206486 User submitted reviews online!!
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Thursday, Friday – June 28-29 Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland. This is one of our favorite places to stay, just a dune away from the ocean. There are two loops near the ocean, plus tent sites in the sand and more loops on the Bayside of the park. We have never camped here in June when the flies come out. The Bayside Loops are not the place to be when they do. The Oceanside Loops have a nice breeze which controls them, but they are still there. This is just a beautiful park with wild horses that come into your site and on the beaches. Hiking, biking and windsurfing on the Bayside. We saw more horses than we do in April or May, because they are trying to get away from the flies by escaping to the main road, Oceanside Loops and the beach. It is a beautiful long beach with a public beach to the north of it and one to the south, but the section in front of the camping loop never really gets crowded. There are no hookups, but there is water, cold showers and clean pit toilets in each loop. We had a thunderstorm around ten last night for about an hour, so some of the tenters left this morning. Tenters need extra long stakes to stay here. It’s a great place to camp and it cost us $10 a night with a pass. Reservations can be made online on the recreation.gov website. Beautiful place and the wild horses just add to the whole atmosphere. Another park is just to the north of this park, so don’t confuse the two!
06/2013
rating [ 3/10 ]
Sunday, June 23 – Poplar Point Campground, Jordan Lake State Recreation Area, Apex, NC. This recreational area is just 30 miles southwest of Raleigh on Route 64. There are day use areas with beaches, three big camping areas – Parker’s Creek, Poplar Point and Crosswinds Campground, hike in camping, group tent camping, and group RV camping. They even have some sites for camping with horses. We stayed at Poplar Point which has 579 sites for RV and tent camping and now 363 of the sites have water and electric hookups. There is a picnic table, grill and lantern holder at each site. There are many loops here B-J with or without electricity. We stayed here four years ago and we stayed in the F loop which was nice. This time we stayed in the C loop a reservation only loop and we had a great site C15 overlooking and on the water, but most of the sites in the C loop are not right on the water. We were at the bottom of the hill so hiked to get to the bathhouse which on a Sunday afternoon when we arrived. Not that clean, but that is to be expected. This lake is very popular with locals for boating and camping especially on weekends. Check out is 3pm and check in is 4pm, so arriving before 2 the bathhouses had been well used. Our site had a little beach which the previous campers left plastic bottles, soda cans and plastic bags all over it. We did clean it up, but refused to pick up all the cigarette butts. Another problem we had this time is that no one can leave the campground until 8 am in the morning. We wanted to head out around 6 am to drive through Raleigh before the morning traffic and to the NC shore. The last time we were here some of our neighbors left early to go to work, but this time the rangers said it was not possible. We have been camping for five months from RI to CA and this is the first campground where we could not leave. They stated that this is the policy of NC state parks, so it looks like we won’t be staying at anymore if we need to travel early. So because of this policy I rated this campground lower then I have before or would have on this trip. It costs us $19 with a reservation fee and a senior discount of $6. It is really a nice area to camp, but you just can’t get out!
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Saturday, June 22 – Pisgah National Forest, Lake Powhatan Recreation Area, Asheville, NC. This campground is located on the west side of Asheville off of route 191 and near the entrance of the Blue Ridge Parkway. There are five loops in the park and this time we stayed in the Big John Loop. It was shaded and we did have electricity, but only one of two sites have electric in this loop. Bent Creek Loop across from our loop has about four sites with electric. Hardtimes Loop – no electric and the loop closer to the lake, but you still have a long walk to get to it was the Lakeside Loop. Right now most of Lakeside Loop have water and sewers and hopefully by 2014 all the sites in this loop will be full hookups. The Lakeside Loop has some huge sites for big RV’s. It cost us with electricity $25, but if you have a pass take 50% off and if you reserve add a reservation fee of $9. You can reserve some of the sites in this park and the others first come except this is a very popular park. This park is beautiful and there is so much to see and do in Ashville and the Blue Ridge Parkway. One can bike, hike and swim in Lake Powhatan. Check in was quick and the host was informative about what to see and do in the area. Bath houses were clean and the showers were great! We were headed east and have stayed here before, so it was just a one night stopover for us, but a nice stop on a beautiful day in June.
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Thursday, June 20 – Deer Run RV Resort, Crossville, TN This was a one night stopover as we were heading back east on our way home. It is a Passport America park good for Sunday – Thursday nights. We called when we were about an hour away, and the woman on the phone was very friendly and informative. Told me the cost with the pass at $17.80 for full hookups, Wi-Fi and cable but must be paid in cash for one night. When we arrived and checked in, she had everything ready to go and was just as informative and friendly. The check in was at the office, store and deli and the entrance is gated. Nice drive in but there is a big section of permanent sites and then sites for overnights or longer on this side of the lake. Driving around the lake there is another area for overnighters and tenters. There are three bathhouses, a pool, beach, cabins, pavilion, basketball courts, tennis courts, horseshoes, shuffleboard, boat launch area (non motor) and a chapel. A very nice place to stay for one night or longer. You can walk around the lake and we did have a thunderstorm when we were there and our site drained quickly. Good stop and I am sure that if we are traveling on interstate 40 again, we will stop for another overnight.
06/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Friday, June 21 – Douglas Reservoir – Douglas Dam Headwater Campground, Sevierville, TN This is a TVA self-service campground. Sixty five campsites and 61 with water and electric hookups. We checked in on a Friday afternoon. First, we had gone down the road to another TVA campground Douglas Dam Tailwater Campground but there was nothing available. Some sites at these TVA campgrounds almost looked like permanents. So we headed back up the road and checked this one out. When we crossed the highway we could see the campground just below the dam and it looked like it was full. We decided to drive down and check it out and we found a small site that we could have fit in but a large RV was at the dump station and had just left a nice site right on the river with hookups. So we stayed the night with a nice view of the dam and downstream. We were lucky to get a spot. It is a self check in campground so we had to fill out the form and put cash in the envelope to put in the box. With a Golden Age pass, the $22 per site was 50% off to make it $11. Nice stop, but we were in driving range of interstate 40, Pigeon Forge and Smokey Mts National Park that the traffic on the highways was busy so I don’t know if we would ever stop again. This is a tourist area and very crowded. The campground was full but it was very enjoyable and peaceful. The restrooms had heated showers and flush toilets. There was a dump station, picnic tables, boat ramp, walking trail, wildlife viewing area, bird watching and a swimming beach (I don’t know about swimming in the river because we found a lot of trash and dead fish in it right in front of our site).
06/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Tuesday, June 18 – Graceland RV Park and Campground, Memphis, TN This campground is right next to Graceland, the home of Elvis Presley on Elvis Presley Blvd. It is easy to get to, but you turn on Lonely Lane the street before the turn for general parking into Graceland. It cost us $35 with tax for a water and electric site on gravel with Wi-Fi, pool, bike and walking trails, dog run, cabins, camping store, full hookups, and for a fee - shuttles to Beale Street. There is even a restaurant that will pick you up and return at your site in a pink limo after four for free. Actually, the price was not bad considering that if you park at Graceland there is a $15 fee for parking RV’s and $10 for cars, so the site really cost us $20. Easy to walk to Heartbreak Hotel and Graceland about five minutes and visiting Graceland one should plan on spending at least four hours or more, but it can be done in about two. The lady who checked us in was very informative and made sure we knew about shuttles, where to eat and what discounts we were eligible for at Graceland. This was a one night stop for us and we were able to do it because we arrived at the campground around 10 in the morning. It was great to spend a day with “The King”.
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is right on the river so that you can enjoy watching the barges as they head north or south. The costs depends on what type of site you have river, cement, tent, full hookups, w & e etc. Our cost on a gravel 30 amp site on the river with full hookups was $32 with a Good Sam discount. It was a nice campground and they have a lot of sites that will fit a huge RV and car. The bathhouse is small and the laundry only has two machines for washing and drying but it was free. Check in was fast and informative and the young girl gave us some coupons for attractions in the Memphis Area. Follow the directions from their website using the new truck bypass route off of interstate 40 and 55. Very easy that way. The camper next to us came in off 270 and said the neighborhood was not the best and he was glad that he did not break down. We were there for just an overnight but enjoyed our stay and would return if we are in the area again. It was in the mid 90’s when we came in and did not need air conditioning because of the shade in our site and the breeze off the Mississippi River.
06/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Sunday, June 16 – Maumelle COE Campground, Little Rock, AR This is a huge COE campground with five loops A-F. The A and B loops have some sites right on the Arkansas River some with 50 amps and 30 amps. It is located on the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System so it is great for boating and fishing. We had a site in the B loop but in the sun and away from the water. The bathhouse was a good distance away so we didn’t use it. Sites were clean with water and electricity, picnic table and fire pits. There is a courtesy dock, hot showers, a boat ramp and playground. We were only here for a one night stopover. It costs us with a pass $12.
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is located at 305 Gorge Road not downtown where the National Park Visitor Center is. There are 39 sites in the park, some of them with full hookups but no showers. There used to be showers here but they were taken out because of abuse from outsiders, and full hookups were put in. It is a pretty campground on the creek where one can cool off. There are modern bath houses and water is available for registered campers. All the sites are back in and there is a size limit posted where you register by machine but the camper next to us put his 35 foot RV in a 25 foot slot including his car which was placed on the grass. It costs $10 a site and $24 for a site with full hookups but with a pass it is half that. The hostess was very helpful and informative. There is a trail about a mile and a half to bathhouse row in town but to drive in it takes about fifteen minutes. There is no parking in town for an RV at the National Park Visitor Center so ask the host for ideas where to park. We parked across from the National Park Administrative Building and on weekends there is no fee, but I asked a police woman and she said there was no parking for RVs at all in town. She was cold and not helpful at all. Needless to say, we waited a few minutes until the visitor center opened up and they said where we were was fine –there are four RV, Bus Tour slots right next to the old visitor center that you can park at. There is a little conflict with the park and the locals because nowhere are there signs that parking is free on weekends so some people were paying. This was a two night stopover for us on a weekend. The hostess told us that it doesn’t always fill up but if you want full hookups and arrive late you might have to pull in to some of the sites that are not level. Good stop. We enjoyed the historic section of Hot Springs and had a nice walking tour by a park ranger explaining Bathhouse Row and how the park became a National Park.
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Thursday, June 13 - Aux Arc, Ozark Lake, COE, Ozark, AR This is an Army Corp of Engineer campground on Ozark Lake right near the town of Ozark, AR. There are 60 sites open all year with electric some with 50amp and water hookups. There is a dump station, showers and restrooms. Most of the sites sit right on the shoreline and every site has a view. Sites are shady situated in the tall trees. The Ozark Lake goes 36 miles along the Arkansas River. Along the shoreline one can find steep bluffs, tree lined banks, open farmlands and level fields. You can visit the lock and dam one mile southeast. This campground is right near the Arkansas Wine Trail along 186 and 64 and the town of Altus which is the Wine Capitol of Arkansas. Nice area and an easy drive to Hot Springs down the Moonshine Scenic Byway route 7. There are six COE managed camping areas on Ozark Lake. Nice overnight at this campground. Cost was $9 with pass.
06/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Wednesday, June 12 - Eufaula Lake – Belle Starr Campground, Corps of Engineers, Eufaula, OK. The reviews have always been good for this campground, and I love the COE campgrounds, but I can see where the funding is just not there anymore. There are 115 sites with electric and some of them 50 amp and many have water hookups. The site we had was right on the lake but small with no water hookups. There was another site right to the left of us, and if any RV came in we would have been blocked from getting out but it did not happen. This is one of the biggest lakes in OK, and very windy, and it looks like it has the red clay underneath it. The nicest sites are the pull-throughs right next to the water sites C22-32, but those are first come. Reservations can be made for some of the sites. Tables to cut up your fish were at every site since this is a big fishing lake. Bath houses were not that clean, but it was in the late afternoon when we checked them out on a very hot day in the high 90’s. We followed the directions, but we missed a small sign to get to the park so it took longer to get there off of Interstate 40 than we planned. Nice park, but I don’t know if we would return since there are also 8 other COE campgrounds around this lake and some state parks. It only costs us $9 with a pass for the site.
06/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Monday & Tuesday, June 10 & 11 Rockwell RV Park, Oklahoma City, OK. This park is in Oklahoma City and right off exit 143 on Interstate 40. You can get on the highway and go anywhere except we found these interstates in OK City are so confusing. It was not an easy city to get around. They do offer the free shuttle in town ,so we drove to the Bass Pro Shop to catch it to go downtown to the Memorial Museum. We were able to drive to the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum with plenty of parking for RV’s, a must visit. The park is huge with a lot of permanent sites, but that was not a problem. The cost with a discount was $30. At the park, check in was quick, and they do offer free a newspaper, coffee, and homemade muffins at the front desk every morning. All sites are full hookups with cable. There is is enclosed/heated swimming pool and spa, but it was not working when we were there. There is a buffalo herd fenced in on the park grounds. Sites are right next to each other, but we did have a shaded site, but not all sites are shaded. There are two bath houses, two laundry facilities, game room, shuffle board courts, basketball court, horseshoes, propane station plus. It is very convenient, but it is a crowded park.
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is located north of Interstate 40 in the western part of the OK on the largest reservoir in Panhandle. Easy drive to get to it. The park is only on part of the 60 mile lake. The dam is over three miles long and there are over eight campgrounds within the park. Prior to statehood, the area was part of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Indian Reservation, many still living in the surrounding area. The Great Western Cattle Trail also ran through the area. There is a small herd of bison still roaming a 480 pasture at the park. We drove north from the interstate for about 6.5 miles and the entrance is right to the left. You drive in and find a spot then wait until the host visits you. You really need a map to know where all the campgrounds are. It was confusing when we drove in because we did not see an entrance office but they do have one just past the park entrance. We had to ask another camper what to do. You find a spot and we did at Cedar Point Campground which has 15 semi-modern RV sites with water and electricity, most with great views of the lake. Very pretty. The host showed up within an hour and was very informative about the area, the park and gave us a map of the park itself. You pay the host $25 per night for water and electric, or $23 as a senior citizen. This campground is one of the most popular and if it wasn’t a Sunday we might not have found a site but we would have found a site somewhere in the park. There are over 137 sites, ten with full hookups and included in that count are 42 tent sites. Nice park in a beautiful area of OK. At the park one can hike, bike, horseback ride but not rental, fish, boating, and swimming . We enjoyed our day here right on the lake in a nice pull-through site with lots of shade. The bath house was nice with showers.
06/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is one of five campgrounds in Palo Duro Canyon State Park and I think the best, but it only has 30amp. Mesquite and Sagebrush campgrounds have both 30 and 50 amps and two other areas just have water. Hackberry is the second campground (Sagebrush the first) coming down the canyon before you reach the six river crossings that might have flash flooding on the Park Road. That is one of the reasons that we chose it, so that we would not get flooded out, and it is a good thing we did. During our first and second night a ranger came and warned us about ten at night that a big thunderstorm was coming through with possible hail and 70 mile per hour winds. We didn’t get the hail or the high winds on either night, but it was a thunderstorm with rain. Our site was well drained except for one section. Some campers left their rigs and headed back to the town of Canyon. We were fine. This is a pretty campground with water and electricity, shade and views of the canyon walls. Some of the sites are close together and even though you make a reservation, its first come to select your site. The canyon is beautiful but after the Visitor Center the drive down is a 10% grade with some switchbacks, but it was not a concern. The play Texas was being performed ($) Tuesday – Sunday, and it is just up the road from the campground. We went Saturday night and it was great but left early because of the storm. Cost depends on your site (primitive, water or w&e) and if you have a TX pass. We had purchased a TX pass five months ago and still had some camping coupons to use. Our first night was $24 and our second night with the coupon $12. It was a good stop but this time of year the storms are coming through this area. They have been in a drought so the rain is needed.
06/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is located to the north of Fort Sumner, six miles off of route 84. Driving down the flat grasslands of New Mexico’s eastern plains, all of a sudden you come to a dam and a huge lake. The hillsides of juniper and the blue waters of the lake with a rocky shoreline contrast with the dry, desert like drive to the campground. It costs $14 for electric and they do take reservations for some sites. The main Pecos campground where we stayed, sits up on a hill. There is a visitor center there and at the Mesquite campground which has water only. Primitive sites are available right around the lake. There are also two other areas for camping: the Pecos River campground with no hookups and the Eastside Campground that has electric but it is a first come first serve. The Pecos Campground was nice looking down on the lake with shelters for the picnic tables. The Eastside campsites are closer to the water but no showers. The bath house was clean and there was one shower. There is a trail to look down on the huge dam but the lake is dry because of the drought. The lake has 2,700 acres and there are a couple of boat docks in the park. Fishing is popular for walleye, crappie, bass and catfish. This was a one night stopover for us as we are heading back east. Fort Sumner is where Billy the Kid was killed.
