Barrel. All in all, I can recommend this RV park as a good home base if you don’t care about scenery, although the price was a few dollars too high at $39 including tax. I would stay here again though.
01/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
During our adventurous winter travels we needed a place to mellow out for a while, and tried this place because of the other good reviews. It turned out to be the perfect choice. They accepted Passport America, hence the great $16 rate. Wifi is important to us, and although it costs extra here ($18 per week) it was the best wifi we’ve had at a campground in a long time. Even at our remote, idyllic site (21), we had a full signal, and even with some trees around the site our Dish satellite came in. Although unpaved, our site was fairly level with a picnic table and fire ring, atop a small cliff overlooking the Frio River, which is very shallow and wide here due to an impoundment. It’s the quietest campground we’ve been to (though I’m sure summer is a different story) and one of the most tranquil. Although the campground advertises being adjacent to the State Park, it is actually 2.5 miles to the long entrance road, unless you can swim across the river. The campground has a large store that is nicely stocked with RV supplies and also some groceries. There is propane for sale. The staff is friendly and they have a large function room. Although it was wonderful here, we did have substantial discomfort at times from the dreaded Juniper pollen that plagues this and other portions of the southwest in December and January. This is the closest I’ve come to giving a campground a 10, especially due to the cost for what we got here, but due to the remoteness, unpaved sites, no cell phone coverage (Verizon) and the Juniper pollen, it drops down slightly.
01/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a friendly park, way south of San Antonio, but with easy access to I-37, it takes only 20-30 minutes to get to the Alamo. They take Passport America without restrictions, so for us, camping for $18 so close to a major city was a great deal. If it had cost the full $36 I would have rated it a 7 at most. The campground is large, and it seemed mostly taken up with extended stay customers. The nicest and most expensive sites look out over a small lake. The only sites available when we checked in were pull-throughs near the front of the park. They staggered the rigs with empty sites, which was appreciated, since those sites are very close together. The park seemed safe, and was quiet except for some freeway noise from nearby I-37. They have activities on site for campers, and the friendly gent who escorted us to our site invited us to that evening’s cookout. We just stayed for two nights while touring the area, so we did not participate or use any campground facilities. The 50 amp full hookups worked fine, however the free wifi was so overloaded that I could only get it to work well after midnight. Our Dish satellite worked well with no obstructions. It’s not scenic at all (except for the on-site pond perhaps), but that has more to do with the region, which is fairly bleak. There is only a hamburger restaurant nearby, otherwise if you drive up to the Military Road exit and head west, you’ll find everything you could need. We would definitely return at the Passport America rate.
01/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a good choice for a west Houston base. It’s in a quiet area just west of the toll-way. If you’re there on weekends you have the bonus of the giant marketplace on site. Sites are a bit close together, but are nicely laid out. Our 50-amp utilities worked fine in our pull-through site. Rigs in this popular park are mostly newer and well kept. The laundry is convenient and inexpensive ($1 wash). There is a pool and a sketchy mini-golf course. Wi-fi is Tengo ($5/day, etc) but worked well for us. The cost, around $28 with tax for Good Sam/AAA, is reasonable for such a nice campground so close to a major city. We had some open sky to look at out the front, and there were no obstructions for our satellite. I would stay here again.
01/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a good stopover in Acadiana country. The open campground is visible from I-10, and there is the typical freeway noise. There are no services nearby, but in 8 miles either direction (Jennings west and Crowley east) on I-10 are restaurants, including Cajun, and stores and other services. The 50 amp service worked well, and the hookup also included water and sewer. The free Wi-Fi here worked during our stay, always appreciated. The signal is probably strongest closest to the office. Satellite users will have no obstructions. They also have bathroom and laundry facilities. A medium sized pond is on the property, and I noticed one person fishing. It seems to be mostly longer-term residents staying here, and some shabby rigs detract from the atmosphere, but it was a perfectly fine place to spend the night.
01/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is so close, yet so far, from the north edge of the beautiful French Quarter. In between is a large, abandoned (since Katrina) supermarket property, that is adjacent to low-income ‘projects.’ The friendly, helpful staff here believes that it is probably OK to walk through the supermarket property during daylight, but not at night. They offer a free golf cart ride through that property and drop you off at a Welcome Center next to a police station, 24 hours a day, as long as someone is available to do it (i.e., don’t count on it). We were just passing through for a one-night visit of "N'awlins" this time, and being so close to I-10 and the French Quarter was perfect for us. Their option to pay $5/hour for late checkout was also appreciated. We took the golf cart ride in the afternoon to see what it entailed, but on the way back in the early evening there was an event going on nearby and several cops were around to guard the parked cars, so we just walked with no incident. I’m not sure just how dangerous it really is (due to the proximity of the police station and the fact that it is well-lit), or if the management is overprotective. You can of course take a cab to and from the heart of the French Quarter, and a company is recommended by the camp. The camp itself is a fortress, surrounded by walls topped with barbed wire, and security gates for both vehicles and pedestrians. After midnight you need to call security to get back in. Inside are large, paved sites, with grassy areas, and ample place to park your extra vehicle. A few sites have screened gazebos. The perimeter sites seem nicer than the ones in the interior lot that back up against each other. The modern central facilities have several individual bathrooms with showers (the best/most modern I've seen at a campground), a small heated pool and spa (the spa was not working at the time), laundry, workout room, big screen TV room, a large BBQ, free morning coffee, and a nice computer room with two computers. They claim to have free wi-fi but the system was being ‘upgraded’ during our stay and never worked. All in all it was worth the $62 (Good Sam/AAA) to be in a new, secure, modern campground within easy walking distance of the French Quarter. Passport America will give you a bigger discount for one night Monday-Thursday non-holiday only. I would definitely stay here again.
01/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is one of the most beautiful campgrounds I’ve ever stayed in, and for $24 in South Florida near Naples and Ft. Meyers, wow! It’s not on the beach, but it does have a river running next to it that is popular for canoeing. It also has its namesake, a historic site, to explore. Each site is surrounded on three sides by tropical vegetation, giving the site a tropical garden feel. Each has a picnic table, fire ring, and hooks for a clothes line. There is a 30amp electric and water hookup, but no sewer, although there is a double dump station. There are also adequate bathroom and shower facilities. I don't believe there is a laundry. There is no Wi-Fi. A Publix grocery and some restaurants are a 20-minute walk from the sites. Sites are mostly reservable, but if you arrive and are lucky enough to grab a walk-in site, you can stay for up to 14 days. We intended to stay two nights but ended up staying for four since it was so nice.