06/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Tuesday, June 4 – Fawn Lakes – Carson National Forest, Red River, New Mexico. This is one of five National Forest campgrounds near Red River, New Mexico, on the Scenic Byway, the Enchanted Circle. Most of the campsites are along the river, and there are sites big enough for 30ft RV’s. The best sites are for tenters or those with vans right on the river, but all sites are close to the river. No hookups, but water is available, and the pit toilets were very clean. It is a beautiful campground located under the Ponderosa Pines with some fir and spruce trees. Everyone can hear the river running southwest, and there are some paths along the river for walking to the lake. Fawn Lake (3 acres- four little lakes) is here for fishing which is also opened up to day trippers. Beautiful lake stocked with fish. The night we were there two young women were fishing at the lake and a bear came down the other side looking for food. It is bear country so beware. They now take reservations here since last fall, and the rest are first come. The cost was $17 and half with a pass. Beautiful and peaceful stop for a night or more. The four season town of Red River is less than two miles east on Route 38 which is also on the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway. This is the most popular byway and the one that is heavily promoted in the state of New Mexico. My husband wanted to stay a week here, it was so enjoyable.
06/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Wednesday, June 5 - Storrie Lake State Park, Las Vegas, New Mexico. The park has 25 sites with electricity and water hookups. Primitive camping is also available. There were pit toilets near us, but the park does have hot showers, a dump station and potable water. We arrived during a rain and hail storm just for a stopover so we weren’t able to see everything the park offers. The park is on 82 acres and the lake is huge and great for rainbow and german brown trout fishing. I thought the lake looked dry and I was told that water is sent to Las Vegas, NV and NM due to a three year drought. Our site had a covered picnic table and looked out towards the mountains. The park has fields, boat docks, horseshoes, swimming, volleyball, windsurfing and sailboarding. It was a good stop for one night, especially since it started to rain and hail two miles before we arrived.
06/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Sunday, Monday – June 2 & 3 Taos Valley RV Park and Campground, Taos, NM This campground is right on the main route into Taos and is located right off Estes Road. There are all types of sites – tent, back in, pull throughs, 30 & 50 amp, full hookups, water & electricity. We had a back in site with a fence behind us. Sites have some plants but the sites are not secluded. The cost was $27 plus tax for just water and 30 amp. There was a playground, laundry, gift shop and propane was sold there. Bath house was clean. One could walk to a few restaurants and the Visitor Center is about a half a mile away and the historic section of Taos about two miles away. Check in was quick and informative and they have maps to show where RV parking is downtown. One could also take the bus but it is about a 2 block walk from the campground. Taos has so much to see and do and a number of great museums in the downtown section. Good stay in beautiful Taos.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
We stayed in the Juniper Campground. This is a first come campground with no hookups for $12 a night and $6 if you have a pass. The campground is right after the entrance to the park. There are three loops with picnic tables and fireplaces. Not many of the sites are level and loop C has more sites for RVs up to 30 feet and more shade. It is a beautiful place to camp. We were planning on one night and decided to stay three nights. After May 24, the shuttles are running so you can pick one up from the campground and head down to the Valley Visitor Center. In the canyon there is the Valley Visitor Center, gift shop, snack bar, administrative offices, ranger stations and many of the hikes begin from here. The Main Trail has some of the best cliff dwellings that you can see and climb into using ladders and paths. Frey Trail (2 miles) which was the old way of getting supplies and visitors into the valley starts from the campground and ends at the Long House Cliff Dwellings and it is all downhill – take the shuttle back. The Alcove trail goes to a dwelling inside a cave that one can access by climbing three long ladders. The campground always has a nice breeze during the day and at night. We were there for a weekend and it was not full on any night. There is a new Visitor Center on route 4 in White Rocks that opened in the fall and it has 16 slots with hookups for RVs in the parking lot. It was free but now that they have a self check booth just like Juniper campground. It costs $10 but once campers find out about it the price might change. The shuttles come to this visitor center so if you have an oversize RV you might want to stay here. Juniper campground is about 8 miles away from visiting Los Alamos driving 4 west than 501 – one of the best ways to get into the city. You will have to go through security to get to the downtown because you are driving through the LA National Laboratory where the Manhattan Project was born. Driving in they searched our RV (our choice we didn’t want to take the longer way with more curves) and driving back we were escorted. Two great museums in town (all museums free), the Bradbury Science Museum and the Los Alamos History Museum. The history of the town is fascinating and Juniper Campground is a great place to camp while you are touring the area.
05/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
May 28 & 29, Tuesday and Wednesday – Los Suenos De Santa Fe RV Park, Santa Fe, NM: This campground is located right on Cerrillos Road in Santa Fe so you can take the city bus ($1.00 senior pass for riding the bus all day) in front of the park right down to the Plaza. Then you can walk around and visit this historic district and even walk over to the capitol which has exhibits that are very interesting. Everyone on the bus was very helpful and many seem to know each other. When anyone got off the majority thanked the driver, I have never seen that before. The campground is near a bike trail, and if you follow the GPS it gets you to it, but look closely or you might miss the entrance like we did. The park has full hookups, some pull -throughs, a pool, laundry and clean bath house. Check in was easy and they give you information about what to see and do and information on the bus schedule. We arrived on a Tuesday so the park at this time of year was not full, but most weekends they are. Reservations are advised and the name of this park has changed since we made our reservations. It used to be Los Campos Santa Fe, so the new owner has owned it for a little over a year. Great place to stay, but you are paying for location and convenience (Good Sam discount $35.70). There is so much to see and do in Santa Fe.
05/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Monday, May 27 – Cochiti lake COE Campground, Pena Blanca, NM This campground is located within the boundaries of the Pueblo de Cochiti Indian Reservation. The COE leases the land where they built the dam and two public recreation areas. Cochiti is on the west side of the lake and Tetilla Peak on the east side. Cochiti seems to be more developed and has the boat ramp and a pueblo and beautiful golf course just a mile or two passed the campground. You can see this dam as you are driving up route 22 to the campground and it looks like just a wall of dirt. It is one of the ten largest earth fill dams in the US and World. The lake and dam are surrounded by a desert environment with scrubland. It is a wake free lake and sailing and wind surfing are popular. There are four loops two with electric and water and two without. Buffalo Loop with electric and water seems to be the most popular and was filled when we arrived on Memorial Day to our site. Checkout time is at 2, so we had to wait until our site was vacant. There are some sites that look over the lake and most have a view of some part of the lake and even the Tetilla Peak Campground across the lake. It is a nice campground and I know that many of the campgrounds in this area have posted for hosts to no avail. We never saw a host but it was Memorial Day and we never saw anyone at check in or clean the bathroom and showers. It was disgusting. I blame the campers as well as the campground because it looked full for the holiday weekend with a number of sites having more than two cars and ten people, so the facilities were overwhelmed. Toilet paper was thrown all over the stalls and the showers were moldy, hairy with tubes and papers on the floor. In five months of camping we have never seen the bathrooms look like this and I love COE campgrounds. I hope it was just because of the Holiday. One other camper told us that they have been there for a week and the bathhouses were wonderful. The Visitor Center was also closed.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is about ten miles south of Albuquerque located on the Isleta Pueblo. We stopped for two nights since it was Memorial Weekend and we were worried about finding a place to stay. When we arrived in the early afternoon there were still spots available but by 7 all sites had been taken. The cost was $36 for full hookups with cable and Wifi (the best). There are two sections and the one we were in the picnic tables and cover were placed so far away from where the RV’s have to park to hookup that we didn’t use it. I noticed the second section that is newer, they fixed that problem. No reservations here. Check in was easy and friendly. There are two lakes Turtle and Sunrise that are stocked with catfish for fishing and opened to the public. A tribal permit is needed and one can get that at the check-in building with the store. There is a limit on how many fish you can catch. Bath house was clean. The casino (Hard Rock Hotel & Casino) and golf course are right up the road and interstate 25 is within a mile. It was a good stop, but our site was used to get to the store so we had campers walking right by our door with no regard to our privacy. They should build a path to the store so this does not happen. Good place to stay if visiting the Albuquerque area. A Buffalo Herd is fenced in right next to the campground.
05/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Thursday, May 23 – Root 66 RV Park, Sun Valley (Holbrook) AZ. This is a campground right off interstate 40 at exit 294 in the eastern part of the state. It is a small park with sites right next to each other with full hookups. It is run by a nice family and we checked in early in the morning so that we could spend the day at the Petrified Forest National Park about 17 miles north off interstate 40. We were coming from the west so it was easier to get a site in the morning and then drive to the park and take the park road from the north entrance to the south entrance and pick up 180 north to Holbrook and back to the campground. Holbrook is a great place to get gas with reasonable prices. This is a Passport America park so the cost was $16.50. Showers are extra and there is not much to do in the campground. It is a good overnight stop right off the highway and you can hear the cars and trucks from your site. There is 24 hour check in and checkout is at noon. It is a safe place to camp with reasonable costs. If we were traveling through AZ again and needed a place to stay on our travels we would stop again. It is also located on the historic route 66.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Wednesday, May 22 – Homolovi State Park, Winslow, AZ: This is an Arizona state park right off interstate 40 in the northeastern part of the state. The park which was supported by the Hopi people was established in 1896 and opened in 1993. It serves as a center of research for the late migration period of the Hopi from the 1200’s to the late 1300’s. There is not much for shade in the campground that has two loops and 53 sites. Most sites have water and electric and cost $25. There are showers that were clean, hot, and easy to use. There are hiking trails and interpretive exhibits at the Visitor Center. This was an overnight stop for us, and we enjoyed it, but in the afternoon Arizona was getting high winds east of Flagstaff of up to 46 miles per hour, and it was in the high 90’s. It was hard to walk on some of the trails because of the gusts of wind. One can drive to Homolovi I and Homolovi II ruins and then walk a very short trail to see the ruins of Pueblos that were ancestors of the present day Hopi people. The park is at an elevation of 4,900 feet and has 4,00 acres, it seems you can see for miles. The term “Homolovi” is Hopi for “Place of the Little Hills”. There are over 300 archaeological sites identified within the park. Good stopover or for a longer stay.
05/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Tuesday, May 21 – Dead Horse Ranch State Park, Cottonwood, AZ. Dead Horse Ranch State Park is located in Cottonwood, AZ. on 423 acres. The area has mild temperatures, so it is ideal for camping, biking, horseback riding, mountain biking and hiking along the Verde River, boating and fishing. This is a popular camping area for the “snowbirds” during the winter. The park has five loops for camping and three of them have electric and water. Bathhouses were clean and there were showers. The Quail loop has more vegetation and the higher you go there is less shade but the views of Cottonwood, Jerome and the Coconino National Forest from the top loops are stunning. The cost is $25 and reservations should be made for the winter season. There were only about twenty five campers the one night stopover we were there. There are a number of hiking trails throughout the park. Ranch history - The Ireys family came from Minnesota looking to buy a ranch in 1940’s. At this ranch they discovered a large dead horse lying by the road. After searching for a number of weeks the father asked his kids what ranch did they want to buy and they said “the one with the dead horse”. In 1973 the AZ State Parks system acquired the ranch with the condition that the name did not change. The park is a close drive to Jerome, Prescott Valley, Cottonwood and Sedona.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Wednesday, May 15 – North Rim Campground, Grand Canyon North Rim, AZ. This campground is about ten miles down the park road once you reach the fee station. The road down from Jacob Lake is about twenty five miles down through the Kalbab National Forest. We were there for opening day May 15, so everyone was just coming into the park. Nice campground with 78 sites plus 12 tent only sites set along the rim with aspen and ponderosa trees providing ample shade. Shower and laundry building for a fee at the entrance of the campground. A market with supplies and gifts nearby. Trails along the rim lead to the Visitor Center and Lodge. Beautiful spot to camp and our site overlooked the rim. Cost is now $25 per night without hookups and half that with a pass.
05/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
Monday, May 20 - Rancho Sedona RV Park, Sedona, AZ. This campground is expensive ($41 with tax), but you are paying for what they offer and where they are located. Walking distance of Tlaquepaque Market Place and short drive to Main Street Sedona, . Easy check in, full hookups, cable, free Wi-fi, laundry, dog walk area, volleyball area, horseshoes, tetherball, clean restrooms (could have more showers and toilets). We stayed for one night and really enjoyed the park. Beautiful huge trees providing shade and you can hear and walk to Oak Creek. This is a four season campground so it is always busy and reservations should be made especially during the snowbird and summer seasons. Everything that Sedona has to offer is just a short drive or walk away. Beautiful area!
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Sunday, May 19 – Cave Springs Campground, Coconino National Forest, Sedona, AZ This campground is on the west side of scenic 89A heading south to Sedona about ten miles away. Very popular campground especially on weekends. Some sites can be reserved but many first come first serve. Pit toilets and no hookups but water is available throughout the park. The park is nestled with the Red Rock Cliffs on the west and Ponderosa Trees at the base of Oak Creek Canyon. It costs $18 per site but with a pass half that. There are six loops with some sites right on Oak Creek and all of them are in walking distance of the creek and some swimming holes. Pay showers near a meadow and entrance station. The area is known for the rock formations with colors changing from gray to red to black. Very nice place to camp. Pit toilets were very clean.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Saturday, May 18 – Pine Flat West Campground, Coconino National Forest, Sedona, AZ This is the first National Forest campground driving south on scenic 89A from Flagstaff to Sedona. It is right after all the switchbacks. There are four loops, two on the east side of the road and two on the west side.. Only sites 21-38 can be reserved online. It costs $18 and half with a pass. No hookups but nice sites, few for large motorhomes. Bathhouses are pit toilets. It is located twelve miles north of Sedona at the base of Oak Creek Canyon. It is beautiful nestled among Ponderosa Trees with the Red Rock Cliffs surrounding it. The stream is stocked with trout and one can go birding, hiking and swimming. Nice place to camp for an overnight or longer. There were still sites available on Saturday when we arrived but most weekends they are full. The pit toilets were very clean!
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Friday, May 17 – Bonito Campground, Coconino National Forest, AZ This campground is twelve miles north of Flagstaff and just before the entrance gate and Visitor Center to Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument. No hookups but what a nice campground with backin and pull-through sites. The cost with a pass was $10. We arrived on a Friday and there were sites available since it is a first come first serve. The campground opened up May 3 and they get busy in the summer, holidays and weekends. Wapatki National Monument with the Pueblo Ruins is about 18 miles north on the loop road after Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument but it is a NPS fee area. Great place to camp and to visit two outstanding National Monuments!
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Monday & Tuesday, May 13 & 14 - Grand Canyon Trailer Village, Grand Canyon South Rim, AZ. This is the full hookup campground located in the village of the Grand Canyon – South Rim. There are some trees but not much shade,it is mostly like a parking lot. All sites are pull-through, paved with a picnic table, barbecue grill, 30 or 50 amp, cable, water and sewage. It costs$37 per night and park passes are not accepted. The Mather NPS campground is right next door with more shade but no hookups and the two campgrounds share shower and camper services. It is a must to reserve a site for both and calling the campground to see if any sites are open would be advisable. You are paying for location in the Grand Canyon. There is a shuttle stop here that takes you around the Village but you will have to get off to get to where you are going since there are three loops for the shuttle. A market place, grocery store, deli, and food court are available within walking distance or the first stop on the shuttle. Great place to stay but be warned the shuttles start to get mobbed around 10 in the morning heading west into the village and then in the afternoon around 3 heading east. In the morning three Elk were in our campsite and I was able to go outside and take some great pictures. They are use to people and they love this campground. They are overpopulating the park and some campers are feeding them. One ranger told us that sometimes at night they even try to look through the window of the RV’s and watch TV. Their racks were huge and there are not any flowers left in this area because they are eating them all.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Saturday/Sunday – May 11 & 12 Goulding’s Monument Valley Camp Park, Utah This is expensive ($46 ) but if you want to camp in Monument Valley this is the place to be. There are tent sites, back -ins and pull-throughs. 66 sites in all with full hookups, cable and internet plus tent sites. At the campground there is a store, pool, showers and down the road the lodge, movie theater where John Wayne movies are shown, shuttles to the lodge and tours, hikes, museum, food court, gas station, restaurant, grocery store and a gift shop. The road into Goulding’s is right across from the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park. This campground sits on a hill in a canyon with the opening looking out towards Monument Valley so the pictures at sunset and sunrise are stunning!