01/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
With all the accolades bestowed upon this park we were set up for a disappointment, but as it turns out this was a fantastic place to stay, even on a crowded New Years holiday week. The campground itself is good, but not great. It lacks a sewer connection (there is a dump station – but they have strict blue boy rules), as well as Wi-Fi, laundry, and privacy between sites. On the positive side, it is small at under 50 sites (and getting a spot here via reservations is difficult), being a state park it is a fraction of the cost of the private camps on the Keys, it does have shower facilities, and many sites have 50 amps as well as water. Sites are along one row, each site backing into dense tropical forest (though satellite worked fine for us). One of the rows has a small murky pond beyond the trees, which I don’t consider ‘waterfront’ as one of the campground guides described. After three days here, I am still not sure if pets are allowed. I’ve seen it written as both ways, and have not seen any pets. I don’t see why they wouldn’t be allowed, however, since there is a paucity of wildlife in this park. There were plenty of Ibis birds, who come begging for food, and are beautiful to watch, but that’s about it. This park is the main attraction on Key Largo, so staying here gives one an advantage because the park is so overrun with day use visitors from Miami that there are typically long lines to get in via the single entrance kiosk, and after lots fill, they close it off. If you are camping here you have to wait in the same long lines, so we only returned to the park in the late afternoons to avoid the lines. The coral reef that is the park’s main purpose is located about 7 miles offshore in open ocean, and without your own boat (there is a boat launch, $10) you must take either a snorkeling tour or a glass bottom boat tour to get there, each lasting about 2.5 hours and costing around $25. Private tour boats leave from other areas of Key Largo. We took the park’s glass bottom boat option, and thoroughly enjoyed the fully narrated tour. The boat meanders slowly through the shallow mangrove channels adjacent to the main park area, then zips across the open ocean to the same reef site where snorkelers and divers head to. The docent describes the abundant sea life display seen through the glass bottom for a good half hour, which is long enough that those with sensitive constitutions should take Dramamine before leaving. It is sold on board. Our boat was full and we had to squeeze in to see anything, although we were impressed with the show that included barracuda. Advance reservations are recommended. There are also canoe trails through the mangroves next to the main part of the park, and you can rent a kayak or canoe for $12/hour (plenty of time to do the whole trail). It was fun to canoe the winding trails, avoiding being entangled by mangroves in some areas, but we did not see any wildlife except for a few fish. The mangroves are not even preferred by alligators since there is no muddy bank; the highly protected mangroves have a unique above ground root system in the salt water environment. The only place to snorkel in the park without taking a boat is a small sandy beach near the visitors center, where there are smaller fish darting through the sea grass and a re-created shipwreck to gawk at 100 feet out. The beach (good for children/novice snorkelers) was completely packed when we were there, although the swimming area was more sparsely used, perhaps indicating chilly water. The small food concession had surprisingly good and reasonably priced breakfast and lunch items. There is a bike trail adjacent to Hwy 1, so you can ride to shopping centers and some restaurants within 1-2 miles. I would stay here again.
01/2009
rating [ 5/10 ]
This was our first visit to Key West and it happened to be during the New Years holiday when prices were at a high and availability at a low. Boyds’ was requiring a 4 night minimum and the stay would have cost $450 with tax for an inland site, ridiculous in my book. Leo’s is the only other public campground on Stock Island (besides the small & pricey El Mar resort), which is the island adjacent to the east of Key West. There are no public campgrounds on the island of Key West itself. Still expensive at $72 per night with tax, at least we could stay for fewer nights. Leo’s is actually 1 mile closer to Key West than Boyd’s, but is not a waterfront camp. Rather it is in a commercial/industrial/low end residential area, but nothing all that terrible, although I strongly advise locking your bikes and not leaving any valuables outside. There are several restaurants within walking distance. You’ve seen RV parks like this all over, just very basic, in the middle of a town, usually costing in the $20-$25 range. The location a half block south of US 1 and close to the short bridge to Key West was a big bonus for us since we were able to easily our bikes into town both days. I rank Key West as one of the most bike-friendly towns anywhere. Once across the bridge (with wide bike lanes), turn left onto the sidewalk that leads to a spectacular sidewalk/bike trail along the southern coast next to open ocean, and ends up at some of Key West's most popular beaches on the south end. Another trail to town (right onto the sidewalk after the bridge) traverses the north shore, which is more bay-like. It is a bit shorter and subject to less wind, but through a less scenic commercial area. Bear right on Palm Ave to get to the waterfront area. Each route mentioned takes about 25-35 minutes riding at a medium clip to get into downtown at the western end of the key. Once there you will encounter more bikes and mopeds on the narrow streets than cars, though the on-street riding through downtown is not suitable for children. There is also a bus stop adjacent to the campground, or you can try your luck at parking, which is tough but not impossible downtown. The least crowded driving route into town is along the south shore. If you are here on New Years Eve, make sure to watch the drag queen Sushi drop down for the countdown in her ruby slipper at Bourbon St. Bar on Duval. It has become more of a mixed crowd over the years due to its annual coverage on CNN. Or you can watch a wench being lowered down a mast at the harbor, or a conch shell drop down at Sloppy Joe’s bar. New Years Day is equally festive around town. Key West may just be the most fun town to ring out the old/in the new/ in the country. Leo’s was an OK place to hang out when not in town, but not somewhere I would want to spend a lot of time, which turned out to be a good thing since it forced us to get out into wonderful Key West rather than lazing around the campsite. Our campsite was just long enough for our 35-foot motorhome with two slides on one side, and with plenty of room to park the toad beside it, behind the picnic table. Since we were close to the office, a low to medium Wi-Fi signal came in, enough to do email. A covered bench is provided outside the office to get closer to the signal. It was out for 1 of our 3 days there, typical for campgrounds! There are several trees around the camp, and one of them blocked our Dish satellite from site 12. Since the camp was full they could not move us. Again, another reason to get out of the coach and into town! The power worked well enough for the AC, although the supposed 50 amp connection registered as 30 amps in our coach. We did not need to use the washroom facilities since there was a sewer hookup. The office staff was friendly but not very helpful in terms of what to do in the area. Just across US1 is the Key West Country Club, but at $150/$95 twilight we passed. I would prefer to stay at one of the waterfront campgrounds the next time I visit the area, but would consider staying here again due to its proximity to Key West and lower cost.
11/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
We stayed here en route because they had a vacancy over a holiday weekend and were good enough to accept Passport America, which cost $22 with taxes. The entrance to the resort is very nice with a lake, tennis courts, mini golf, lawns and trees, but the actual campground is crowded and dumpy. For the cost it was great since it had full 50 amp hookups that worked fine, and our Dish Satellite came in despite the pine trees. They charge extra for everything, including $3 for cable, and Wi-Fi is through Tengo for $5/day. Atmosphere was very Daytona, with lots of loud motorcycles, ATV's, and drinkers. I didn't explore the pool or other facilities. At that price I would stay here again, but it's not the kind of campground I'd like to spend much time in.
11/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is one huge park! We stayed one night, but our friends enjoyed the beach so much that allows dogs that they stayed 3 nights. They charge extra for sites with concrete pads, but they did not seem any more level than the others. Only one precious row is along the beach, the rest are inland but a fairly short walk to the beach. Wifi is a whopping $10/day, and the outdoor snack bar with free wifi is a very long walk from most sites. The laundry and other facilities seemed top notch. The price seemed reasonable for what it is. Although it's not my style of campground, I would stay here again.
11/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
I loved this campground and highly recommend it. I stayed in Site #1 which cost $45+tax. It was private with beautiful landscaping, spacious, the wifi broadcast from the office worked great and my Dish satellite worked from there as well. The atmosphere is delightful, along a river with a marina, across from a wildlife sanctuary. Sites have nice paved pads and most have appealing landscaping. Perimeter sites have most privacy. Wifi doesn't work at the more remote sites. Riverfront sites may be worthwhile as a splurge ($70 w tax) due to their nice decks overlooking the marina. Sites are all back-in though. The pool is in a beautiful setting over the water. The location is just over the bridge to the island. Rather than riding from camp, I recommend transporting your bikes to ride on the hard sand of the beautiful Atlantic beach on the south side of the island. Although my experience was a "10" I rate it 9 due to high price (but good for Hilton Head), lack of wifi throughout the park, and observation of many of the sites that were not as nice as the one I had.
11/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
This camp consists of an open parking lot in a marina. Sites are long but narrow, just wide enough for slide-outs. It attracts a lot of higher end rigs. The price is steep at $60 but the 7th night is free. They still do not have wifi and only a phone modem hookup is available in the office. The 50-amp service worked well. There’s no sewer but there is a dump station. The code-locked restrooms have large showers & there is a laundry room. Although you can see plenty of Jersey City high-rises from your site, only a couple of sites have views of the buildings on the southern tip of Manhattan. Many have views of Statue of Liberty and the Ellis Island buildings though, with the Verezano Narrows Bridge beyond. The camp is not on the banks of the Hudson as the ads would make it seem, but rather behind a marina and a large park. Since it is also a marina and ferry terminal they have 24-hour security. Jersey City has much improved over the years with redevelopment, but having security is still nice to have. The camp-host in the office was helpful with directions and logistics on getting into Manhattan. Passenger commuter ferries depart from the marina on weekdays only in the mornings and afternoons and sail to South Street Seaport near Chinatown, Little Italy, Soho, etc.. That is the most pleasant way into Manhattan, but expensive at $6 each way. The crowded PATH subway train, open 24/7, is the most sensible option at $1.75 each way, and drops you off conveniently at 33rd Street in Manhattan. The Grove Street station is a brisk 12-minute walk from the camp up Marin Blvd. It seems like a safe area, but if you feel uncomfortable walking in the area at night, taxis are $5. The worthwhile ferry to Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island leaves from Liberty State Park, 1.5 miles away from the camp (Cost $12 each plus parking $7) and is much less crowded here than leaving from Manhattan. Reserve in advance (on line or phone) for a specific departure to avoid waiting on crowded days and make sure to get a ticket that includes the limited number of Monument Passes to be able to access the statue’s pedestal and museum (prepare for thorough security screening). The audio tour is very worthwhile for Ellis Island, but not for Liberty Island. The camp office has vouchers with codes for discounted Broadway play tickets that you can then buy by phone, but beware of the $7+ each convenience charges doing it that way. It was nice to purchase in advance without having to wait in lines in the City. To get a discount for the most popular plays is difficult but you can try being the first in line at a TKTS booth at Times Square or South Street Seaport. If you go to Broadway, discount vouchers are handed out on the streets to many plays that need to fill seats. To get around Manhattan we purchased the $25 Metro pass valid for one week (cannot be shared or used on PATH), which was very convenient on all buses and subways. We also drove into Manhattan a couple of days, and the Holland Tunnel is just a few minutes up Marin Blvd. All in all, both RV parties had a fantastic week in NYC using this camp as our home base. Note that another more scenic option for camping in the region is Croton Point Park on the Hudson River in Westchester County, which is near the Metro North commuter rail line. It is half the price but only open seasonally and it may take you over a half hour longer to get into Manhattan.
10/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
This was the only campground open in the Bar Harbor area the last week in October and we stayed their last two nights of operation. Even though we were the only ones in the entire campground, they stood fast to their tiered pricing rule, so $40 got us fully serviced 50-amp sites in an open area near the highway with no view. A site with a distant view of the adjacent inlet would have cost $50 and to be right on the inlet $65, which were all discounted over peak rates. On top of that, wifi is $5/day. Most other campgrounds we stayed at this late in the season let us take whatever site we wanted when the place was empty, and it gave us a bad taste that they didn’t give us a free upgrade. Besides that pet peeve, the host was helpful, the 50-amp utilities worked fine, the gravel site was level, and there was a lobster pound next door that was still open. Our Dish satellite worked well in the open area, and they also have 70-channel cable. The campground’s facilities were closed when we stayed here so perhaps the amenities make the high cost more justifiable in the summer, when all the RV campgrounds near Bar Harbor price gouge anyway. The camp is on the mainland side just across the bridge from Mount Desert Island, adjacent to a narrow inlet that they refer to as being on “The Ocean.” Acadia National Park is a 20-minute drive and Bar Harbor is 25 minutes away (probably more in peak season). The Narrows’ other campground and Bar Harbor Campground are about 10 minutes closer to those attractions. In town we enjoyed Poorboys Gourmet restaurant and bike riding along Acadia National Parks carriage roads. (866) 917-4300
10/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
Rockwood Park is a huge city park on the west side of Saint John. The campground contains a large, ugly gravel area with full hookups where most RV’er stay, many of whom are local workers. There is a wifi tower on the laundry/washroom facility, but it did not work when we were there, so we sought a more scenic site, and found a section on the edge of a cliff overlooking Saint John that had only three precious 30-amp sites (the rest were 15 amp). We had a great panorama of all of Saint John and out to the ocean beyond. We enjoyed this site a lot. Had we been stuck in the large gravel lot area it would not have been very pleasant, wifi or no. At the time it was filled with workers doing business in town. The hookup worked fine and our Dish Satellite came in where we were. There was some city noise and train noise, but that was part of the excitement. Rockwood Park has miles of trails, a golf course, zoo, information centre, etc. It’s only a 5-minute drive to Uptown Saint John (which confusingly is the downtown), one of the only nice areas in this heavily industrialized city. Take the historic walking tours, visit the market and the museums. The famous reversing falls takes place in another section of town, along the Saint John River, about 10 minutes drive from the park. Because of the Bay of Fundy’s extreme tides, rapids are created in the Saint John River to compensate for the water level change, and the direction of the rapids is determined by whether the tide is going in or out. It is a gradual change, with slack water in between the changes. A visitor’s center and observation deck next to the free bridge (not the Hwy 1 toll bridge) has a movie, restaurants overlooking the river, and helpful documents. It is good to watch from this side, since there is a large ugly factory along the river that you see if you look from the other side. Another park across the river gets you down close to the rapids, and daredevils can take jet boats from there that go directly into the raging rapids and around whirlpools. Expect to get jolted around intensely and very wet! There are also tamer tours. We also enjoyed walking around Irving Park along the Bay in the south end of town. We would stay here again because of the location.
10/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground was open late in October, a very welcome sight. Its biggest asset is the large scenic property that contains lakes, forest, trails, and even some Bay of Fundy frontage. Most of the RV sites are in the forest, with one row overlooking a pretty lake. Another row is more open and near the office, also with a view of a lake out the front. Although less scenic than the wooded sites, we stayed here because we could get our Dish satellite to work, as well as the free wifi that is broadcast from the office only. It appears that another section of serviced sites closer to the Bay is still not operational. Although most everything was shut down, it seems to have a lot going for it during peak season including a pool and boat rentals for the lakes. We took advantage of its proximity to Hopewell Rocks, a 5-minute drive from the camp (walking not advised along the road). Although that park was officially closed, we were still able to enjoy a ‘walk on the ocean floor’ and watch the tide rise extremely quickly around the scenic rocks. We would stay here again, even though the coastal road from Moncton to Fundy National Park is in terrible shape. (800) 822-8800
10/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
We were glad this campground remained open in late October as we headed south out of Canada. Sites are grassy and got really muddy in the rain, but the 30-amp utility worked fine (50 amp costs extra to unlock), and we were able to get Dish satellite from the open site that we selected away from the trees. The wifi did not work at all, even next to the office. The property is pleasant enough, with a big grassy field that they have a music festival on during Labor Day, a pond, and lots of trees. It’s close to the airport so when the wind is blowing in a certain direction the airport noise got fairly loud. It’s also convenient to Bangor attractions and shopping. Best of all they accepted our Passport America for two nights, which brought the cost way down. Several old rigs scattered around diminished the atmosphere, but not badly. I would definitely stay here again at the Passport America rate.