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Friday, May 3 – Fruita Campground, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah This campground is open year round located a mile from the Capitol Reef Visitor Center right on the Scenic Drive. There are three loops A/B/C/ with 71 RV/tent sites. No hookups but a picnic table and grill. Located next to the Fremont River and under beautiful cottonwood trees for shade. Cost is $10 and $5 with a senior pass. The Fruita Historic District is right next to the campground so one can walk to the old barn, a one room school house, blacksmith shop, orchards and the historic Gifford House which is also a bakery. The bakery sells homemade fruit pies everyday and other goodies. Yum! Lots of hikes within walking distance and along the Scenic Drive. The Scenic Drive is a must and if you have an RV less than 26ft you can also drive the gravel roads in the canyons. We got there around 10 am and there was only two sites left in our site Loop A. The days we were there all loops were filled before noon. They don’t take reservations so it’s a first come, first serve campground. A herd and I mean herd over 30 mule deer feed in the morning and early evening in the campground and the meadow next to Loop A. Deer can also be found feeding in the orchards near Loop C. Great place to camp!
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Friday – May 10 – Blue Mountain RV Park, Blanding, Utah. This park is located just south of Blanding, Utah on route 191. There are full hookups, free WiFi, laundry and a store. It is a convenient place to stop with so much to see and do in the area. The four corners, Canyonlands, Monument Valley and the Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum. The campground looks out at the Abajo Mountains. Check in was fast, easy and convenient. Campground was very quiet and seems to be a place that large motorhomes like to stay especially for the pull-throughs. We enjoyed our stay.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Wednesday/Thursday – May 8,9 – Kayenta Campground, Dead Horse Point State Park, Utah This campground is off the road that heads to Canyonlands National Park, Island of the Sky district. It is in a beautiful area of Utah and there is a Visitor Center, hikes such as the East Rim and West Rim and then the Dead Horse Point Lookout that overlooks the Colorado River which is stunning. The history behind the point where cowboys used to drive Wild Mustangs to a hidden coral and then leave the ones they didn’t want to die without water within the fence is troubling. The campground has 21 sites all with electricity but no water, no showers and no fill ups for RV’s. There are no water spigots anywhere in the park. Our site 1 had a nice view and we were able to get level but most sites are not level. Reservations are a must for this time of year. The bathhouse was clean and did have flush toilets. Interesting and beautiful place to camp. The costs was $20 a night !and one can walk to the Visitor Center
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Monday, May 6 – Devils Garden Campground, Arches National Park, Utah This is the only developed campground in Arches with 54 sites and no hookups or showers. Make reservations because they have been full every night. We stayed two nights and enjoyed the ranger programs and the hikes from the campground. The campground is at the way end of the park road through the park. The Devils Garden trailhead starts there and it is about 8 miles in with other trails shooting off. The campground has three trails that lead off one near site 38 and also views that can be hiked to from some of the camp sites. Beautiful park with lots to do and with a senior pass it costs $10 a night. Bathhouses were clean but no showers and RV’s cannot fill up their water tanks. So much to see and do in the park. The morning we left after a thunderstorm and rainstorm some of the drives were temporary closed for fear of flashfloods but I am sure by the afternoon they must have been open again. The drive up to the viewpoints from the Visitor Center is quite steep with curves but the rest of the park is easy to drive. They do have some sites that can fit large RV’s but not many, so if making a reservation one needs to notice the site size.
05/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Sunday, May 5 – Goblin Valley State Park, Utah This campground is off of route 24 about 20 miles north of Hanksville, Utah then follow the signs in. Very well marked! The GPS may take you on an unpaved road but don’t go that way follow the directions using the signs. All roads in are paved. It sits in the San Rafael Reef and the landscape is different with sandstone goblins that look like they are from outerspace. The movie Galaxy Quest was filmed here. There are 24 sites without hookups but the bathhouse does have showers. The campground is surrounded by rocks to protect the sites from the wind but the sand can still blow. One can hike or drive to the observation point to view the formations and even walk the steps down to get a closer view. All sites are paved with a screen picnic table. There are exhibits at the Visitor Center, an OHV stage area and an amphitheater. It was a stopover for us and a great place to camp. $16 a night and all sites were taken so one might want to reserve a site.
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Monday, April 29 – Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park, Utah This park is in the southwest section of Utah to the east of Zion and near Kanab. If you come out of route 9 heading east from Zion, you head south on 89 for about 4 miles than pick up route 43 for another 12 miles south. There are plenty of signs posted along the roads and the drive into the park is very nice. The park has juniper and pinion pines and steep red cliffs. Once you drive in and stop at the visitor center the ranger or hostess that checked us in was very nice and informative. The campground is just down the road and there are twenty two sites in one loop. No hookups, but water can be found at the dump station and bath house. The bath house is one of the best that we have seen in two months of traveling-very clean and updated. They do take reservations. If you don’t reserve you may have to check in every day to see if your site is still available. Our site was a nice pull through, level and shaded. What this park is known for is 1200 acres of pink sand dunes – beautiful. We even took the OHV tour offered in the parking lot through the sand dunes $$ with one other couple and a nice guide. It was a great time. I am glad we were there on a Monday, because on most weekends this park fills up with campers and day visitors, most with their own OHV’s and we heard the noise can be loud. Quiet hours start at 10 at night until 9 in the morning. When we left Zion, it was in the mid 90’s and I thought it would be unbearable here without hookups, but it wasn’t. It was cooler than Zion with a nice breeze blowing through all day. This was a one night stopover for us and we were so glad that we decided to camp here.
05/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Wednesday, May 1 – Kodachrome Basin State Park, Utah This park is located about 25 miles north of Bryce Canyon National Park off of route 12. Nice drive getting to it. The park has over 4,000 acres with striking rock formations. In 1948 the National Geographic Magazine sent a group here for pictures and a story and they named the area Kodachrome after the film because of the beauty and color found here. It did change names a few times but then stuck with the Kodachrome Basin name. The campground sits in a basin with 30 numbered sites that can be reserved online. If you do not have reservations you get a one night permit and then might have to change sites daily. The cost is $20 for a site with hookups (8 of them). The bath house was clean with showers. There is a visitor center and a number of hikes within walking distance of the park. When you are driving to the park, you will go by one of the visitor centers for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument which surrounds this park. That is a good stop and very informative. We have heard great things about Kodachrome Basin State Park and we were not disappointed.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Tuesday, April 30 – North Campground, Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah This is one of two developed campgrounds located in Bryce Canyon, both with no hookups and showers only at the General Store ($) within walking distance. North Campground is closer to the Rim Trail and Visitor Center and is open year round. Sites are first come first serve except in the summer there are 15 RV sites that can be reserved in Loop A online. Loops A and B are for campers over 20ft and Loops C and D for those campers or tents less than 20ft. Except our Loop B, over half of the sites the night we were there were taken by tenters in pull -through sites. Even though there is a big sign posted at the beginning of the Loop saying it was for campers over 20ft. The B Loop has more level sites and the most shade. This was an overnight stop for us and it cost $7.50, because of the American the Beautiful Pass for seniors. There is a self fee station when you drive in. We arrived around 10am and so did most of other RV’s coming in. So if coming to the park, arrive early to get a site. They run a shuttle up the park road in early May until late August, so we just missed it. I am sure it would have made our visit even more enjoyable. Beautiful National Park and a great place to camp.
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Friday, Saturday, Sunday – April 26,27 & 28 Watchman Campground, Zion National Park, Utah This is one of two campgrounds at the southwest entrance to Zion National Park and the only one with electric (no water only at the dump station). Watchman Campground is now reservations only. All campgrounds were full when we arrived at 11am so we were glad that we had reserved an electric site in the B Loop right next to the river. Our site did not have shade but it still was quite comfortable even with the temperature hitting 90 degrees and the river for swimming was about 5 yards away. The A and B loops bath houses were upgraded just a few years ago so they were nice and clean. There are over 61 sites in this campground laid out in A-E loops and another walk in tent loop. Some sites are private and others are right next to each other but just being in the park within walking distance to the river, visitor center, shuttles, amphitheater and the shuttle for Springdale was great. The last time we were here we had to drive our RV down in the valley and it was bumper to bumper and hard to find a place to park our camper. Now there are shuttles that start at 5:30 in the morning until after 8 or 9 at night. They come every 8 minutes and it made our stay here so much better than last time. You can get on and off at all the stops for hikes, walks and ranger talks. I have always loved Zion National Park and it still is my favorite canyon to visit with the rocks, mountains and the beautiful Virgin River flowing through it. Entrance Fee is $25 for seven days,but with a pass it was free and the cost per night camping was $10 with the pass. We only stayed three days but should have stopped here for at least a week.
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This state park is located about fifty miles north from Las Vegas, so it is a very popular spot for day trips and campers. There are two campgrounds in the park right near each other - Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock. Atlatl has some electric sites, water and hot showers and fills up first and early; then later on mid-day Arch Rock campground fills up. We got there around 10 in the morning and found a spot in Atlatl. So many RV’s drove around looking for spots late in the afternoon and this was only a Thursday. Many rental RV’s with tourists from overseas. There were some electric sites open, but we chose to dry camp because the temperature was only around 75 degrees and our site was more private. The sandstone red rock formations are stunning. The host was very helpful and it is a self check-in station. We had to pay $10 to get into the park. When you self register for the campsite: if you put your gate receipt in the envelope it was another $10 for dry camping and $20 for electric. If you don’t include the receipt dry camping is $20 and electric $30. One can hike in the campground and the park itself has a visitor center. There is a variety of places to hike and pullouts for scenic views. Everyone has always raved about this state park and I can see why. It is beautiful! I wish that NV would release the handicapped sites at the end of the day so all those wanting to camp here could use them. Also, they should put out a campground full sign so that campers are not going through the campground late in the evening thinking there are sites available. The sign should be at the entrance gates so you do not have to drive in to find out. Another interesting point, it seems they only collect the fee into the park at the west gate, so if you come in and leave by the east gate you don’t have to pay. If you can’t find a camping spot there is also a great BLM spot right on a cliff just north of the east gate heading to Overton Beach. There were about 30 RV’s there when we drove by in the morning.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park is across the street from the Casino and it is a good idea to have reservations. You call the main number and make your reservations through the hotel. It is hard to find information about the park online through their website, so read the park reviews. to help you. Sites are right next to each other in a parking lot that is secure with security making their rounds in cars and bikes. It costs us $16 for a full hookup site (even though our sewer did not work). There is a bathhouse and you will get keys for them at registration. They advise to call two hours before arrival to get a site number first. Once you are all set up you cross the street to the Main Casino/Hotel and register. Pull through sites are more expensive. At the drive in, there is a dip that can scrape the back of your RV so take it slow. This was a one night stop for us and we enjoyed being in old Vegas. You can walk to the historic district and experience the light show and market place during the day and at night. There are restaurants, shows and old casinos to enjoy like the original Golden Nugget. Enjoyed our stay. There are shuttles if you want to head to the strip.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Sam’s Town Hotel/Casino/and RV Park This park is big and they have another one somewhere on the property called Nellis RV Park. The park cost us $24.50 with a Good Sam discount for full hookups (30 amp – higher amps higher fee), back in site, cable, laundry, pool, hot tub, pay extra for internet, dog park and free shuttle to strip, We really enjoyed this campground, even though the sites are right next to each other. Loved the casino, places to eat, movies etc., shows and appreciate the free shuttle to the strip. It was nice to return to a casino and park without all the hustle and bustle of the strip. There is a super Wal-Mart right across the street and it is easier to get to the park than if you were parking along the strip.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Monday, April 22 – Riverside Resort Hotel and Casino RV Park, Laughlin, NV. We made many wrong turns to find the entrance to this park, and then we were lost inside the park trying to find our site. Check in was fast and efficient, and our site was down the hill within walking distance of the entrance of the casino. Full hookups, cable, laundry, bus stops, and bath houses. You need a card to get into the bath houses, and we didn’t realize this until the office had closed so we could not get in. This was a one night stopover, and it was interesting. We took the water taxi ($4.00) down to the last casino and then walked back along the river walk. Easy walk and because it was so hot today walking into the casinos along the walk was a nice break. Riverside has a nice buffet with great views of the river. They also have some car museums, bowling alley, movie theater and arcade. The night cost us $27.50. At this park they advertise over 700 sites but the park map only shows 532, so I don’t know if they have another section. Good stop, but it was a Monday so it was not crowded at all.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This state park is just north of the London Bridge off 95 in Lake Havasu City and it is located right along the Colorado River. It is a very popular snowbird and spring break location. The sites don’t have electric but water can be found. It was in the mid 90’s when we stopped over and with no electric it was very hot even with the breeze from the river. There are 46 sites located along three roads. Some have a cabana over the picnic table and others do not. You can walk to the beach area and the river from the sites. In the park there are docks and ramps for boaters, trails, a nature trail, and a day use area with a beach. Boaters are on the river – private boats, water ski’s, jet skis and tour boats. Many are loud! It is a beautiful area and Lake Havasu City is only .5 away for shopping, restaurants, London Bridge etc. There was a notice that electric is coming but could not find the date or year when.
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Thursday, April 19 – Palm Springs Oasis RV Resort, Cathedral City, CA This 55 and older park is right on the city line with Palm Springs and on Date Palm Drive. We stayed here while visiting a friend that lives in Cathedral City which has a rule that RV’s can not be parked in a driveway or on the street. Since we had Passport America (after March 31) we were lucky that it only cost us $32 a night. Check in was quick and informative and we did enjoy our stay. Other campers were very friendly. The campground sites are right next to each other and most in the sun. There is free , cable, full hookups, two pools (one for adults), hot tub, shuffleboard courts, horseshoe pits, clubhouse you can find golf courses, putting greens and tennis courts. There were two bath houses and they were very clean. One can see in the distance canyons surrounding this park. Good stay!
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Wednesday, April 17 – Joshua Tree National Park – Black Rock Campground. This campground is located in the northwest of part Joshua Tree National Park. You have to leave the Park and then drive in from Yucca Valley. It is the closest campground from the Palm Springs area, and the Visitor Center was very busy. Some of the reviews for the campground have not been good but we loved it. It is set up in the mountains with views of the valley below. Joshua Trees are in all the sites. A number of bath houses and not pits. No hookups but water was available around the campground. Check in was fast, but it takes place at the Nature Center, and after hours you have a self check in. Not all sites are level, but you can find level sites even for big rigs. There are 99 sites for $15 per night and half of that if you have a pass. The campground is big with sites in eight different roads. The sites at the top have excellent views. There is even a horse camp at this campground. The one negative is the drive in. Once you get off Joshua Lane, the two little roads in are filled with potholes that really need to be fixed. This campground is one of two at the National Park that does take reservations.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Tuesday, April 16 – Indian Cove Campground. This campground is located in Joshua Tree National Park, CA. It is one of eight campgrounds in the park plus you can wilderness camp but need to check at the Visitor Centers. Indian Cove is in the northern section of the park, and one must drive out towards Twenty-Nine Palms and then off of route 62 take the Indians Cove road to drive back into the park about 3 or more miles. The reason we selected this campground is that it is one of two that accepts reservations in the park. There were 101 one sites located among the rocks with fancy pit toilets located all over. No water or electricity in the park. Sites can be tight, but there are sites that can hold RV’s, but nothing I saw that would take a 35 foot or larger RV. We have a 25ft RV, and our site 53 was a tight squeeze. The park is beautiful with rocks all over. All sites were in the rocks and there are hiking trails and rock climbing areas throughout this campground and the park. This campground is near Twenty Nine Palms for services. We drove up from the south entering near Cottonwood campground and there is a single lane stretch of over 13 miles that you have a lead car that takes you. Heading north the lead car takes off every hour and half hour, and coming down from the north it goes every quarter past and forty five minutes past the hour. Speed limit is 25 but our lead car took off at 40 going over tar, rocks, loose gravel and by construction crews. Watch out for stones hitting your windshield from the car in front. On our way we passed two other campgrounds, White Tank and Belle (smaller than Indian Cove), and we could have fit in there. We also drove into Jumbo Rocks Campground, and that one was stunning and there were some sites in there we could have fit in. They have a limit there of 30 feet. Those campgrounds are first come first serve and Jumbo Rocks on a Tuesday was almost full. Over the weekend all campgrounds were full and campers had to park in an overflow area near Twenty Nine Palms. There are three main visitor centers at the entrances, and all of them have different exhibits. The Twenty Nine Palms Visitor Center also has the Mara Oasis located there. Black Rock, Cottonwood, and Indian Cove cost $15 per night and the others $10. If you have a pass, your entrance to the park is free and the camping is 50% off. Nice spot to camp, and in April the nights are still cold.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
The Salton Sea SRA has a few campgrounds but this one has full hookups and takes reservations. The Visitor Center was closed to save money but you can walk around outside and read some of the signs and exhibits. The sea was there and a number of people were fishing. The sites have a tree, grill and picnic table but you hookup on the left but your picnic table is next to the site on the right. All the sites in this campground are in a line facing the parking lot and sea. Late afternoon, there were only two RV’s but at the check in booth two others had reservations and were expected to come in. No ranger on duty. It was a self check in. Can’t complain but considering what they charge for an out of state reservation, I would have thought someone should be there. We paid a $30 fee and an $8 transaction fee but then were given a $2 senior discount. The total price was $36. We really enjoyed driving through the canyon road through the Orocopia Mtns (beautiful) and then through the miles and miles of fields growing grapefruit, oranges, grapes, corn, palm trees, peppers and other things driving into Mecca and then down route 111 to the Salton Sea.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Sunday, April 14 – Mayflower Country Park, Blythe, CA: This is right over the state line from AZ interstate 10 heading west. It cost us $12 with Passport America, but they don’t honor it during the winter months when this park is full. We had a half shade site with water and electric. This park sits on the Colorado River, but it is too dangerous to swim in it and warnings are posted. Check in was efficient and the guy was really nice and informative. There are no reservations; it’s a first come first serve park. Picnic areas are in the park and the bath house serves both those camping and those using the park for the day. The bath house needs to be updated. It is old, used, but it was clean. There is RV storage in the park, lawn bowling, and three loops for camping. We were allowed to pick our own site. On a Sunday night in April less than a third of the sites were taken. Fine for an overnight!