10/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
After a 6-week tour of the fabulous Atlantic Provinces, we felt that we had saved the best for last. As it was late October it was one of the only campgrounds open in all of New Brunswick. One section to the side was full of empty seasonal RV’s, but all the prime sites were still available for over night, which we appreciated. They have a tiered pricing system, but it costs only a few dollars extra to get a site in the front row with a great view of the Bay of Fundy across lightly-traveled Water Street. Since the camp had only had a few customers, they let us take any site for the lowest price, and gave us a break on our third night. Peak rates are higher, and when the place is full it may seem a bit crowded with no privacy between sites in the open campground. The utilities for each pair of sites are in the same place, which means motorhomes can select a front-in site and trailers a back-in site, each being able to take advantage of the great view in the front row. The sites are level, with 30-amps, water and sewer. The wifi towers are near the office and laundry rooms, so we had only intermittent reception of the free service in the oceanfront row. Our Dish satellite worked from here. The laundry and washroom facilities were adequate. In the summer they have lots going on we understand, but everything was shut down when we were there. The lovely St. Andrews downtown section is only a 10-minute walk in one direction along Water Street, and a great park and wildlife refuge (popular with dog walkers) is a few minutes in the other direction. Bikers will love the short and flat ride to downtown, with the option of exploring the picture-perfect streets and up the hill to the Fairmont Algonquin, which has a highly-rated golf course. We enjoyed watching from our RV windows the extreme Fundy tides, the islands beyond, and even a storm at high tide as waves lapped up and sprayed onto Water Street. I already miss this place, what a great place to stay!
10/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
The camp is a fairly level gravel lot along a bluff, with picnic tables at each site. They also have a small gazebo and picnic tables lined along the bluff for those not on the end – which are Sites 6 and 7 – those have unobstructed views to the north of the open ocean and a few close-in islands. In season (late spring/early summer) one may be able to see whales and even icebergs from your site. In October, we enjoyed watching a few storms move through, the changing colours, and seabirds including Bald Eagles. All sites are back in, so motorhomes not in sites 6 or 7 would have peek views of the ocean from the front I suppose. Sites are 30-amp and fully serviced. The main business is the motel, and the RV park is treated as an afterthought, but guests are allowed to use the nice hotel common room to get WiFi (which was down during our stay) and the laundry room (also out of order). They did give us a cash discount off the usual $28 because of the off-season and lack of amenities, as well as not having available showers. I advise calling first to see what is going on before deciding to come here.
10/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This large, well run municipal campground is within Pippy Park in the city of St. Johns. Pippy Park itself is huge, and has many amenities, but it is so large that you cannot walk to the golf courses, except for the mini golf. You can walk to adjacent Long Pond, which is an excellent place for a stroll around with your pooch. The camp is very popular with islanders and can fill up on holiday weekends. It offers several choices – a large open fairly ugly big rig pull through area with good WiFi for $39; pretty park-like wooded, private, fully serviced sites for $34 (where we stayed for 5 days), or similar E&W sites for $29. In October they offer every third night free, which lowered our average cost. To get wifi, one must drive up to the pull-through area and sit in the car to get Internet. The staff seems to be comprised of students from the huge adjacent University, and are very helpful and knowledgeable. There is an expensive laundry facility, and nice restrooms, although a friend reports the showers did not have enough hot water.
09/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a very nicely run, friendly, large campground with row after row of spacious sites with gravel pads. There are a few trees throughout, so satellite users should make sure not to be placed next to one. Wi-Fi is free, but reception is spotty. Facilities are nicely maintained. It is in a rural area next to the freeway, and noise from Rte 20 is pervasive throughout. Although it didn't bother me, it did bother my friend in a less insulated rig. It's a 15 minute drive to Levis to catch the fabulous riverside bike trail or the ferry to old town Quebec. The 10-minute $2.70 ferry ($5-$6 parking) is a much better way to go into town than driving. The view is awesome. A funicular ($1.75) then takes you up to the Chateau Frontenac area to avoid walking up the hill. The campground is on the east side of Levis, about 20 minutes on Rte 20 from the bridge, so it's about a 45 minute drive into Old Quebec plus any rush hour delays, then parking is $2/hour at meters with 2 hour limits. In the lower section of town there are 5 hour meters.
09/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a perfectly nice, friendly, well-run campground east of Ottawa. $29 for full hookups (30amp) is a good rate for the area, and the utilities worked fine. They turn on/off the electric (hydro) via computer which is odd, so if you arrive after office hours you may be out of luck if no one is around to help you. The pull through sites are the most popular, but the back-in sites near the road are the most private. Road noise bothered our friends but not us, it's a rural road and really isn't bad. The free wifi worked but like many campgrounds was very slow. Our US Dish satellite worked fine. They include a few cable channels in the hookup. We didn't use the facilities, so can't comment on that. It's in a pleasant rural area, and there's lots of vegetation around the grounds, making it a nice place to return to after a day touring Ottawa. Sites have grass and small picnic tables. The route to downtown is a 2-lane highway that turns into a freeway, and beware that the route can be congested during rush hour, increasing the 20-minute drive to up to an hour. Some take buses from Orleans (10 minutes drive east), but with four of us it was cheaper and more convenient to drive and park in a lot in the ByWard Market area. Tip: Ottawa has fabulous easy scenic bike trails along the Ottawa River and the canal where you can ride for miles and miles. The reasons I knocked off points: No view as advertised, slow wifi, uneven gravel pads (new 50amp pads are better but more $), distance from downtown, nothing to walk to from property. I would stay here again.
09/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
We had a fairly level gravel site [#109] with a nice view of Lake Michigan (though not the bridge) out the front of our motorhome. Dish came in great at the south-facing site, as did their free Wi-fi. Staff was nice. It is not a lakefront campground, but across the road there are no houses between the road and the lake. St. Ignace is a 10-minute drive where all the passenger ferries to Mackinac Island leave. It is an expensive campground area, and although this camp is $36, you can save $5 by paying cash and not hooking up your sewer (there is a dump). That brings it on par to even Straits State Park. It is on an uncrowded loop road so it is very quiet. Negatives are many of the sites are gravel and uneven; high price; not actually on the lake; sites close together (but wide). I did not use the facilities.