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Wednesday, April 10 – Lost Dutchman State Park, Apache Junction, AZ: This park is off the Apache Trail in the Tonto National Forest. There are 68 sites in three loops that interlock. Some have water and electricity but no full hookups. Bath houses were clean and convenient. It is a beautiful campground and some sites can hold the big rigs. All sites with electricity were taken so you might want to make reservations. The mountains surround this area, and there are 320 acres of hiking trails, camping, and picnicking areas. The rangers even offer moonlight hikes and guided hikes, but the schedule should be checked. The cost is $25, but if you make a reservation the fee is $30. We had a beautiful site 43 looking out over the mountains. This park is close to Goldfield Ghost Town and Mine Tours, Superstition Mountain Museum and Superstition Mountains. The Apache Trail climbs past the mountains through Fish Creek Canyon and edges of Apache, Saguaro, Canyon and Roosevelt lakes.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is right off interstate 10 between Tucson and Phoenix. You can see the 1,500 foot Picacho Peak from miles away. There are trails to hike that wind up the peak and in the spring you can overlook fields of wildflowers. Settlers heading west used the peak as a landmark traveling between New Mexico and California and later the road for the forty-niners and the Butterfield Overland Stage. This park is known for its landscape, and historical importance. It is the site of AZ's westernmost Civil War Battle. Union soldiers defeated 10 Confederate cavalrymen at this spot. The park was empty when we stayed overnight only about four or five campers per loop and there are three loops. We were in the B loop and had great views. Only one bath house was open but it was clean with hot showers. This is a very popular park for the snowbirds that come down in the winter and leave April 1. It is in a windy area and we were warned driving up interstate 10 to be careful about the desert winds. There is a visitor center with some exhibits and a gift shop. The area is known for its wildlife viewing and bird watching. We had electric but no water and the cost was $25 plus a $5 reservation fee. Very interesting overnight stop!
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is north of Tucson set in the Santa Catalina Mts. Our site B 11 had the mountains to our back and it was stunning. The campground has two sections A and B, both have electric and water but A also has some primitive sites. It is home to 5,525 acres of desert plants. There is an Equestrian Center and bridle trails in the park and a number of hiking trails. There is a bird watching trail and an interpretive trail that winds around the Romero Ruins, the site of a Hohokam village occupied 500-1450. It costs $25 and if you reserve a site a $5 fee is added on. The bath house is one of the nicest we have seen in two months of traveling – new and clean. Very nice! There is a Wal-Mart right across the street from the park!
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is to the west of Tucson, you drive Kinney Road and then take McCain Loop Road (RV’s are not to drive the Gates Pass Road over the Mountains to Tucson). Just north of the campground is Saguaro National Park West. The campground is a County Park and it is set in the desert with the mountains in the distance and Saguaro’s throughout the landscape. There was a host at the check in booth that assigned us a site, but she would be leaving in a week then it will be self register only until next winter. The sites are laid out in three loops all with electric but no water. The views are beautiful from all the sites. Make sure you fill up with water before you come but there is a spot for filling up and also a dump station. Water spigots are all over this park about every three sites if you need water. There were bath houses (no showers) and recycling bins. There are a lot of places to hike and bike!
04/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
There are many parks around Benson because of the snowbirds, but this is one of the nicest. They take Good Sam and Passport America (some months), so it cost us $37.15, which is one of the most expensive parks we have stayed at in the last two months. It is nicely laid out with all sites paved, full hookups, cable and Wi-Fi. You can see the mountains in the distance and every site seems to have one tree on it. There is an observatory at the park and every night there is a show which is free but one needs to sign up to make sure there is room. On site they have a pool, spa, library/computer lab, wood shop, laundry room, fitness room, card room with pool table, large clubhouse and banquet hall. One can walk to restaurants, post office, hospital and the center of town. Benson is centrally located in the center of Cochise County and an easy drive to many of the must-see sights in the area. It is only about 21 miles to Tombstone! You do hear trains come by but I have found that in the West – trains are so valuable in moving goods that almost every town has trains passing by. It is a good place to stay and we would return to this park!
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is right in the middle of the historic district of Tombstone between Fremont Street and Allen. You can walk to everything in town except for Boot Hill, which is a stop one can make driving in on 80 from the north. Sites are crowded but they have Wi-Fi, cable, full hookups, laundry, and a bath house. The manager was very friendly and informative at check in, and the places he recommended were all great. Your receipt can be used for a discount at some of the restaurants and museums in town just ask at check in. Tombstone is surrounded by mountains and is a fun town to visit even for just a one night stopover.
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground opened up in 1999 when the Caverns opened. It is very well laid out in two loops and two modern bath houses. Mountains surround the campground and there are many hiking trails up the mountains and to the Discovery Center (Visitor Center). It is an easy walk over to Discovery Center where the tours take off from. The Cavern Tours were all sold out the day we got there so it is a good idea to make reservations before you come. There were many sites available in the campground but this is April and many snowbirds are heading home. All sites have water and electricity and there are 61 sites. The Host introduced himself and asked if he could help. At the Bat Café at the Center they serve Green Chilie Pizza and Prickly Pear Lemonade which was excellent. If you are in AZ this is a must stop! In the summer some tours are not offered because of the pregnant bats. The cost per night is $25 but then with a $5 reservation fee is comes to $30. Some of the sites are not level and that is why I gave it a 9.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This was a passport America campground for us so it cost a little over $19 for a night. It is on the outskirts of Willcox with gravel and stone sites. Not much for shade but it was a good stop for us since we had to do laundry. The campground has cable, dump station, fitness center, full hookups, horseshoes, pull-throughs, showers, and Wi-Fi. It is two miles away from the historic district of Willcox with the Chiricahua Museum, Rex Allen Museum and Friends of Marty Robbins Museum. One can drive to the Chiricahua National Monument, Cochise Stronghold and Fort Bowie Historic Site. We used it for an overnight but some of the other campers stayed for a couple of days to travel to visit these other sites.
03/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
We stayed here for two nights because it was Easter weekend and many of the other parks in the area don’t take reservations. The rate is $44, but they do offer Passport America (1 night only) and Good Sam discounts. Right on the main drag with gas stations and restaurants and it is about 22 miles to the Caverns from here. Check-in was fast, informative and very friendly. Now the campground it has many things – laundry, cable, clubhouse with game tables, full hookups, horseshoes, pet area, playground, indoor pool, showers, store and Wi-Fi. The sites are on gravel and right next to each other. The bathhouse (needs updating) and laundry are right next to the office so it is a walk from some of the sites. This was the most expensive campground we have stayed at in the last two months so I think the rates are high.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is another NM state park located about 20 miles south of Silver City. There are 45 no hookup campsites located among the rocks that were formed by a large volcanic eruption millions of years ago. These sites are unique and on the Sunday that we were there many were rented out just for the day for picnics. There are also 10 sites with water and electricity located at the southern part of the campground and only three of these can be reserved. The site we had was a very nice pull through with a covered table facing the rocks. It cost us $24 and $10 of that was a reservation fee. They had some trouble with those camping on one site but the rangers and volunteers seem to handle it very well. Rules of camping were not followed – loud past quiet hours, 6 cars at site and more than 8 people. Parking in other sites. It was Easter Sunday so extended families came out to enjoy the day. At the campground there is a Botanical Garden, Educational Tours and walks, hiking trail that lead to Petroglyphs, Star Observatory and Wildlife viewing. There is also a Visitor Center with exhibits and movie about the park. We found the volunteers and staff working the center and the campground very helpful and informative. New Mexico needs to put the money back into the state park by hiring more rangers. National and State Parks are the jewels of our county.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a state park located 12 miles south of Alamogordo in the southern part of the state. It is located off of route 54 south about 12 miles south of Alamogordo and then another 4 miles on Dog Canyon Road. We were almost thinking of turning around because all we could see in front of us was a mountain and nothing else and then at the end of the road there was the campground. It is situated in a green oasis around the springs of Dog Canyon that is a deep ravine on the west facing flank of the Sacramento Mountains. There is a Visitor Center with exhibits and a mile away there are tours at 3 on weekends for the restored house of rancher Oliver Milton Lee. It seems Oliver was a Democrat and got into trouble with some Republicans. Pat Garrett tried to arrest him and there was a gun battle but he got away. Eventually he turned himself in. The campground has two loops and some of the sites you might have trouble getting level but we had site 1 and were able to get our 25ft RV level with the most beautiful views of the mountains behind us and the valley below. Some sites can be reserved and less than half of them have water and electric. There are some hiking trails - one about five miles up the canyon and then a pretty half mile hike down along the springs but beware of flash floods. The campground has a dump station, hot showers, interpretive programs, picnic, and wildlife viewing and modern restrooms It was not full on Saturday night but all the electric sites had been taken so you might want to reserve a site before you come. It was $14 for the site and on Reserve America another $10 for a transaction fee.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is north of Alpine, but close to everything has about 93 sites with full hookups and some tent sites. The campground has a pool, playground, laundry, recreation room, gift shop, and bath house. Check in was quick, informative and they drive you to your site. Free Wi-fi/cable and the internet was very good. A number of restaurants are near by and it is close to Fort Davis and the Museum of Big Bend at the local University. Nice stay. Cost with Good Sam was $30 for a night.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park sits in a valley with the Davis Mountains surrounding it. Fort Davis is about three miles down the road with restaurants, gas and the Fort Davis National Historic Site. It cost us $25 for full hookups and cable for the first night and because we had a TX State Park Pass we did not have to pay the entrance fee and our second night cost $12.50 (you get about 4, 50% off coupons for camping when you buy the pass). The campground looks up towards the mountains and it is an easy ride of about 11 miles up route 118 to the University of Texas McDonald’s Observatory. There are 94 sites for tents, w & e, and full hookups. Bath houses were OK. Sites for full hookups 17 to 28 did not seem to be level but the area we were in 1-16 were very level and great sites. There is the Indian Lodge just up the hill with a restaurant but there seems to be concern that they recently changed the menu with higher prices and took out a number of favorite items. It is a great place to camp and when it is hot in Texas this area seems to be comfortable. There is an amphitheater, wildlife viewing, scenic overlook drive, playground, bike trail, hiking trails, primitive equestrian camping, interpretive center and dump station. We would come back!
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a motel and RV park in Marathon one of the gateways for Big Bend National Park. It is good for an overnight or longer stay. We paid $12.50 with Passport America. There are 19 sites with full hookups and some tent sites. Cable and Wi-Fi are also offered. The sites are on ground hard pack dirt and it is close to town with some cute restaurants and two gas stations. On the grounds there is a bath house with one shower but it is clean. The motel is done in the Adobe style and there is an outdoor little park with an outside fireplace, wooden seats and cacti surrounding it. It is cute! If you want to sit by the fire at night they will light it for you. Very friendly and informative check in. This was a one night stop.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
There are over 100 sites some with shade and others like ours # 6 without. It was so hot the first day (high 90’s) that we were thinking of moving but it was a Saturday night and there were not too many options since the campground was almost full. Around 2 am winds came over 57 miles per hour and finally stopped in early morning and the temperature drop down to 73 so we didn’t move. The bath house was clean and the hosts work so hard meeting everyone that comes in and helping them get settled. You can see the Boquillas Canyon in the distance and walking the nature trail the Rio Grande and Mexico. There is a store and visitor center just down the road where there is also a campground with hookups but that is a private park. Big Bend National Park has so much to do and a huge area to cover. There are other campgrounds in the park so if you are planning to come here make sure you visit the NPS website to get all the information that you need. We used our America the Beautiful Pass so it costs us $7.00 per night.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is huge with 109 full hookup sites some sites are shaded riverfront sites with fire pits. They have laundry, satellite RV available, pets welcome, free fishing, canoeing and paddleboat, free internet, and cable. There are some ponds surrounding the campground and nearby is a clubhouse with tables for pingpong, shuffleboard, pool and a lot more. It is rare in this part of TX to see trees, shade and water. There is a casino, shopping and golf near by. If you are headed west or east this is a good stopover.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
If you are headed east or west on 90 in TX, this is a must stop for at least one night or more. The campground has 23 sites with electric and water and 8 with only water. There is also a primitive area with another 15 sites. Bath houses are clean and the shower water is hot. Each site sits among the cacti and brush with a covered picnic table and views looking out towards the canyon and even Mexico. Everyone was very friendly and there is an exhibit area at the Visitor Center and scheduled tours by the rangers at 10 and 3 Wednesday through Sunday, but one should check first. There is even a star walk some nights from the campground with a ranger. The tour into the canyon cost $5. It cost us $17 for the campsite, but that was with a Texas State Park Pass. The tour down into the canyon to view the historic pictographs was great, but we had only three other people on our tour. If we had come during spring break last week or the week before the number of people on the tour were in the high 60’s and even higher. The busy season is October through March.
03/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
Monday, March 18. Mustang Island State Park, Mustang Island, TX. This part costs us $20 with a Texas State Park Pass and if we stay another night it would have been cheaper. There are 48 sites on a parking lot with another three or four hosts sites. All sites have water and electricity and a little cover for the picnic table. There are also a number of primitive sites right on the beach mostly for those tenting. The park has hot showers, picnic shelters on the beach, swimming and fishing. The sites aren’t bad and within walking distance to the beach. This is one of the few undeveloped barrier island habitats on the entire Texas Gulf coast. Wild mustangs used to roam here. The Gulf of Mexico is on one side of this thin strand of land and the Corpus Christi Bay on the other. Everything washes ashore here as this island protects the mainland from hurricanes. This is a big birding area and in the spring and fall birds can be seen migrating north or south. It is about ten miles north of Padro Island National Seashore.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a first come first serve campground with no hookup 50 yards away from the ocean. There is a bathhouse with showers. It is in walking distance to the Visitor Center where one will find exhibits, films, and meet for ranger tours. We took a driving birding tour for over two hours and it was excellent. The campground has an amphitheater with fire pit where Rangers give talks on a scheduled basis. There is a daily sheet with all the tours, walks and talks given by the Rangers. At this campground there are 43 RV sites, 7 for compact vehicles and 26 sites for tent camping many right on the beach. There is another campground right on the bay but it is smaller but the bay is better for wind surfing and kayaking. If you have an America the Beautiful pass you don’t pay a fee to get into the park and you get 50% off camping fees so we paid $4.00. If you want to camp on the beach south of the Visitor Center it is free but don’t get stuck it will cost $1000 to get pulled out. Padre Island is a great birding site for those migrating in the spring and fall.
03/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
Friday, Saturday and Sunday March 15,16,17: This is a Travelers World Carefree RV Resort on Roosevelt Avenue in San Antonio, TX. The park cost $40 per day, but with Good Sam, it was $34. It’s a nice park with full hookups, Wifi, cable, pool, hot tub, clubhouse, laundry, dog park, rental cottages, playground, and camp store. The bus stops right across the street and if you go to the transportation information center downtown, and you are over 62, they take your picture and you have a bus discount pass that will cost 60 cents a ride and free on weekends. The pass is good for five years. Very easy to ride the bus, and it stops within walking distance of the Alamo. The Alamo and River Walk are a must see. The park is close to mission road and the missions. The excellent river road bike trail is just outside the gate of the campground. What a beautiful bike trail and very well marked! Check in was fast, easy and informative. Nice quiet park.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park cost us $18 with Passport America. They have RV sites and really nice tent sites, many sitting on the Guadalupe River. We had a backin site on the river, with full hookups, cable, Wi-Fi, laundry, clubhouse, fishing, bird watching, inner tube floating, swimming in the river at your own risk, picnic areas, nature walks and a pool. Checkin was fast, friendly, easy and very informative. You follow a golf cart to your site. The RV sites are right next to each other. It seems there are a number of snowbirds here, and most will be leaving by April 1. We did enjoy the campground, especially walking along the Guadalupe River.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is right off hwy 281 and 290 in Johnson City, TX. We stayed here for a night so we could visit the Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park in Johnson City. The park has 44 pull through sites with full hookups, 10 new spacious sites with 50 amps for big rigs, and 18 back in sites. The bathrooms were clean. The laundry only had one machine but it was new, fast, and only a $1.00. When we checked in the owner had baked some chocolate chip cookies and they were so good right out of the oven. There is no cable here but they do have free Wi-Fi, a market, restaurants, and ACE hardware all within walking distance. There is a winery within a mile. It was a good stop!