09/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
We just stayed for an overnight, but really enjoyed this City Park gem at only $20. It was much quieter than most other campgrounds despite its proximity to M28. We were in Site 25 with a view past a vacant lake front site to lovely Lake Superior. We had to do a little moving around to get our fixed roof Dish to work , but the trees are sparse here so we were able to get it. The 50 amp worked fine, but utilities are shared so if the other rig is using the 50 you'll be stuck with the 30 which others have reported can be iffy. The water hookup required an extension. Hosts were friendly and helpful. It's about a 10 minute drive into Munising for the famous boat tours and restaurants. The Dogpatch was a fun place to eat. Negatives include the unpaved grassy or gravel sites can get muddy and/or wet; no sewer hookup (but there is a dump); 30 amp problems & hookup placements as mentioned by others; no Wi-Fi; and judging by the crowds after Labor Day, it probably fills much of the time in peak season.
09/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is nothing but a parking lot in a marina with sites lined up next to each other. They are wide sites with picnic tables provided. In the electric/water sites there is an awesome view past the marina across the bay toward the city of Duluth and its trademark lift bridge. If your view is out your back window you will look toward the other direction of Superior, WI. There is a dump station on site. The full hookup sites are in front of the facility near the office and have a view out the front only, though not as good as the partial hookup sites. It is less than 10 minutes walk to the Lift Bridge, across which is the main tourist area of Duluth with Grandma's restaurants and the free Corps of Engineers visitors center/museum. The coming and going of the huge lake ships are a big deal here, and the Lift Bridge raises all the way up for them, with visitors lining the shore to watch the event. Ride your bike right from the campground across the bridge to the fabulous Lake shore trail and ride for 5 miles along the beautiful lake. At $32/$37 it is pricey but the location/view makes it worth it - BUT be warned that wifi costs $9/day $28/week which drops its rating from a 9 to an 8 in my book.
08/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is THE place to RV camp in the immediate Fargo area (by process of elimination if anything), if you don't need Wi-Fi or a sewer hookup. There is a dump station on site though. This lovely riverside park is very popular with locals for group picnics, etc and has a very nice community feel to it. Great riverside paved trails connect to downtown Fargo and Moorehead, with connections available that can lead to a 25-mile loop around Fargo for bikers. Free bike maps may be available in the park office. The Red River of the North is also a designated canoe route, but I didn't see a single boat in the river when we were there for 4 days in the peak of summer. There are two RV sections: the upper section is popular with RV's but is crowded, has no views, and the freeway noise is intense. Some RV'ers may prefer this area since it is closer to the showers and restrooms. Vehicles going over the river bridge sound like constant fireworks from here though. We chose the lower section that has more spacious, grassy sites, although it also attracts tenter's of all walks of life. They are back-in with the river in front, so motorhomes have the view advantage there. Most of the lower sites have severe slopes requiring intense leveling, and some of the hookups are too far away from the site to be used, indicating the hookups were an afterthought for those sites. Only a few of the sites are level. There is still highway noise, but less than the upper sites. Our Dish and hookups worked fine from Site 23 (trees block satellite from many sites). As others have stated, late spring is flood season here so stay in the upper area. Check-in is a bit strange since the office has limited and inconsistent hours. I believe you can occupy any site that does not indicate that it's reserved, and then pay later.
08/2008
rating [ 4/10 ]
Fargo is a tough area to find a decent campground in. This one, about 20 minutes west of the city, at least had good utility hookups. The wifi worked ok as well, but ask for a site where it comes in. The camp itself is as unappealing as they come, crowded with rigs of all types, no trees, gravel roads. The hotel has a restaurant and an indoor pool/waterpark (extra fee) that kids may enjoy. There is also a bar on site. In all, it's not a campground I'd want to hang out in for more than one night if I didn't have to.
08/2008
rating [ 5/10 ]
This is a large RV/mobile home facility directly adjacent to I-15, though separated by a tall sound wall. Sites are very tight and there are a lot of full timers including many old rigs. Wifi worked OK, but at peak times the signal diminished significantly. Trees scattered around the site make it more park-like, and there is a pool which we don't take advantage of. We just stay here for overnights when passing through when we want hook-ups and wifi.
08/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a good option for stays in Bozeman due to its location, only a 5-minute drive from active and quaint Main Street, downtown. Bozeman is a great little town, very artsy and outdoorsy. The hosts/owners were very friendly and set the tone for a very congenial campground. There appeared to be mostly long-term campers here and even some tenters. Sites are gravel and fairly tight, with sparse grass in between. The outer row where we stayed looks out over a field with the I-90 freeway beyond, although they placed everyone so that the view was to the interior instead. Freeway noise is a problem and did wake me up early. There is no cable TV, but several networks come in via antenna. The free wifi worked exceptionally well. I noted a lot of RV's at the nice WalMart Supercenter at the next exit to the west which would be a better bet for a late arrival/early departure, but this is the place to stay for exploring Bozeman.
07/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
We stay here annually for 1-2 weeks in summer for the waterfront sites that face Victoria Harbour, although it is a splurge. Even during the downturn in RV'ing the campground is filling with European RV renters during the summer to take up any of the slack, so it is still full most every night in summer. The reason is because of its location in Esquimalt near the entrance to Victoria Harbour with a birds eye view of all the activities - float planes, cruise ships, Washington-bound ferries, the Victoria skyline, etc. The interior sites are less expensive but with little or no view. There is even a boat launch so you can go launch your small boat. We take our zodiak with 2 hp motor and putter around Victoria Harbour - but - beware - motorized boats must cross near the entrance to the harbour that can be quite rough, and across the busy float plane runway! Runway lights indicate plane takeoff/landing but with a slow boat there's not enough warning so you have to scan the waters yourself. Kayakers can take an alternate route. We launch here for Symphony Splash, and coming back in the dark is even more dicey - no float planes but lots of power boats leaving the event. Launching in the Gorge waterway is much safer! The 3-km walkway into town is great, but it's best not to do this alone or in the dark due to the many drug addicts in Victoria, and possibly along the trail. Also, one time after a couple of weeks staying here & walking to town frequently, I developed a respiratory infection, possibly from all the jet fuel that wafts through the air from the turboprop planes. The harbour ferries (little water taxis) also are based at the marina/campground, but it's $16 roundtrip per person to the Empress, $8 to Fisherman's Wharf. Parking in downtown is about $2/hour. If you like ethnic food, a fabulous Ethiopian buffet, the Blue Nile, is a 10-minute walk up Head St (dinner only, $14). The campground itself is mostly gravel lots with rigs slammed in close together, making getting into spots a challenge for larger rigs depending on who is already parked there. I have been coming here for years, and they have never gotten their wi-fi to work right, which is maddening for what they charge. At least now it's free, they used to charge for it! They have the attitude that if you don't like it here, go somewhere else, which is most likely the mediocre Ft. Victoria down the road. The office staff ranges from fantastic and friendly to totally incompetent and rude, best of luck there. We don't use the facilities much but they seem fine, and they finally moved the laundry to where the RV's are, rather than near the office. My ratings: Location:9, Views: 10 for prime sites, going down to 7 for other perimeter sites, and 4 for interior. The campground itself gets a 4.
04/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Sites are nicely spaced for an RV park with grass lawns, picnic tables and a lounge chair. It is situated in a scenic, bucolic valley that can heat up nicely compared to other areas of the Redwoods region. You can probably get satellite here because it is not amongst the big tree area. The 9-hole golf course is a great amenity; the starter's desk is the same as the RV park check-in, so you can walk from your site. It is a fun course. The Benbow Inn is along a trail that goes under Hwy 101. It has an upscale restaurant. For other choices you have to drive to Garberbille. There is some highway noise, but not terrible. It's a good, well-run operation, I would stay here again.