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a county park three miles south of the village with 90 sites. Sites are close together with full hookups and cable. Wi-Fi is extra. It cost $30 and must be paid with cash or check. The park has a golf course, ball fields, a river that runs through it for fishing, picnic areas, dancing patio, and driving range. Park was very quiet and the staff was very friendly at check in. We went by a number of RV campgrounds driving west on 290 and I think this is the best one in the area.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is right in the middle of the city of Austin on Barton Springs Road which is called restaurant row. The park has a lot of permanents and only about three overnight sites so if you plan to camp here you need to call for reservations about three months ahead. You can’t reserve online. The price includes full hookups, cable, and Wi-Fi. The owners really had great suggestions of what to do etc. Sites are right next to each other. Check in was quick and so informative. There are many cute restaurants within walking distance. The city bus stops across the street and for a $1 they will drop you off and pick you up in front of the Visitor Center on 11th. The capitol, music district, museums, University of Texas all within walking distance. One can bike from the campground to one of the bike trails by using the sidewalks and it is an easy ride.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park gives discounts for Good Sam and Passport America so we only paid $16 for the night. It is hard to find it on a GPS but if you follow their directions and take Woodville Road exit off of Hwy 6 and follow their blue signs you will be fine. There are two parks here - an RV and a Motor Home. Most seem to be here full time. The sites are close together, have 30 & 50 amps, pets are welcome, cable TV, wireless internet, and a swimming pool. The woman checking us in was very nice and informative. The RV park has 140 sites. It is very close to Texas A & M University and the Presidential Library of George H. Bush (a must stop).
03/2013
rating [ 1/10 ]
We had to drive up one side of the Intracostal Waterway to get over a bridge to come back down the other side to head to Sea Rim State Park. This park was destroyed by Hurricane Ike (2008) and they are just starting to put money back into it now. It is really pretty sitting on the Gulf of Mexico but so much of the park is underwater and under construction. Texas charges you an entrance fee and $10 to stay in a primitive site. I really don’t think they should charge a fee to get in at all, but it does sit on the Gulf, and it is very peaceful. There are 4141 acres of marshland here with 5.2 miles of beach. The state purchased this from an oil company in 1972. Sea Rim refers to the portion of the Gulf shoreline where marsh grasses meet the surf. It is on the bird migration trail, so a lot of birders come here. There were two other campers here: one from Washington State, and the couple stayed here three years ago and told us it was worse then, but they have been working on it. The wife loves to walk the beach and collect shells and did she get some good ones. The map of the park showed that before it was destroyed there were two camping areas without electric, two beaches, picnic areas, boating, an interpretive center and a number of trails. I am sure when they get this finished it will be a great State Park again! First night that bugs finally came out and bothered us! It’s a long drive down from Port Arthur and if you are looking for diesel, fill up before you get to Port Arthur.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Friday & Saturday, March 1 & 2 - Fontainebleau state Park , Mandeville, LA St. Tammany Parish This state park is an easy drive right off interstate 10 or 12. It sits on Lake Pontchartrain just a short drive into New Orleans. It was part of a huge plantation and sugar mill that sits of 2,800 acres. There are no full hookups just water and electricity but most sites are raised a little so RV’s won’t wet ground after rain storms like the ones we just had. There are hiking trails (most still under water), bike trails, picnic areas, and swimming at the beach on the lake. The park is divided into two campgrounds old and new but they are located within walking distance of each other with about 141 sites. Most backin but a good number of huge pull throughs. Mandeville is a short drive away like 2 miles for shopping etc and the Tammany Trace bike trail (32 miles) is just outside the park ranger station. The bike trail goes from Covington to Slidel. Sites are not that private but the park is peaceful.
03/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
This is one of the newest state parks in Louisiana and it is not even on many maps. At this time, the campground is closed until July 1 to work on electric problems at some of the sites. If you have a reservation they are still honoring them but your sites might be changed and you cannot have any extensions. We had a one night reservation and we were glad that we did. Beautiful park with Palmetto’s all over. Campsites are private, big, picnic tables on a cement slab, campfire pit and all sites have water and electric. The bath house was clean, clean and clean. Laundry at this time was free. One can bike ride, bird watch, rent boats, hike, fish, visit the interpretive center, rent cottages, and view wildlife. It is really pretty. You can rent a canoe and paddle between ponds on a canoe trail. It cost us $22 for the night. It is just outside Abbeville where there is shopping, restaurants like Shucks (best for seafood) and gas stations. On the drive down to the campground you can see rice paddies. We would definitely return!
03/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
Review of campground: Sunday & Monday, March 3 & 4 -Pontchartrain Landing Campground: This campground is a New Orleans waterfront RV park. We loved it. Sites are close but bearable. Full hookups with cable, Wi-fi, shuttle service to French Quarter ($5.00 round trip), pool, hot tub, boat ramp, fishing, Lighthouse Bar, entertainment nightly, dog run, and restaurant (excellent food). Tours do take off from the park, and there is plenty of informative materials at the main desk. Cost varies, but our $32 was with Passport America. We loved the restaurant and the entertainment at night. There were about 101 sites, and big rigs are welcome!
02/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Thursday, February 28 - Big Lagoon State Park, Pensacola, Florida This is the last state park on the Panhandle before one enters AL. This park has 75 campsites with water and electricity, fire rings and picnic tables. One can swim, fish, boat, crabbing and hike in this park on 678 acres. Depending on the season there are guided walks, campfire programs and recreational skills programs. There are over five miles of hiking and nature trails that take you on roads, boardwalks, sand bars and marshes. There is an observation tower to view the park, the Intracoastal Waterway, Gulf Islands National Seashore and Perdido Key. This is the beginning of the Great Florida Birding Trail. Some sites are on cement and others on hard pack dirt and sand. Many campers were staying for an overnight but others stayed for one week or more. It did feel like it was Florida in its natural state except for seeing litter on some of the hiking trails and marshes.
02/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
This campground is a gem. We enjoyed camping here two years ago in May and are enjoying it even more in February. The main problem is that if you don’t have reservations you are not getting in. Others campers we have met on our trip tried to get in when we were here and they were turned away at the gate. The campground is in walking distance to the beach, which is beautiful, and near a Wal-Mart, restaurants and shopping. There are 60 secluded campsites with water, electricity, WiFi located in four loops. Bathhouses are clean and all have laundry facilities. The hosts work hard to keep everything clean and are very informative and willing to help with any problems. One can bike, hike on the beach or on the nature trail and nearby fishing is considered one of the best spots in the USA. It is one of the most expensive Florida State Parks but it is worth it. The day we were there the weather was great for biking, hiking and walking along the ocean.
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is one of our favorites with a beautiful beach and rolling dunes covered with golden sea oats and sugar sand beaches. There are two loops in the park a newer one with full hookups and bathhouse and a smaller loop with a bathhouse that is being updated. One can swim, fish, boating, hike and bike at this park. There are bike trails along 30A that go into Seaside which is an adorable little town. We stayed in the smaller loop and really enjoyed it. This park has 2000 acres. The cost was around $24 for just water and electricity.
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Monday, February 24 – Falling Waters State Park, Chipley, FL. This park is only a little over a mile south of interstate 10 in Chipley, FL. There is a Wal-Mart just about .6 north at the same exit in the Panhandle Region. It was raining the day we arrived and had been since the night before, sometimes drenching rain. We drove down to the trails with the waterfall and sink holes before we set up camp, and it was well worth the stop. Very interesting trails, and the waterfall is the largest in the state disappearing into a sink hole. There are more trails head to the lake for swimming and others to all the sinkholes. The campground has twenty four sites, and some are pull through, and all have water, electric and grills. Many are not level since the campground is on the highest hill in Florida about 324 feet above sea level. The cost was around $24, and on Saturday nights there is a ranger led campfire get together. One can swim, fish, hike and picnic here. Good overnight stop or stay a little longer.
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
February 24, Sunday – Three Rivers State Park, Sneads, FL. This campground is off Interstate 10 about 10 miles north. There are 31 sites, and most have a lakeview, and many are lakefront. We were lucky to have a pull through 009 right on the lake with views of the dock and lake. Great site, and the campground is small but friendly with a very clean bathhouse. There is a boat dock, hiking and bike trails, canoe rentals. There are no full hookups, just water and electricity, and many sites are large enough for a large motorhome. We arrived after this campground had two days of rain, and the trails were to wet for hiking or biking, but the sites were fine. This campground is situated on two and a half miles of Lake Seminole shoreline, so it is great for fishing, canoeing, and motor boats. The lake is formed from the flint River and Chattahoochee rivers above the dam and the Apalachicola River below the dam. It is on the Florida birding trail, and it was nice and peaceful just to sit and listen to the birds, ducks, and owls right outside our site.
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Review of campground: February 21 & 22 -Stephen C. Foster State Park, Fargo, GA. This GA state park is located on the west side of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. It is quite a drive out to it, and the road into the park is 17 miles just one way so you might want to call before you come or make reservations. The cost was $28, but then with a Golden Age Pass your entrance is free, and you get an extra 20% off the campground fee. There are two loops with 68 campsites that have water, electricity, and cable. There are also cottages to rent. The bathhouses have showers and were clean. The sites are in a wooded section, and it is charming and very quiet. There are sites for tents and some big pull- throughs for RVs over 40ft. We were there on a weekday, and there were many sites open, but a storm was coming in the next day, so we did not expect a lot of campers. They are really busy the months of March and April. You can walk to the ranger station and the boat dock where you can take a river tour (well worth it), rent kayaks, canoes, motor boats etc. There is also a 5 mile self guided hike at the ranger station called The Trembling Earth Nature Trail. We have never camped here before, but we loved it even though driving out you better have everything: food, gas and an RV that isn’t going to break down because the roads are really in the woods, and you might be the only one traveling on the road.
02/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
February 23 – Suwannee River State Park, Live Oaks, FL. This is one of the original Florida State Parks in the northern part of the state right on the Suwannee River. The park has more than 1800 acres. The sites have full hookups, but it is not listed like that. This is an easy off interstate 10 in Live Oaks. There are only 30 sites at the campground. One can hike, bike, or canoe, or kayak on the river. It is also a historic site where the Confederates held off the Yankees taking over the river. Cost was $24.20 but no reservation fee. We were stunned that this campground was full even though it was a Saturday night. The campgrounds in northern Florida are not usually full in the month of February.
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is owned and managed by the island and there are over 206 sites on 18 acres. They have tent sites, full hookups and a few just water and electric. It cost $32 or more for full hookups, cable and internet but for snowbirds there is a monthly fee which seemed to be quite reasonable. Bike and Red Bug rentals can be made at the camp store. This campground was crowded in February with all the snowbirds here for the winter. I only saw a few sites available for overnighters. The snowbirds all had a lamppost with their state and names on it (cute and interesting). Everyone seems to love it here because of the biking, golfing and weather. Friendly check-in, and even though it was crowded, we loved it. There were two bathhouses and they were clean when we used them. If you need to shop like at a Wal-mart one needs to leave the island and go over the huge bridge to Brunswick which is not that far away. The campground is at one end of the island with Driftwood Beach and Clam Creek Picnic Area across the street from it. Nice visit and I know we will return because we love the bike trails and the relaxing feel of the island. There are hiking trails across the street and walking around the campground is interesting especially the little bird garden where campers have set up bird houses and nesting areas. RV’s have to pay $10 to cross over the bridge to the island, but it is well worth it.
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is another GA state park south of Savannah located on the Ogeechee River. The park consists of 1,725 acres, 65 campsites, and earthwork fort, civil war museum, boat ramps, fishing pier, playgrounds, over 4.3 miles of hiking and biking trails, fort tours, and saltwater fishing. The cost is $28 and the campsites are nestled among giant live oaks, salt marshes, and hiking trails. The campsites are very attractive and the campground is peaceful with the birds chirping away. There is a boat dock in the campground for those bringing their boats. The park is home of the best preserved earthwork fortifications of the Confederacy. It is definitely worth a visit. Visiting the Civil War Museum and Fort is an extra fee!
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a GA state park on a barrier Island just south of Savannah that has fresh and salt water estuaries and marshes. It is on the Intracoastal Waterway bordering the Skidaway Narrows. You can get a senior discount, but then they charge you a $5 daily entrance fee so it evens out. The park sits on 588 acres with 87 electric and water sites. There is a visitor center, swimming pool, playgrounds, hiking, and biking. Cabbage-Palmettos are everywhere and this campground is known for its migrating birds since it is on the Birding Trail. All the sites are shaded with Spanish Moss hanging from them. You can reserve sites but it is not site specific. Most of the sites are a good size. The bathhouse that we were near looked like it was new – very nice! Nice park. bit bit off the highway, but it is worth it once you get here.
02/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
James Island County Park, Charleston, SC – February 15 and 16. This is a county park and it is beautiful. The bathrooms in our loop are being updated but that was fine. This is a beautiful, big park with great bike trails. The sites are nice and they do have full hookups. Check in was quick and the workers were nice and very informative. This park is open year round and their Holiday Festival of Lights from mid November to late December is very popular. The park offers a lot -salt and fresh water fishing, off leash dog park, bike trails, playground, cottages, shuttle service to Charleston, playground area, water splash area, kayak rentals and hiking trails through the marshes with birds, turtles, alligators and geese. The cost depends on the discounts you have Good Sam etc and others. Need to follow the directions from the campground not your GPS. This is our second visit to this park and we will return.
02/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground is along the Intracoastal Waterway and part of the Francis Marion National Forest right off of route 17 about 30 miles north of Charleston, SC. Sites are spacious but in an open area. One can put in their boats on the Intracoastal Waterway for touring, fishing and shrimp baiting. All kinds of fish are found here and one is close by boat to the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge and Bulls Bay which is the coasts best shrimp baiting area. All the sites can view the Intracoastal Waterway and watch fishing boats as well as pleasure boats sail pass the campsites. There is also a hiking trail (Palmetto Trail) in the park which crosses the state of SC. This trail is used for biking, hiking, and horseback riding. Full hookup sites are available. Bathrooms need to be updated but they were clean. It cost with Golden Age Pass about $10 but if you reserve you have an additional fee. I have always heard nice things about this campground and it is a good stopover or for even longer periods of time especially if you have a boat and like to fish. Host was informative and available. We stopped for only one night and two thirds of the sites were taken and almost all of them were reserved for the weekend so reservations might be necessary.
02/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Wednesday, Feb 13, 2013: Myrtle Beach State Park, Myrtle Beach, SC. This park can be a little difficult to find with all the construction going on, but it is a beautiful place. $23 a night with water and electricity. It is located right on the Grand Strand and is a very popular campground; reservations are needed – even now two loops were filled. There is a campground, cabins, beach, fishing pier, nature center, and playgrounds throughout the park, and it is a great place to ride bikes. It is near everything on the strip, yet it is very peaceful and beautiful. One can ride their bikes before May 1 and after Labor Day right on the beach during low tide. Sites are shaded in five loops but are not that private. Nice campground! The check-in staff was informative, friendly, and very helpful.
02/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Killens Ponds State Pond State Park, Felton, DE. This park is situated around a picturesque millpond and is open year round. There were only four campers there when we arrived, but it has electric hookups, frost free water spigots throughout the park, and a huge bathhouse with showers which is nice when you are still in the winter season and below freezing. We could see the pond from our site. This park has a lot to offer especially in the warmer weather – fields, biking trails, store, canoeing, Frisbee golf, horseshoes, nature program, interpretive center, pond fishing, volleyball courts, walking trails, and a water park. Sites are on gravel in the woods. It was very quiet when we arrived but hundreds of birds were flying overhead – migrating. Maybe because of the northeasterner or the other storm coming up from the south the birds were very confused where to ride out the two storms. DE just increased their fees for camping so the out of state fee with hookups was $30, but they do have a senior discount. Nice park, and if you're looking for a one night or more stopover with electric it’s a great place to stay especially in the winter. If you check in after the rangers are gone you drive to the campground and pick up a registration form at the check-in or store and fill it out and place in the holder (they don’t accept credit cards or checks though) – take a map and then drive and find a site.
06/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
We stayed at Fishermen's for four nights attending my high school reunion. It is a very nice campground with four main sections. A full hookup area with some sites overlooking the clamming flats. Another section with water and electric, a tenting area that an RV can stay without services, and a wooded section with water and electric. Bathrooms need to be updated especially the showers. This campground is near the fishing village of Galilee with its seafood markets, restaurants, and beaches. The Block Island ferry can be picked up from here also. One can drive through Narragansett along ocean road which is beautiful and also visit the Lighthouse and Cronin's fishing area with a beautiful view, beach, and fishing area which is free. There are at least three RI state beaches within 2 miles of the campground, but for out of staters, the cost to get in is high thanks to our Governor. Newport is just a drive across the bridge away and can be spotted from the sea wall along ocean road. There is no problem with visitors and they do not charge. On Sunday mornings there is a farmers market right at the campground. It is nice to bike around the campground as well as along the escape road to Galilee and to some other great restaurants on Route 108. There are basketball courts, tennis courts, and fields. Great place to stay if you can get in. Reservations are taken, but they go fast; yet there were about ten sites open the four nights we were there June 14-18th. We enjoyed the seafood and especially buying steamers and lobsters at the fish market to bring back to our site to enjoy!
05/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is right off I-95 between New Haven and New London and is situated on the Long Island Sound. Easy off and on. We camped here for one night since we were so close to home in RI. Came in on Memorial Day while everyone was going home. We did not have reservations but no problems during this week - they were totally booked for the weekend. 558 open sites but some are nicely shaded and so many different loops. There is a small section with hookups but we dry camped and had a very nice site. Three comfort stations were in close walking to our site. Great for riding bikes, three main beach areas and hiking areas. They have a concession, dump station, salt water swimming and fishing. Fireplaces not provided but you can bring your own. CT has been increasing their prices every year and for an out of stater $33 for dry camping is expensive and $3 of it was for a reservation fee even if you didn't make a reservation.
05/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is right off I-95 between New Haven and New London and is situated on the Long Island Sound. Easy off and on. We camped here for one night since we were so close to home in RI. There are 160 wooded and open sites located in five sites. We were in Osprey loop and it was very nice. There were only 11 other sites taken because it was during the week. The campground had been full for the holiday weekend before. Our site was well shaded. You can ride bikes down to the beach and along the refuge - interesting. It cost us $33 because we were from out of state - expensive for dry camping. They also charge you $3.00 for a reservation fee even if you don't make a reservation. There is concession, dump station, showers, salt water fishing and swimming. No pets are allowed. There was an incident during the evening with one of the campers about ten sites away from us and the rangers, local and state police came quickly and removed the person camping. I think he had too much of something! Leaving the next morning the check in lady says nothing like that ever happens here. I was impressed how they handled the problem and how quickly it was resolved.
05/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a State of Rhode Island park that is walking distance to the ocean. It is a parking lot that holds 75 RV's, and you must be self contained to stay here - no hookups. They do have about 7 bathrooms (fancy pits?), but they were not open when we were there, only opening up Memorial Weekend until Labor Day or the end of the season. There are about 10 sites right on the Breachway where one can fish off of rocks, and every site has a view of the Breachway or the pond. $14 is in state fee, the out of state fee is $20. There is no dump station here, but you can use the one at Burlingame State Park about 15 minutes away. This campground can be used as a base to tour all the seaside communities in this section of RI with some great seafood restaurants. What this campground has is a beautiful beach two minutes away from your site and a great fishing area and boating area. One can also kayak or canoe the pond. The weather was great when we were there, so the sunsets and sunrises were spectacular! Good spot to watch birds and deer across the pond. The only negative is that we do not tow a car behind our RV and others that do many times park their cars behind your RV so that you can't get out. If their RV or 5th wheel does not fit into their sites including their cars there is parking in the general public parking lot for them, but who wants to pay extra. It was not crowded in early May when we went so it was very enjoyable. If you did not know that this campground was there as you take the road to Charlestown Beach you might think you had taken the wrong road, but you continue between the beach and the public parking lot past a lot of summer houses and the road ends at the Breachway. Great place for a stopover or to spend a week at the beach. They do take reservations online through Reserve America.
04/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
4/16-4/18 Pickwick Dam Tailwater Campground run by the TVA. Pickwick Landing, TN. This was our first time camping at a TVA campground and we enjoyed it. It’s a self-service campground with 95 sites and the majority of them offer level sites, water and electricity. There are heated restrooms with one shower but the bathrooms are used by fishermen and others just driving through. The campground is set in some pretty tall trees and one can watch the barges going through the dam during the day. Fishing, bird watching, riding bikes, people watching and visiting Savannah, TN and Shiloh National Military Park are all available. Also eating at the Inn at the Pickwick Landing State Park which is only across the bridge and also at Hady’s Hotel and Catfish just north of Shiloh are good choices. Some consider the catfish at Hady’s the best in the south. Adamsville,TN is close for a visit to Buford Pusser Home and Museum (sheriff from Walking Tall fame).
04/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This state park is right off the Natchez Trace located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains and it is very pretty. The sites goes around a lake but it is one road in and out. The site we had was fine for a 25 foot RV with electricity and water. There are some larger sites for bigger units sites 29-62 at the end of the loop but still on Haynes Lake. Very peaceful looking out over the lake. The park is named for the leader of the Chickasaw nation, Chief Tishomingo. There are massive rock formations and fern-filled crevices here that you can not find anywhere else in MS. Wildflowers line the entrance as well as the trails the Indians used to roam. The park also has a boat launching ramp, cabins, disc golf, nature center, swimming pool in the summer, picnic areas, fields for softball and baseball, a historic cabin, trails for hiking and wildlife viewing. We really enjoyed this campground yet others had told us that they didn’t think we would. I think it was because they had 5th wheels and the road could be a little tight for one pulling something that large. The ranger, host that checked us in was very helpful. They even have a Bear Creek Float Trip from April through October for a 6.25 mile ride down the creek leaving from swinging bridge.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Grand Isle State Park (226 acres) is located north of Burlington on the island of Grand Isle one of the Lake Champlain Islands. This park has 117 campsites with no hookups, 36 lean-to shelters and some cabins. Many sites are not level. There is a play area and Nature Center and a small grassy beach where one can swim but the swim area has a lot of rocks. There are four loops and one loop for generators only. Most sites are on grass in a woods area but there are some near some open spaces. The lean-to which were very popular when we were there are on a cliff looking out over the lake. Great for those tenting! Since we were camping in the fall during the week there were only about ten others camping in the park. This was a one night stay for us since we were traveling around northern Vermont. It is on the route to Montreal so they have a lot of over night people. We enjoyed our stay here and visited the Grand Isle State Fish Hatchery and Vermont’s oldest vineyard and grape winery Snow Farm Winery.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Overnight stay Mt. Ascutney State Park is just off I-91 at exit 8 between White River Junction and Brattleboro, Vermont. There are 39 tent/trailer sites located in two loops in the woods. We have a 25ft RV and had no problems fitting in. There were no pull throughs but some of the sites are big enough for at least a 30 footer. You can not drive up the Mt road to the summit with any RV over 24 feet but the campground itself is at the bottom of the mountain. There are no hookups but there is a restroom with one shower which is pay like all Vermont State Parks. The park costs $18 per site and there are also 10 lean-to shelters, the parkway auto road, extensive hiking trails, picnic shelters, wildlife viewing and sometimes you can spot someone hang gliding from the top of the mountain. There is a recreation field within walking distance from some sites and a number of the hiking trails take off from the camping area. The small village of Ascutney is a short drive away for restaurants, gas and other stores. This was another CCC campground. The auto road in the summer is used for auto, bikes and running races up the road.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Button Bay State Park, Ferrisburgh, Vermont Friday – September 9, 2011. No hookups There are 55 campsites here located in two loops most on grass and if they have had heavy rains like after the hurricane some are underwater. This campground is located down some back roads that are very scenic and when you arrive it is beautiful looking out over Lake Champlain and the mountains of New York in the distance. We were there for one overnight on a beautiful sunny day with the temperature around 80 degrees the second week in September. Bathrooms were very clean and like all Vermont State Parks showers are pay. Vermont charges $20 for sites with a view and $18 if you are you do not. There is a swimming pool in the park during the summer months, a playground, picnic area. It is located 6 miles off of route 7 in western Vermont. We would return if we were in the area.
09/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a city campground that is very popular so reservations should be made during the summer and on weekends. The cost with water and electricity was $31. The campground has pay showers, 29 full hook-ups, 39 water and electric and 69 tent sites. It opens in May and closes in October. One has to call to make reservations. This campground is in the great little town of Burlington home to the University of Vermont and 5 other colleges. As you drive down to the waterfront you see beautiful Lake Champlain. There is a bike trail that goes right by the campground to downtown Burlington where one can take a free shuttle up to Church Street Market. Church street is closed off for cars and has a very exciting mix of stores and restaurants with plenty of outdoor cafes. The bike trail goes by the waterfront and also heads up through the Lake Champagne islands to Canada. North Beach is also walking distance from the campground for sunbathing and swimming. Sites were shaded but not all were level. Check in is after 1 and they are strict about that but the host was friendly and very informative. This town has a college atmosphere and it is a wonderful place to camp and visit.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Overnight stay $26 for water and electricity. They do have full hookups and Wi-Fi. Showers and bathrooms are old but clean. This campground is on route 2 right next to a camper dealer where if no one is at the office you will have to register. The campground is open year round and near places to tour like the Bragg Farm and Sugarhouse, Montpelier with Vermont’s capitol and a short drive to Waterbury where Ben and Jerry’s and many other attractions. They do have many seasonal campers who all state that they like the owners of the park. Sites are close together with not much privacy but we enjoyed our stay here and will return.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Overnight stay $18 no hookups, 27 campsites, 23 lean-to shelters, 5 cabins, This is one of at least 4 campgrounds in this forest all on different lakes. 17 miles of hiking trails and a multi-use trail trail over 20 miles used for biking, walking, snowmobiling, and horseback riding. It is in the wilderness but it is beautiful in the forest. We were in a RV loop of about 5 sites and since we are only 25 feet we did not have any problems backing into the sites. The RV loop is not on the water but most of the other loops for tenting are. Check in was quick and easy and the bathrooms were clean. Off of interstate 89 this is about a 20 mile drive on some twisting roads that go up and down the Mountains.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Smugglers Notch State Park, Stowe, Vermont September 15 & 16 $20 no hookups. This campground was moved in 2003 from across the street so the bathrooms are new and very clean but only one shower (pay). There is only about 19 sites but only about 6 or 7 that RV’s can fit into and it is on a mountain but you can get level. One would suggest reservations if you are headed this way but during the week in the Fall you may get a site. The sites are a good size but some are hard to back up into. It is near Mt. Mansfield ski area and the Stowe Lodge Resort. There are hiking trails from the campground and it is an easy drive to the quaint village of Stowe for shopping , restaurants and a bike trail. This is a four season resort area with plenty to do in every season. It is considered the best ski resort in the state. Very pretty area and we would definitely return. RV’s should know that they can only drive up to the Gondola section of the resort because they have to turn around since they are not allowed to drive the five miles over the mountain to the Smugglers Notch Ski area so must use route 100 and drive around about 30 miles. If one is going to try the bike trail there is parking at the church to the right to get on the trail but not parking in the rest of the town. This is a wonderful area to camp in but if your RV is over 28 to 30 feet I don’t know if I would come up here but we did see some big campers on route 100.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Elmore State Park is huge with over 36 square miles of land. There is a beautiful lake in the park which is a walk away from the campground with the Elmore Mountains in the background. The campground is laid out in two big loops and many of the sites are huge and very private. There are 45 tent and RV sites and 15 lean-to’s which Vermont seems to have in most of their state park. Restrooms are clean and the showers are pay. At the lake one can canoe and swim and they just built a new building with bathrooms and a lobby with rocking chairs, stone fireplace and picnic tables. This was a one night stopover for us while traveling Vermont in the Fall. Rangers were very nice and we would return but there are no hookups. The town is close to Stowe, Waterbury and Montpelier and is a popular tourist destination in the summer.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Shelburne Campground, Shelburne, Vermont Site 11. Stopped here while camping in Vermont right after the floods closed many of the state parks in the central part of the state. $36 for water,electric, Wi-Fi, cable TV and full hookups are available. There are two pools, play area, volleyball, tether ball, horseshoe pits, store, restaurant, motel, fire rings, firewood, propane, laundry, showers, store. This is an older park with over 60 sites and our site was a backin with some gravel and grass. Chick-in was quick and the owners are very nice and informative. They will give you discounts for the Shelburne Museum which is worthwhile. This is located right on route 7 just a few miles below Burlington and on route 7 with all of it’s attractions. Museums, winery, shops, gas, restaurants, breweries etc. Great location. We would return because of its location!
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground and most of the sites are right on the Connecticut River. We stayed one night on a rainy day on our way to northern Vermont right after the floods from Hurricane Irene that shut down much of the state. Nice campground but narrow road to get to the sites. We have a 25ft Fleetwood Pulse and we could fit in most sites but I would not want to drive down the narrow road with something bigger. No hookups but the sites are all shaded with a connecting trail on the cliff above the river. They do offer canoe trips from here where they will drop you off north of the campground and you paddle down and pull in at the campground. The staff was very nice and at the ranger station campers are welcome to enjoy their outside fireplace with a roaring fire and a cozy little room inside the building to meet others. Showers are extra but the restroom was old but very clean. It was not hard to get a site during the week during the fall on a rainy day but they do recommend getting reservations.
06/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Our cost was without electricity $24. This was a first time in a long time, that we actually had a host or ranger to check in with. This park has only about 6 sites with electricity and 3 are taken by a host. There are some pull -throughs but on grass. Nice campground with two loops in a figure 8 pattern. The campground road used to be a one-way, made it much quieter. This is a convenient stop for us coming from New England for a one night stopover. Restroom was clean. Most of the campers the night we were here, were families tenting and it was very enjoyable!
06/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is located along the Potomac River below DC. There are three camping loops in the park two with hookups. The bathrooms are older but clean and the sites look like they were redone a few years ago, with sites for long RV’s and the most of them are level. New Visitor Center this year! There is a pool which campers can use about ¼ mile away near the picnic area and boat area. Hiking trails throughout the park. Sites are well shaded. We stayed here two nights so that we could visit the George Washington Birthplace national Monument 4 miles away and Stratford Hall a mile away. Home of the Lees of Virginia and birthplace of Robert E. Lee. Good stop and we would return to visit some of the other attractions in the area.
06/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
Our cost with a Good Sam discount was around $33. Full hookups, cable TV, Wi-Fi, pool, little waterslide, game room, clean restrooms, easy off and on from 95. Historic sites near by! We could have stayed overnight at the Wal-Mart at the next exit, but it was near 100 so we wanted electricity to put on the air conditioner. This campground has no shade, but we enjoyed our stay here and definitely will return when traveling 95. Might even stay a few days to tour around. The pool and hot tub had just opened three weeks ago, so everything was new with a great little water slide that my husband and I had all to ourselves. We had a blast! This campground is also near the Roanoke Rapids Theatre. Willie Nelson was playing the weekend we were here.
06/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Our cost was about $25 with full hookups and was cheaper with our AARP card. This campground is part of the huge South of the Border Complex. 100 sites, many pull-throughs that are paved, and other sites are gravel. Easy checkin in the new campground office. This is situated behind a gas station and fireworks store. Bathrooms are older but very clean and they leave out little soaps which is a nice touch. Campers can swim in the indoor and outdoor pools of the motel. The last time we camped here was 20 years ago and it is good for one night. A number of restaurants and shops to visit. There were 11 RV’s the night we were here, most were gone by 8:30 in the morning. But their busiest season is when schools are out. We did not have the smell that some of the other reviewers complained about. We would camp here again.
06/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
Our site was $54 plus tax for full hookups: Wi-Fi, cable TV, tennis courts, two pools, hot tub, fitness center, concrete pads, restaurant, water sports, marina, boat launch and fuel dock, ship store and beer and wine sales. Some sites on the waterfront. Most of the sites are owned but rented out when the owners are not here; and they do have sites for purchase. This campground is located at the entrance to Hilton Head Island and a short drive away from the bike trails, beaches, shopping and restaurants. Traffic is heavy on this island but there are some beaches that do have RV slots for parking, but most places do not allow RVs. One really needs a car to tour this island, but we did enjoy our stay. With an RV just 25 feet, we were able to drive around and find parking. We would return to this park. Check in was easy and you get to choose your site by driving around in one of their golf carts to select the one you want. The front desk workers were very nice and informative. The beaches are beautiful with soft sand and warm water to swim in.