04/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park isn't much to look at, but it is located adjacent to a beautiful bluff top park with views out to the ocean. We saw Grey whales go by both nights. One problem is that the 5 best view sites in the front row have no sewer hookup and there is no dump station. The other 5 view sites do have sewer. It seems to be mostly full timers here except for most of the sites in the front row. There's no Wi-Fi but you can get Wi-Fi in front of the Super 8 Hotel across the street. I would stay here again, it is centrally located to tour the Mendocino Coast, close to Ft. Bragg amenities, & has a great view for a good price.
04/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
We used to love coming to this park. It was rundown, but for $20-$25, we could be right next to the dramatic surf of the Oregon coast in the front row of this campground, one of the best settings available. Even in that rundown, unpaved, muddy state, it was a perfect 10 in our opinion mostly due to the combination of price and its fabulous setting near the Yachats coast. Now it is completely renovated with huge concrete pads, updated utilities including 50amp & Wi-Fi, and a nice new clubhouse. However, this is the beginning of the end, since the pads will soon be for sale. The pad owners will be able to put park models on their sites, and they will be available for rent if the owners allow. If they leave the sites vacant, then the sites will still be available for RV camping to the general public. However, if the awesome front row gets filled with park models, that will ruin most of the ocean view for any remaining sites. The price is already too high, with $60(summer)/ $50 (winter) in the front row, $50/$45 in the side rows, and $45/$35 in just a couple of sites in the back. Since the place was virtually empty on an April Monday, the cheap site worked out just fine providing an awesome panoramic view with no RVs blocking it, and we are enjoying what may just be our last opportunity to stay at one of our favorite spots. We saw dolphins, Grey whales and a great sunset. Goodbye (???) Sea Perch, we'll miss ya.
04/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park is situated in a good central location to tour the Redwoods (although it is not in the Redwoods itself), and after driving by the other camps in Klamath it seems like the nicest. Beware of a sharp turn to enter the park though. Make sure to drive along the Coast Road (narrow, gravel, no trailers) to Prarie Creek State Park from here. They opened early (mid-April) because of dry weather so there were only 3 rigs here on a weekend. If it were like this all the time I'd rate it a 9, but if it were full things would be tight with rigs close together which I dislike. Motorhomes have the advantage because they can back up into the front row sites and have a view of the river, which is really beautiful, even when the fog rolls in. The Wi-Fi worked fine but I hate when places charge for it ($5+.day). We even got Dish satellite to work despite the adjacent mountain, and they have cable TV (limited channels). Staff was very nice. There are still no amenities in Klamath, so stock up before arriving. They charged $19 with Passport America, no tax. Would definitely stay here again. I can't comment on other problems regarding power and wet ground as others mentioned as we did not run into those problems.
04/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
A 7 is the highest rating that I give a parking-lot style RV park with units crammed in together. However, because we had slide outs & they were not full, they assigned us two spots which helped. Motorhomes have an advantage here since when you back in you can actually see pretty green hills (in spring anyway) above the other rigs from many sites. A couple of sites also have views out to the large adjacent wetland preserve, which dog owners will love for long walks. There is also a pretty good animal hospital adjacent. We have two laptops, and the new wifi worked great on one and not that well on the other. We were 3/4 down the row away from the office. Satellite worked fine with no obstructions, & they have extensive cable TV. Office staff was very accommodating and friendly. The reason we stay here is location - 20 minutes to Oakland/East Bay or The City. It's a 1 mile walk to the Larkspur-downtown SF pedestrian/bike ferry but the price has skyrocketed since our last visit ($14.20 roundtrip) making it much cheaper to drive if you can find free on street parking. Marin county is beautiful and there are fabulous parks all over. This is our second stay here and because of the location and amenities we'll probably keep coming back.
03/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
I liked this quiet, peaceful park that served as a very nice stopover while cruising. $32 seemed a bit high for being in the middle of nowhere, but I guess some people come here to explore the wine country. (?) It was less expensive than the other option. The staff was nice and arranged for a nice pull-through for us for our late arrival, giving us two sites to accomplish this. The camp was quiet and in a bucolic setting with some small trees around, but none to block our satellite. The free Wi-Fi worked great, and we stayed through noon the next day to use it. There are alot of full-time residents, but that aspect seemed perfectly fine here. I did not use the facilities, so can't comment on that. It's several miles into town, and we found the best Mexican buffet for the money ($7 lunch $8-$10 brunch/dinner): Marisco's 7 Puertas. Lots of savory meats and shrimp. From the exit for Hwy 46, head west toward the fast food area, but make an immediate right down a frontage road past Carl's Jr. My ranking would have been higher if the price was lower, if there were spectacular view sites, and if the sites were larger with more privacy. (ie: I'm not a fan of RV parks). I would stay here again.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
I liked this campground. I chose it because of a 1-night-free special they had running in the off season on their website, hence the $16 average price. Oakhurst is a good base to explore the region since it has lots of restaurants and shopping. It is not High Sierra as the name indicates, but “Low Sierra,” about 2,800 ft elevation, so it can be hot in the summer. The drive to Yosemite Valley is a long hour on a good but very curvy road, which is similar to the other Yosemite portals. The park entrance and Mariposa Grove (open summer only), is only 20 minutes away, but it’s much further to the main attraction. If you plan on several days in Yosemite Valley, it’s much more enjoyable to actually stay in the Valley if you can put up with the curvy drive in your RV and can get reservations at the primitive camps. We planned only one day in the park this time, so staying in Oakhurst was perfect for us. The High Sierra staff was very friendly and helpful. They gave us alternate instructions compared to our GPS which saved us from a steep hill and speed bumps that you encounter if you take the signed entrance from Hwy 41. We were put in a row of overnighter sites next to the office that looked out over the tent sites (vacant at the time) that are lower and next to the Fresno River. The river runs next to the campground, more like a large stream actually, but others have written that they have enjoyed dipping in the swimming holes. Unfortunately, across the river at the same level as the campground is not pristine mountain scenery, but a large municipal warehouse. Our view was the narrow river below, the warehouse, and some small mountains beyond, which was perfectly fine. The sites are back-in so motorhomes face away from the view. For only two nights we opted to pull in forward and not connect the sewer so we could have more of a vista, which the staff allowed. The sites are average width with no privacy between them, and have a picnic table and fire ring. There is a full-timer section higher up on the property, but from what I could see it seemed perfectly fine and separate from the overnight section. They may have more overnight sites up there, but I believe they fill up the sites near the office first with the overnighters. The campground was very peaceful and quiet, with only the sound of the river and the starry sky above, and no freeway, train, airplane or industrial noise that you are exposed to at most campgrounds. There are trees around the camp but most sites should have no problem getting satellite. Best of all for me since I needed to do some research while here, the free wifi worked great. I didn't use the facilities, so can't comment on that. All in all, a big thumbs up. If it weren’t for the warehouse facility across the river, the view situation for motorhomes, and the smallish sites with no privacy (typical for RV park), I would have given this camp a 9 or 10.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
It is awesome to be able to park parallel to the ocean along Rincon Parkway, the waves crashing non-stop outside of the window. The waves are so loud if fact that it even masks the fairly frequent trains that run on the other side of the road. I especially love watching the white pelicans fly by and the dolphins, while looking out over the glistening ocean to the Channel Islands (assuming it's not foggy). The beach is really nice to walk along with fairly good wave break, althouh the sand disappears at high tide. The water is so close to the road that it would not be the place to be during a big storm or a tsunami! Another plus is the access to awesome biking along the Class II Rincon Parkway, and 5 miles toward Ventura start a series of Class I (ie off road) easy bike trails that go along the Ventura waterfront, and all the way to Ojai. Or, cycle into lovely downtown Ventura. We had been here 10 years ago (when the cost was around $10) and thoroughly enjoyed it. This time, unfortunately, we stayed here on Easter weekend, and were not here to party, but instead to find a place to camp in the area on one of the busiest camping weekends. We arrived Thursday noon and grabbed one of only 10 remaining sites (out of 150 or so). Rigs practically kiss each other end to end, so every inch of your site is gold. On one side of us, a large group had a huge bonfire on their site pad next to the rocks (which is not allowed) and were so loud in the afternoon and evening that we could barely hear the waves! This was one time we didn't feel guilty running our diesel generator for several hours in the evening. They left a huge mess of ashes and beer cans. Perhaps the $25 fee goes toward cleaning up after people like that, because there are no amenities except for a few port-a-potties and trash dumpsters. The posted rules say nothing about 'quiet hours,' only that vehicles must be self contained and fires must be in a commercial bbq. There are no camp hosts, only rangers who only seem to come by if someone hasn't paid their fees, so it is like staying in a lawless wild west town. I assume most weekends and holidays as well as all summer long are like this here. I hate places with too many rules, but this is what happens when you have no controls. I will only stay here again on a weekend if I am with a large group myself, or else during a nice quiet winter weekday for some wonderful oceanside solitude.
01/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is the most beautiful option for RV camping in the Tucson area, set amidst the amazing Sonoran desert of Tucson Mountain Park with plenty of Saguaros. There is a 7-day limit. It is a short drive to the MUST SEE Sonoran Desert Museum, and the west section of Saguaro National Park. Ignore the directions to get to the park via I-10 to I-19 if you are coming from the Phoenix area. Use the roads from the Marana area exits instead. Note that RV's are not allowed on Speedway over Gates Pass, but once you are situated and can drive your toad or truck, that is a scenic shortcut into town. The camp has nice spacious sites with picnic tables. The most scenic loop is Loop A, but our experience is that they keep that loop closed until the other loops are full, which just drives us crazy. The best sites are around the perimeter, but most sites are fine. Larger rigs (over 30 feet) will have much less availability and selection. Hookups are 30 amp electric only. There is a dump station available and a water fill station. There are restrooms but no showers. Several taps are scattered around the park, so you may be able to fill up at those, but you cannot remain connected. We camped with friends here, and they were given a hard time. People complained that their dog barked inside their RV when they were gone and left notes on their door. Then they got a citation for putting bird food on a cactus, and then a lecture for leaving bird seed on the ground because a camp host once had a problem with pack rats when they left their coach vacant for a month. In contrast, we dealt with very helpful staff in the Visitors Center, which is only open during the peak winter season. We can recommend L'Il Abners steakhouse in Marana for amazing and reasonable ribs and steak, and the Tucson municipal golf course Crooked Tree near Marana which is very scenic, well kept, challenging and only $18 in off-peak times, one of the best values we've experienced for such a course. We loved the tram ride/hike up Sabino Canyon (no dogs) and riding our bikes around the Cactus Forest scenic loop in the east section of the National Park (also no dogs). The closest wifi was at a library about 20 minutes away on Ajo Pkwy. A great supermarket is Food City, Basha's Mexican-oriented market, across from the library.
01/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
We planned on staying here 2 nights and ended up staying 5. We had just begun a month-long caravan with friends in another rig and this made for an excellent start. A highlight was our evening campfire at our site beneath a giant Saguaro cactus with my cowboy music playing into the night. Sites are very large set within beautiful Sonoran desert flora. Bird life was amazing, and coyotes howled nightly. A true wild west experience just outside of Phoenix. A fabulous, easy mountain bike ride through the desert is close by in the park, and the hike to Wind Cave is one of the most popular in the Phoenix area. Staff was friendly, and the showers were fine, which was appreciated since with no sewer hookup we had to conserve water to avoid a mid-stay dump (there is a dump station here). A brand new freeway (Loop 202)into Mesa and Phoenix is only a few minutes away. Next time we have to stay in the Phoenix area we will bipass those yucky RV parks in town and stay here, sewer hookup or not.
02/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
San Mateo is the inland campground portion of San Onofre State Park, whereas the Bluffs campground is a summer-only primitive camp along the driveway of the beach campground. San Clemente State Beach is nearby but is a different park altogether. Note that only a few of the Bluffs sites have ocean views, but all are within a nice trail to the long, beautiful beach. San Mateo campground is several miles from the Bluffs portion of the park. This camp is 1+ miles inland from the beaches, down Christianitos Road, an access road to Camp Pendleton Marine Base. San Mateo camp has one section for electric-water hookup sites, and several loops for primitive sites. There is a double dump station in the camp. The sites are mostly very spacious and more private than most campgrounds, with lawns, trees and shrubs, ample picnic tables and fire pits. The perimeter sites look out onto a beautiful riparian wilderness area. This also means that your small pets are in danger if left outside unattended. I have seen coyotes roaming the campground and I was thrilled one day when a bobcat (not a cougar) emerged from the brush and went under my rig. Mostly though you will see lots of rabbits. This camp has availability more frequently than nearby San Clemente State Beach, which is booked most weekends and all summer. However, hookup sites sell out on many weekends and holidays and during the summer here as well so site-specific reservations are suggested for those. Now the negatives (besides no sewer hookups) – a firing range is close to the site, and the sound of gunfire echoes through the camp most weekends and some evenings. Finally, the bombing practice at Camp Pendleton can be heard very clearly here. Besides all that, enjoy, you’re in a great location to explore the area from!
02/2008
rating [ 5/10 ]
We tried out this park because they had a vacancy on President's Day weekend and accepted our Passport America on a holiday for a half price rate ($25) which is admirable. For what it is, they do a good job here. It is well run and friendly, with very well maintained facilities. The wifi worked great, and the cable TV has HBO, which is good because the eucalyptus trees blocked our fixed roof satellite. It is RV Park living with sites close together and unappealing gravel areas with picnic tables, which we had no desire to spend any time at. The setting was nicer than I expected though - it is at the north end of Santa Fe St., in a scenic valley next to a riparian stream ecosystem which they utilize for their dog walk area (watch for poison oak!). Adjacent is an industrial park, so activity there shuts down after work and it felt safe here. Santa Fe St. is a designated bike route, and the street ends just to the north and becomes the Rose Creek Bike Trail that connects to Gilman Rd in the La Jolla area. We were camped in the interior row, and just looked out onto other rigs, which I hate. The sites next to the stream would be much more desirable, especially for motorhomes that could back in and look out and have a pleasant view. The noise is the biggest drawback here, as it is next to I-5 which echoes through this valley with a thunderous roar. With our well-insulated coach it diminished to steady white noise, but once we stepped outside, wow! There is also a train track across the stream, which is fairly active, but is no match for the highway noise! We would return here if Campland was full or not accepting PA, but we would try and get a more desirable site.