06/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a county campground with 220 sites that are well shaded. Full hookups with cable TV, internet, and store for $30 a night. Sites are very close together and some seem hard to get into with a big rig. We had a nice site at the end of a loop, so it was bigger than many of the others. Restrooms are older but very clean and the water is hot, hot, hot for a shower. Checkin was fast, efficient and the girl who checked us in was very nice. There is a nice bird sanctuary at the end of the campground. What this campground has, is that it is on Jekyll Island with its beaches, bike trails, historic district and controlled development. Great island and place to stay.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Over 100 full hookup sites for $30 per day with tax and rates reset every July. Located on 1,100 acress off of route 303. The park has swimming, boating, fishing and all the sites are well shaded. We enjoyed our stay here for just two nights, even though we spent more time touring the Golden Isles such as St. Simons Island. Close to restaurants, shops and historic sites. Plenty to do in this area and we would return to this park.
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
We have camped here so many times by ourselves and with the kids: it is one of our favorite parks. It is a good first and last stop in Florida. This state park has 139 sites in seven loops, all with water, electricity and shade. That is why we love it! Some of the most shaded sites that we have camped in, which are a walk away from the beach. The beach is beautiful and one can kayak, fish, surf, and wind surf in the inlet. This park is an easy ten minute ride into the historic town of St. Augustine where you can visit historic sites like the fort, shop in the quaint shops and eat at a number of good restaurants many with tables outside. They now have a parking lot for RV’s a few streets back from the visitor center, which is free. We will always stop at this park when driving through Florida. That is, if the present governor doesn’t sell all the Florida State Parks like he plans on doing.
05/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
Park has 54 sites with no hookups and 106 with full hookups. We paid $16 with a Golden Age Pass. We only stayed one night and were glad that we made a reservation. They were turning away campers the Thursday before Memorial Weekend. One can hike, bike, paddle canoes, fish, picnic, bird watching and swim, snorkel and scuba in the springs. The is a natural spring with potassium, magnesium and sodium salts, so hence the name Salt Springs. There is no privacy in the campground but it is still very nice. In the springs and you could see a lot of colorful fish, some otters and a few Manatees. Very refreshing! It was not crowded at all during the week but school gets out in the next week so most weeks in the summer and especially the weekends, it will be crowded.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park has three camping loops with dirt roads and just electricity and water. We were the only ones in the Magnolia 2 loop when we got here, but other campers came in right after us. The road is meant for one vehicle at a time, so if two RV’s have to pass, one will have to pull over into a site. The Hickory Loop is much better for bigger RV’s and the walk to the springs is closer but we did enjoy our site. This spring is one of the biggest in Florida which discharges over 100 million gallons per day. There a lot to do at this park. One can swim, snorkel or scuba dive in the springs. There are over 8.5 miles of hiking trails throughout the park. One of the best things to do is to walk the boardwalks that go through the swamps along the springs and out to the Suwannee River which exits to the Gulf at this spot. There are alligators, carp and sturgeon in the river. In the winter the Manatees swim up to the spring. That is why this campground is popular during those months, because of all the great viewing areas to watch them. The springs in the winter are warmer for the Manatees than the rivers or the Gulf. We would have loved to see them! The sturgeon are amazing: leaping out of the water every few minutes, twisting their bodies around before smacking back into the water. One other camper told us that they jump more as it gets warmer. That in June on nights with the full moon, they are flipping all over the place and it is quite a sight. The park has canoes that can be rented to paddle the river and part of the springs. One can rent the canoes even during the winter months, but there are strict instructions about paddling around the Manatees. This is a beautiful park and we will return. The deer in the park are not afraid of anyone. In the morning we had 6 deer eating away and just staring at us as we were getting ready to leave the park. People feed them and they expected that food!
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
This campground on a barrier island is along the “forgotten coast of Florida” and at the end of the Panhandle. It is located on the eastern end of the island and has nine miles of undeveloped beaches and dunes with the Gulf on one side and the Apalachicola Bay on the other. 1,962 acres are laid out in a very long narrow strip and much of it you need a permit to drive on the dirt road to get to the end of the spit. Along the paved section there are pullouts with boardwalks to the beach and then you have two developed areas with showers and changing rooms. The campground is in two loops back to back but there are shady sites among the pines and coastal scrub bushes in this arid climate. One can fish, swim, bike, kayak, boating, hiking, bird watching for Bald Eagles and Ospreys and for the fall and spring bird migration. The little town of St. George four miles from the ranger station is cute with bike trails, shops, restaurants, historic lighthouse and museum and little beach houses to rent. Nice place to camp but make sure you make reservations because it was full both nights we were here with waiting lists to get in.
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
This campground is located in what they call the “Forgotten coast of the Florida Panhandle.” There are two loops Gulf Breeze and Shady Pine. We stayed in the Gulf Breeze loop because it is closer to the Gulf and a little cooler, but Shady Pine is a prettier loop with the tall pines. They both have two bathhouses within walking distance on boardwalks to the beaches on the Gulf. The walk is a little shorter from the Gulf Breeze loop. The beaches have that white quartz sand of the Panhandle, but not the Caribbean blue water, even though they claim that they do. Nice park but bring everything you need because it is a long drive out here. One can swim in the Gulf or in the Bay. Fishing, boating and snorkeling, swimming, hiking, bike riding and bird watching are all available. The park has 2516 acres surrounded on two sides by the ocean and Bay. It is on the Florida Bird Watching trail and 243 species have been seen here, especially in the fall when the park becomes a stopover for the migration of birds on their way south. There are even birding and wildflower tours offered at this time. We saw beautiful sunsets and sun rises from the beach. Make sure you make reservations because it was full when we camped here in May, and it seems to be a place that the “snowbirds” like to stay during the winter. We would return to camp at this state park.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This state park is in the southern section of Panama City right along the coast. The 175 sites are located right on the Big Lagoon. Our site was shaded with a hard sand bottom. If you have a boat, one could dock it right off the site. There is swimming available in the Lagoon and at the beaches along the gulf. Beautiful state park with a nice reception area which has interpretative displays as well as a little video about the park itself. The campground has a Florida feel to it with tall pines, palm trees, birds, sand, boat and fishing docks, and bugs. Check in was quick and easy and the girl that checked us in was very nice. The campground is located within easy drive of all the Panama City attractions, beaches, restaurants, hotels and fish markets. Along the jetties at the beach, one can snorkel and enjoy the colorful fish. Since this beach is along the Panhandle, the water has a Caribbean blue to it with that white, cool quartz sand. One can ride their bikes in the park and stop by the Buttonwood Marsh and Gator Lake overlooks, where you can find alligators and lots of Heron and Egrets in the bushes. They are so pretty to watch. We enjoyed our stay at this park and will return!
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
Was $24 plus tax for water and electricity in the older loop. The newer loop cost is $30 plus tax, with full hookups and a newer bathroom, but this loop does not have much shade or privacy. We stayed in the older loop with gravel roads because these sites are smaller and we can fit with a 25 foot RV. The site we had faced the bay and you could see the dunes of the beach across from the bay. It was a beautiful site with shade, privacy, views and we really loved it. It felt like “old Florida” with the palm trees. We could walk or ride our bikes over to the beach and it was another beautiful Panhandle beach. This park is in the coastal lowlands and it has three dune lakes within the park. One wakes up to birds chirping with great sun rises and sunsets. The little town of Grayton Beach is quaint with small restaurants that have outside seating under umbrellas. There is a bike trail just outside the park going along the highway into town and beyond. We enjoyed our stay at this park and would return.
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
Park has an excellent Trailer Life Rating: in the top 1% of the nation. 154 RV sites plus tenting sites and cabins This used to be a private park before it was bought or given to the state. It has everything: full hookups, cable TV, underground water sprinklers, laundry, basketball court, swimming pool, shuffle board, club house, cabins, tenting area, camp store, playgrounds, shuttle to the beach, bike trail to the beach and their fresh water lake. The park has 1,643 acres including over 3 miles of beach, some coastal dune lakes, cypress domes, and wet prairies. Easy checkin and the person that checked us in was very nice and informative. Nice campground and we would return. This campground is big with a lot of sites and can be confusing at first, but it does have that Florida resort feel to it.
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
This park has water, electricity, laundry, clothesline posts, showers, a nature trail, and a boardwalk to beach. It's close to Wal-Mart, restaurants and other shopping. Friendly and efficient checkin. Need reservations and it's hard to get in. They put "campground full" signs out, but many times they will let you camp if you are just passing through for one night. One can fish, bike ride, swim, surf at this park. The beach is beautiful and the sites are all good. Exceptional pull through sites. Most sites are very private because of the dense undergrowth. We met so many campers that rave about this campground since it has won awards for best in Florida and the nation. It lived up to our expectations and we will definitely return. Our hosts were very friendly and will to help if you needed it.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Sites all have full hookups. Most sites in the sun but many do have some shade. Sites are spread out in three huge loops plus more. This is a big park. Check in was fast and friendly. Most sites that could be reserved were reserved but they still leave a lot of sites for first come first serve and they let you stay longer if you want too. There is a pool, tennis courts, playground, boat dock, volleyball courts, laundry, nature center, activity center and camp store. This is a very nice park along the canal and two lakes. Quick drive to the beach. Good place to ride bikes. We would stay here again.
04/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
We headed toward the Natural Bridge Area and it was very confusing at first to find the campground since this resort is huge and you are traveling on route 11 as you go by other camping areas. This area reminds of Franconia Notch area in NH. We were assigned a great site backed up to the mountain with the river out our back door. There were little bridges to cross over to get to the restrooms and the ranger station. Since there was a storm coming with high winds, heavy rain and tunnel clouds, we changed sites to get on the other side of the river for safety reasons. Many things to do in this area bird watching, boating, museums, nature centers, ranger walks, history talks, recreation programs and hiking from the campground and in the Red River Gorge Area and Daniel National Forest. Don’t drive a RV over 25 foot around the gorge because route 15 and 715 are curvy and very narrow and not many places to turn around. We did not try to go through the Nada Tunnel because our Pulse is 11’8 in height and would not dare to do it. Very pretty area and this campground is nice with a number of sites big enough for big rigs including some pull -throughs. Most have electricity and water. One can tent here and at the other campground just down the street. Slade has restaurants, shops and gas stations. We would definitely return to visit this area again when the weather is better.
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
This is a charming campground of two loops set in the forest with the Blackwater River a five minute walk away. Sites are very nice and level. There are even clotheslines at each site. Bathrooms are spotless. Sites are set in the forest and well shaded. You can walk to the river and sit on the white sand or just sit in the river and talk to those tubing or canoeing by. River is one of the purest sand bottom rivers in the world where one finds sandbars and places to stop and swim all along it. The Florida birding and canoe trail goes through here. It is beautiful. One should reserve because only half the sites were filled on this Thursday night but the campground was considered full because all the sites were reserved for the weekend. Other campers told us that weekends and all through the summer this campground is full. Outfitters will take you 11 miles upstream to canoe or tube downstream and meet you at a bridge just below the campground. Price for tubing was reasonable. You can also rent a canoe for all day or three days and canoe the whole trail through this park of 31 miles and camp on the sandbars. We were so glad that we came here even for just one night but would need two to really enjoy the tubing or canoeing on the river.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Located on Santa Rosa Island right next to Pensacola Beach. There is an entrance fee $8 for a week per carload and then a camping fee. Golden Age pass no fee and camping half price $10 for water and electricity. Reservations can be made for March through October and it is strongly suggested that you have them. Most sites were taken the two nights we were there.One can swim in the Gulf of Mexico or Pensacola Bay. This is a beautiful area with white sand beaches with hardly anyone on them. We were in loop A and could walk the broad walk to the Gulf. The beach is stunning! A half mile from the campground one can visit Ft. Pickens, Visitor Center, the bunkers around the fort, or sit on the seawall watching the Blue Angels practice on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings from the Naval Base across the bay. We even saw campers scuba diving and snorkeling on the bay side. So many campers had told us to stay here and we were not disappointed. It is a beautiful area that had been devastated from Katrina and rebuilt.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Golden Age Pass on rate. This is a National Park Self Registration Campground next to a marsh. Some sites are shaded with oaks and some are not. Quiet campground and within walking distance of a picnic area, fields, boat ramp, marsh overlooks, trails, biking, and about a mile from the visitor center. This area was hit hard from Katrina and the visitor center has only been reopened within the last year and they are still working on replacing trail markers. Stopped for one night but we would stop again. Miles of beaches are within driving distance from this campground. Pretty area right off 90. This campground does not have reservations and we were there on a Sunday night and there were plenty of sites still available.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
$35 for cable TV, water, electricity, Wi-Fi, 24 security, picnic tables, showers, laundry, free shuttle to the casino and back, use of the facilities like the pool and hot tub at the Casino Hotel. If you get a players card you might even get your camping for free depending on how much you spent in the gambling hall. The drive into the Hollywood Casino is very pretty with all the Palm Trees lining the roads. The RV Park is in walking distance of the casino and the campers are located in a figure eight layout with some trees providing shade throughout the park (I think there were more trees before Katrina). This whole area was devastated by Katrina and there is building going on all over the gulf. It is very nice. The check in was quick and the lady at the desk very nice and informative. Bathrooms are clean. The lunch buffet for $10 is very good from 11-3. We would return for another one night stay!
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
$30 a night for water, electric, cable, Wi-Fi, swimming pool, hot tub, great showers, free tour of the Plantation and gardens, short walk to the Mississippi. I know the ratings for this campground have been mixed but we loved it. There are a number of permanent sites here but we were near the pool and bathrooms almost by ourselves on a cement slab. Showers are great. My husband said I better give it a ten because of everything it offers. We enjoyed it and it was on River Road where the plantations are so it is close to Houmas House, Laura, Oak Alley and other plantations for tours. Check in was easy even though you had to drive in and all the way around to reach the office, that is because they will be putting a new entrance road in next to the office. The owner gave us all sorts of ideas about what to do from walking across the street to see the sunset on the Mississippi to a local restaurant with fiddlers on Thursday night. Planned on staying one night but stayed two. River Road is not that pretty even with the Mississippi on the right – there are so many oil companies, sugar cane companies and others all along the road but the campground is peaceful. They had not had rain in over two months here so everything was dry and yet the river was starting to flood. We had met a couple from Ontario in Natchez the night before and they had stayed here before traveling north. They told us that they really enjoyed staying at this campground too. The morning we were leaving the owner gave us a tour of the Poche Plantation Home that he and his wife have been restoring. Interesting history and worth the tour plus it was free!
05/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
Cost $18 for electric and water. This campground is about ten miles north of historic Natchez just off the Trace. There are two loops set back from a lake. We stayed in loop B where most of the RV’s were camped on level cement pads: this section was redone about five years ago and it is quite nice. Sites are not all that private but the woods do surround you with nature hikes to and around the lake. The campground offers boating, cabins, disc golf, fishing, hiking, laundry, and wildlife viewing. We stayed here for three nights while we toured the historic sites in Natchez and Washington. This is the second campground that we have found stray dogs left behind by “snowbirds.” Another camper next to us who lives in Mexico during the winter and Canada in the summer said it is a big problem and it is happening more and more. Campers just leave cats and dogs behind when they head home after the winter. Sad! We would camp here again. We met a friendly group of campers here from all over the states and Europe.
05/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
We drove down from Vicksburg on 61 to Grand Gulf Road to get to this state park. The drive off of 61 is about 7 miles on a curvy road but even big rigs won’t have problems with it. You do drive by a Nuclear Plant. The lower loop campground is easier for big rigs to get into because the upper loop is straight up a short hill. We selected the upper because it has better TV reception and my husband wanted to watch the Celtics/Heat playoff game. The park itself is interesting and hilly. Your campground fee allows you to drive or walk around the park. There is a museum which displays the history of Grand Gulf, the civil war battle that took place here and how the Mississippi River affects the small town. Outside the museum there is an old church, water mill and house, Fort Wade, Spanish House, Old Grand Gulf Cemetery, Rifle Pits, Observation Tower, Gun Emplacements. We walked around the whole park on a hot, humid day and it was the first time in four weeks that we have been attacked by bugs. There is a half mile drive across the street to the banks of the Mississippi where you can see barges coming and going but we could not drive or bike it because most of the road is already underwater and they expect that when the river crests by May 15 most of this park will be underwater.
04/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Checked in to our campground the Ameristar Casino RV Park across the street from the riverboat casino. Interesting park with full hookups, Wi-Fi, pool, laundry, cable all for $22.50 and a free shuttle to the casino. Checked out the casino and the buffet that afternoon. Enjoyed the buffet and the casino even though we are not gamblers. This park is located right off interstate 20 and you can hear the traffic from the highway and the trains as they go across the tracks over the river. There are also five other casinos all within about a half of mile of each other. Vicksburg also has mansions to visit and two scenic tours to follow which go by all the interesting places to visit in the city especially their famous murals downtown. Close to the National Military Park, this battlefield can be an all day excursion.