02/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
I stayed in a basic spot on winter weekdays that rent for $49, but they accepted my Passport America (PA) card for half price, which surprised me because of all the restrictions on PA use. Although I was down row L in a crowded parking-lot type site, we had a glimpse of the bay down the row since the adjacent site was vacant. The front-row bayfront sites have awesome views of Mission Bay and San Diego, but they are expensive. I stayed in them once when I was in town on business (not having to pay, and staying in those particular sites I would give the place a '9'). Even though the basic sites are crowded and sometimes claustrophobic, you can easily get out and within a short walk or bike are the Mission Bay beach and pleasant resort grounds and facilities. Prepare for lots of kids on days when school is out, and for limited availability in summer and winter weekends and holidays at this popular park. I am an avid biker and love to ride from the park mostly on bayfront bike trails to the ocean boardwalk in Mission Beach in less than 30 minutes, or do the 14-mile easy circuit around the Bay in 2 hours. For dining out and groceries, nearby Garnet Street is the key (turn left), with every kind of restaurant you could want, plus the excellent food markets Trader Joe's and Henry's. The staff was friendly, and let me check out my satellite in a few sites prior to finalizing my check in. There are varying amounts of trees throughout the resort which may cause a problem for your satellite. So, all in all, it's a huge RV park but with a friendly resort atmosphere rather than a trailer park atmosphere. It is very expensive for a campground, but you are paying for the prime location right on Mission Bay and the facilities. And, you get what you pay for with the type of sites you book. I have enjoyed my stays here.
02/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is one of my favorite places to RV camp anywhere. I just love the feeling here, it's like going back in time to a stretch of California coast before it was developed. You can walk for miles along a beautiful beach. (And dogs are allowed on the beach but PLEASE pick up after them!!) Not to mention a hamburger stand with pretty good food and a general store in the middle of nowhere! The highest-tier hookup sites (electric only with water spigots nearby to fill up) where I always stay have awesome views up and down the coast. They are close together but who cares with such a view out the front, and a picnic table at the edge of view cliff! I am a writer and get really great ideas while staying here. It's always hard to leave. I'm just grateful for the privilege to camp here, and I overlook the shortcomings of some of the other reviewers, which, unfortunately are still true. The 15-mile road to get here should only be attempted by skilled RV drivers. It is hilly, windy, and usually in disrepair, though at least there is not much traffic. Since there are no reservations, you may be making that drive for nothing. You may want to stay instead at Flying Flags in Buellton and visit Jalama as a day trip. For us, since we are a 34-ft motorhome, there are only a few hookup sites that we fit into, which increases the risk for us since we make the long trip to get here for our panoramic view. We will only go on a winter weekday, and still call the park's daily recording first to get an idea of how crowded it is. If you are very lucky a ranger will answer the phone to give you a better idea. The campground did seem fairly poorly maintained, although the rangers were very friendly when we were here. Also, active train tracks run adjacent to the campground, although the wonderful sound of the surf screens it out fairly well. The fees have gone up in recent years, now up to (for hookups) $30/$28 senior or travel club plus $3 per dog.
02/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
Location, location, location. Morro Bay is a wonderful destination, and from this camp you can ride your bike into town, rent kayaks, explore the wetlands, and play golf at the adjacent ocean-view, challenging public course, that we paid $20 for off-peak. We had great February weather, with none of the infamous fog. The park is set amongst Monterey Pine trees, and there are only a precious few hookup sites, that are full much of the time on reservations, even on many winter weekdays. The non-hookup sites are easier to get, except on some weekends and during the summer. Those are actually nicer, more spacious sites. Be warned that the trees may just block your satellite at many of the sites. Supposedly the front row hookups and the '50's (dry) are good for satellites, but our Dish worked from both sites we stayed at (#14 hookups $29, and #83 dry $20). There are no sewer hookups, and the single dump station, which also services Montana de Oro campground, can have a lineup. So, reserve early and enjoy a top-notch destination and very pleasant campground.
01/2008
rating [ 1/10 ]
We stayed here because of the $10 Passport America rate as we were passing through the area. We were with friends in another rig, and the two available "Passport America" sites left were the worst in the park. The dog walk access is between the two sites - the access consisting of a break in the shrubbery with passage to the adjacent railroad right of way. Well, many of the dog owners didn't bother to make it past our sites, as they were littered with dog crap. Our friends, also dog owners, were so disgusted they had to clean it up right away beforre putting out their table. Besides the disturbance of dog walkers through our site (which made our friend's dog bark wildly each time) the proximity to the very active train tracks, complete with switching activities, made it almost impossible to sleep. The manager made us pay for 2 nights minimum using Passport America, but we left after one night. He didn't seem surprised. The campground was a mix of nice 'snowbird' units and run down full-timer units. The manager was friendly enough, and the outdoor washer/dryers worked well. The park is in the old rundown section of Wellton, but there is some new development with restaurants and golf courses a few minutes drive away. The only redeeming factor would have been nice, inexpensive golf courses nearby, but with all the snowbirds (staying at the nicer parks) we couldn't even get a tee time. Big thumbs down.
11/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is a gem - large, spacious sites (in some of the loops) and an easy trail to one of the best birding places in Arizona. We stay here for a few days at a time only, since there are no sewer hookups. Some of the upper sites have big, sweeping views of the Verde Valley. Unfortunately for my health, the awesome Hog Wild restaurant, where you can get an awesome freshly smoked pork loin dinner the size of Rhode Island for $9, is located near the turnoff to the park.
12/2007
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is ultra-convenient during my winter visits of nearby relatives. It is located on a bluff above the fabulous San Clemente Beach, which makes for amazing walks and great surfing (Requires a 10-minute walk down a fairly steep incline to the beach). Fisherman's restaurant at the pier is awesome and only 25 minutes walk along the beach. Sites have full hookups and 50 amps. Some of the sites in the front row of the hookup area have an awesome 'Catalina Sunset' view, but they are also the shortest of the sites, and sometimes they get picky about not letting you park your car on the dirt. The negatives - sites are fairly close together; besides the front row there is no view except if the place is uncrowded; it is full just about every weekend all year, and all summer days, booked months in advance, it can be a major hassle to try and camp here without reservations - they make people come back the next morning, wait in lines, do ridiculous raffles, etc. And getting in and out of the park can be time consuming if there is an incompetent and/or inconsiderate gatehouse attendant. Warning - the ATT wifi only works halfway consistently near the gate house, is expensive, and is not maintained well by the staff.
12/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
I use this, and the two State parks in San Clemente, as a homebase while exploring the area and visiting relatives. I stay here only when the oceanfront sites are available to get an awesome view of beach and surf, and access to great beach walks and bike rides. Location next to San Juan Creek makes for high bacterial count, but also lots of shorebirds. Since there are no hookups, feel free to orient your rig for best view; I'm shocked that 75% of the motorhomes back in at the beachfront. Many sites have vegetation between them, but otherwise it is a crowded camp and noisy because of kids, trains, and generators (since there are no hookups).
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