04/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is part of the county system and there is another one on this huge reservoir on the outskirts of the capitol city Jackson. The campground is huge and it was good that we made reservations because it was full. Check in lady was so nice and efficient. Told us what to do in case a tornado hit because the sirens were going off but we were fine all day. Many campers come and pay for the season and there were a lot of home schooled children here. We did not get a lakeside campsite because we had made a reservation but it was fine because we were in a quieter section backed up to the bike trails. There are bike trails that go all around the reservoir and this reservoir is huge. The campground is near shopping, gas, restaurants and a short drive to Jackson. The park next to it is beautiful and a good place to walk and bike. There are tennis courts over there, a marina, picnic tables and great views of the reservoir. The one negative complaint I have is that the bathrooms (2 buildings) need to be upgraded. They were dirty, no toilet paper, two showers not really private and not enough for all the campers there. We enjoyed our two day stay here and there is also a pool and playground.
04/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
Sites not numbered. Free – This campground is in the recreational area of the Rocky Springs Site. No electricity or water but water at the bathrooms. This campground needs some work. Sites need to be leveled and repaved. We had driven down here on the Trace to avoid some violent storms that were going through Jackson for two days and it was a good stop. There were four other campers in the park for the first night and only us for the second. Another camper had told us three weeks earlier the snowbirds heading home on the Trace squeezed 43 RV’s in 19 sites. The Rocky Springs Site and trail in the park is fascinating with the old church, dried out springs and markers for the whole town in the woods. This park is also near Port Gibson which was not burned by Grant because it was too beautiful on his march through MS. The Windsor ruins are worth the drive to go see. If we traveled the Trace again we would stay here for a one night stay. It was very peaceful! Just a note about three hours after we left this campground a tornado was seen heading for it right up the Trace.
04/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
This campground is located four miles off the Natchez Trace, 21 miles below Tupelo, MS. All sites have lake view but the majority are right on the lake and if you have a boat it can be tied up right next to your site. There are fishing piers, boat ramp, landing piers for water skiing and a swimming beach. Bird watching is very popular here. The sites are a good size but they are not private. There are tall trees all through the campground and it is really pretty and very peaceful. One of the most relaxing campgrounds that we have stayed at on this trip. We only stayed for one night and arrived on a Sunday so we were able to get a great site but reservations start at the end of April and then it becomes more difficult to get a site.
04/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
This campground is right off the Trace near the Park Visitor Center. Good price for electricity, water, sewers, cable and Wi-Fi. It is situated north of the Barnes Crossing Mall, Wal-Mart and many restaurants. The sites are on a hill but quite level. The office is cute with showers, laundry, flowers, swings, bird houses, music in the bathrooms. Cute, clean and the check in was quick and friendly. There are fenced in pastures right next to the campground with horses and cows. Sometimes you can hear the traffic from 78 and the trains at night. There are a number of sites for big rigs and most of the campers here were big rigs. Close to everything in Tupelo to visit – Elvis Presley Birthplace, Tupelo Battlefield, National Fish Hatchery, Tupelo Automobile Museum and the Trace Visitor Center and Indian Village. Enjoyed our two day stay here and would camp here again.
04/2011
rating [ 5/10 ]
This park is just six miles south of Tupelo and the state of MS needs to put some money into it. Tennis courts, bathrooms need to be updated. Most of the sites were level with water and electricity. Checking in was easy and the hostess was very nice. Some long term campers there and many just for a one night stopover traveling the Trace. In the park there is disc golf, fishing and boating. Close to the Elvis Presley Birthplace Park and the other sites in Tupelo to visit. We will not return.
04/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
Our site was almost underwater at this time of year. $ 10 with Golden Age. This is a very nice campground with over half the sites right on the lake. Each site has a table, grill, fire ring, lantern post, water and electric hookups. It is off the Trace down some back roads. Great campground for relaxing, boating, fishing, swimming, hike, biking, playing basketball and volleyball. We only stayed at this campground for one night as we are moving on but definitely would stay longer. If you plan on camping here on a weekend you should get reservations because most of the good sites are reserved for weekends and holidays. There are a number of campsites good for a large camper and a few pull-throughs. At this time of year with the water level so high a few of the sites are closed. We were right on the lake and the water almost reached our fire pit but the majority of the sites were high and dry.
04/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
This state park is right off the Natchez Trace located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains and it is very pretty. The sites goes around a lake but it is one road in and out. The site we had was fine for a 25 foot RV with electricity and water. There are some larger sites for bigger units sites 29-62 at the end of the loop but still on Haynes Lake. Very peaceful looking out over the lake. The park is named for the leader of the Chickasaw nation, Chief Tishomingo. There are massive rock formations and fern-filled crevices here that you can not find anywhere else in MS. Wildflowers line the entrance as well as the trails the Indians used to roam. The park also has a boat launching ramp, cabins, disc golf, nature center, swimming pool in the summer, picnic areas, fields for softball and baseball, a historic cabin, trails for hiking and wildlife viewing. We really enjoyed this campground yet others had told us that they didn’t think we would. I think it was because they had 5th wheels and the road could be a little tight for one pulling something that large. The ranger, host that checked us in was very helpful. They even have a Bear Creek Float Trip from April through October for a 6.25 mile ride down the creek leaving from swinging bridge.
04/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a resort park with a marina, Inn and Conference Center. The lake and river offers fishing, boating, swimming and there is a good restaurant in the Inn with some great deals. There is a golf course across the street that is part of the park and a hiking trail that goes for 2.8 miles around the woods and lake. We arrived during a violent storm in the south with tornadoes, hail, thunder and lightning but we were lucky that it was north of us and south of us and by three in the afternoon the sun came out and the sky was blue. Sites are not that level so we moved on after one night to another campground in the area. Only a few other campers at this time of year.
04/2011
rating [ 5/10 ]
This park is situated where Davy owned and ran along the banks of the Shoal Creek a powder mill, a gristmill and distillery. All three were washed away in floods in 1821 and that is when he decided to move west. At the park there are bike trails and one can ride along Shoal Creek where Davy Crockett worked. In August, there are Davy Crockett Days which is a big festival. This campground has a big lake, boating, fishing, swimming in a pool, fishing, a nature museum, and a great restaurant. Sites are not level and in April only loop 1 and 2 of the second campground were open. It must have been spring break because there were a lot of children here and the bathrooms were not that clean. I had heard so much about TN State Parks but I did not really like this park. The woman that checked us in was wonderful though – pleasant, friendly and very informative.
04/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
We stopped at the Meriwether Lewis campground around noon and boy were we lucky to get a site. This campground is free (one of three on the parkway) and they were paving one of the two loops so campers could only camp in the first 15 sites. I have read before that the “snowbird” Canadians drive up the trace heading home and that they take most of the sites sometimes even doubling up and even save sites for their friends. I can’t believe the NPS allows this! There were only three sites left and fifteen minutes after we were settled five other RVs rolled in. Two of them could not fit in the remaining two sites so they moved on. All sites were taken within fifteen minutes of us getting here yet during the rest of the day others kept on driving through – 10 of the 15 sites were Canadians. There is a big parking lot with restrooms, water and picnic tables that they use for an overflow area. No electricity but it is free and very peaceful! Really enjoyed the drive today once we got on the trace – so relaxing especially since not one other camper or car was heading south everyone else was heading north! This was just a one night stop for us but we would return.
04/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
With Golden Age pass $12, typical COE campground – beautiful sites, water, electricity, table, lantern holder and half the sites right on a lake. There is a boat launching area, beach, fishing and each site even has a table to work on the fish you catch. Bathhouses are clean and small but depending on your site a nice walk away. This is in the Nashville area with lots to do – the Hermitage is only six miles away. We were there during a tornado warning, thunderstorm and high winds and the drainage of the sites was good. 60 sites in all and a laundry facility is available. We would definitely return but there are about seven other COE campgrounds in the Nashville area to try which is hard to believe that there are so many right near a good size city. This COE campground is one of the most popular in the country and it opens around April 1 and closes October 31.
04/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
There is two small loops and many sites are unlevel. There is an 18 hole golf course that surrounds this campground that is part of the park. The club house is a walk away about 2 minutes. You can just walk on over and play. This campground is in Bardstown which has so much to do with many of the distilleries from the Bourbon Trail nearby, civil war sites, historic sites and My Old KY State Home to visit where Stephen Foster stayed when he wrote the song. Campground is small, cute and clean and you can play golf without having to drive out of the campground.
04/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is huge and is laid out in two big circles and primitive sites in the grass near the drive in. Friendly check in and very informative. There is a store, tennis court, basketball courts, volleyball, Olympic-size swimming pool and two huge restrooms. It is right next door to the KY Horse Farm which you can buy a ticket for at a discount at the store. We even rode our bikes over to see it as we bought tickets for our second day here. The farm is a working farm with 115 horses, 80 full time workers, 1,224 acres, barns, indoor and outdoor show rings, museums, films and depending when you go horse shows. One need to check out the calendar because many times the campground is full and the horse park closed for some events like the World Championships. Interesting place!
04/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park seems to be like most KY state parks – very few sites that are level. Even through restrooms were clean, we are finding that most KY parks need to be upgraded and their facilities repaired. On the grounds you can hike, swim in a pool, play miniature golf, visit the museum (excellent), walk the grounds of the battlefield, visit the Inn and even hike the Buffalo Trace!. There were only three other campers here when we arrived. We have also found that especially during the month of April, no one is at the gates in the KY State Parks so anyone can drive around and use the facilities and it is hard to find someone to talk to for information. There are some positives for this – you can change your site whenever you want to and when you do find someone they are always friendly and informative. Beautiful drive to get to this park if you drive the scenic byway by the horse farms to Paris and then pick up 68 which goes right by the park.
04/2011
rating [ 5/10 ]
There are many sites – some on the Kentucky River and the rest in two main loops. Many are not level. Bathrooms are clean but this seems to be an older park with bike riding, bird watching, boating, miniature golf and a half mile hike to the Fort which was very interesting. There are many things to do in season and they do have a public pool for one to use. It’s a good base camp when visiting the Blue Grass Region and the city of Lexington and surrounding horse farms. It is not the best park that we have camped in but we used it for just an overnight and it was very convenient.
04/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
$20 but they give a senior discount. This park is about 10 miles off of I-64 in the eastern part of KY. They have an award winning golf course right next to the campground actually the first sites must find a number of golf balls coming right at them. Kentucky has a number of State Parks with golf courses and they are very reasonable. State Park is nice with swimming, hiking, golf, swimming, boating, volleyball, basketball, hiking, horseshoe pits and picnic areas. Most sites are not level we were in #15 and it was fine for our 25foot Pulse. All sites have water and electricity but some hookups were a good distance away from the actual site. Restrooms were clean and they do have showers.
03/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
Stonewall Jackson State Park Resort and Campground Stonewall Jackson State Park campground (Briar Point Campground) and resort is interesting. The state turned this resort over to a private group to manage and run so the price reflects that. On the medium high side for a campsite but we did have electricity, water, restrooms/showers and a great site overlooking a lake with views of the golf course and Stonewall Lodge. There are 40 RV sites all with water views and 5 walk-in tent sites overlooking the lake. The resort has a marina, an Arnold Palmer Signature Golf Course, spa, hiking, swimming pool, Lakeside Villas, Conference Center, Lodge, restaurants, fitness center, boat tours, and one can bike around the complex. There is a 10% senior citizen discount and WV residents over 62 get a 50% discount from after Labor Day until four days before Memorial Day. Sundays through Wednesdays are cheaper (not much). One can pay $15 extra per day per site for four to use all the boats – paddle, water bikes, canoes, kayaks and bikes, pool, fishing equipment, fitness center, and boat tours. Good deal in the summer! We did not do any of that but we did hike the golf course and walked to the lodge. The golf course is hilly and difficult, since the fairways are narrow; there are many sandpits and the lake winds its way through most of the greens. They have 5 places to tee up at most holes for women and then to expert. Tough course but beautiful! Toured the lodge – really quaint with big fireplaces, indoor-outdoor heated pool, outdoor fire pit and many things to keep you occupied. Spent three nights here with temperatures in the low 30’s to high 40’s mixed in with a snow storm, clouds and a little sun. This was a good stop where we were able to relax, hike and catch up on some sleep. When we arrived there were seven other campers and more were expected for the weekend. We would go back but in the spring, summer or fall. No TV reception here which didn’t please my husband since the Final Four semi-finals were being played on April 2nd so we had to hike to the lodge to watch it in their bar since we don’t tow with our 25ft Fleetwood Pulse.
09/2010
rating [ 9/10 ]
3way, 2way and unserviced on a hill in the woods in a beautiful area of PEI. Our site was level and most of the 3 ways look level. Centrally located and many campers make this their home base and tour the island from here. Costs for 3 way was $32. Bathrooms are clean and they have a swimming pool, wood for sale, washrooms, lodge, trails, fishing pond down the road where bald eagles and Osprey fish, camp store, playground and an office located in their home. Run by the Andrew’s family that are very friendly, nice and will do anything to help you. Nice stay here and would return! The camping cabins are really cute and they have quite a few of them.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a large campground that was remodeled since the last time we were here and has about 304 sites. A large 3-way section, 2-way and unserviced. They charge more if you have a fire pit. Cost NPS fees to get in and site. Since we were there after Labor Day the NPS fees are dropped and the campsite fee is about $12 cheaper. 2-way $26 about $37 during the summer season. We took an unserviced site with water view for $22. There are evening campfires during the summer with skits, songs, and storytelling about the natural and cultural history of PEI. There are restrooms and showers and laundromat. This campground is in an area with more to do and the new parkway will be finished by 2011 with pullouts and bike trails. The campground itself is not right next to the bike trails like Stanhope was but the Cavendish Beach is right there and this beach is much better than at Stanhope. This campground is very nice now with sites in the woods and others in an open area with views of the ocean and sites are a good size. No problems for those with big RV’s to camp here. There are restrooms with showers throughout the campground. We had rain the day we were here so it was tough but we could sneak in walks around the campground and beach and while in our camper we sat looking out at the sea and beach! In the late afternoon the rains stopped and we had a great sunset and everyone was taking pictures. The next morning what a sunrise especially from our site overlooking the beach. One of the best sunsets and sunrises on the island!
08/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
58 3 way sites, 20 2 way sites, and 39 unserviced. Costs around $16. Site 9 right on the cliff. Typical PEI Provincial Park with shelters, fire pits, playgrounds and dumping station. Activities in the summer. The beach here is one of the best in PEI – white sand and it just goes and goes and goes with the red cliffs beside it. Some sites are right on the cliff but all sites have a view of the ocean and some of the beach. All sites are on a hill -the new 3 way sites are level and have gravel but they are way back on top of the hill (views are great, too) the others are on grass but you can get level and only the unserviced sites are a little wooded but the views and the beach are just stunning. I think my favorite campground in PEI but they all have something different so it is hard to choose. Not many campers at this time of year and the campground is closing this weekend. PEI uses students to help run their parks and that is one reason that they close so early plus some nights there are only about 4 campers during the week at some of these Provincial Parks. Our first night here there were over 14 campers for the night and the second night most of them pulled out. We were there for two nights but it is a good place to stay for a few days or just for an overnight when touring PEI. Close to Souris, all the great beaches in the area, the ferry to Madeleine and the East Point Lighthouse. If you are lucky you will see seals swim by like we did and even some whales.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
PEI 46 sites – unserviced, 2 way and 3 way $27.00 but they do offer senior discount This campground seem to have more 3 way sites than 2 way and many of the sites are in the woods but there are about 8 sites facing the sea. There are some beautiful tent sites that are on the cliff with great views. One can see the Wood Islands Ferry, Terminal, Lighthouse and Museum from these sites. The playground is in an open field looking on the sea. Typical PEI park – playground, kitchen shelter, laundromat, wood, trails. This park is used by many who are either going on the ferry to Nova Scotia the next day or they just arrived from the ferry. The park has red cliffs and if one is lucky you can spot cliff swallows burrowing nests along the shore. In the summer they have children programs and supervised swimming. The Rossignol Estate Winery is near by for tours and wine tasting. Nice park rest rooms were clean but need to be updated!
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is on a hillside overlooking the bay and a golf course. The tent sites overlooking the bay are beautiful. This area of PEI was settled by the Irish and Scots so the park in the summer hosts many activities with a Celtic flair. Musical performances by local artists and entertainers are in the open hall situated in the middle of the campground many nights in the summer. One can enjoy the music while looking out over the red cliffs and the bay. If you had a tent site you can just sit in your campsite and enjoy the show. There is a beach where some go clam digging,no swimming allowed but it is a stroll from the campsites. A swimming pool and miniature golf are also within the campground. Next to the campground is the Provincial Park’s 9 hole Belfast Highland Greens golf curse. It is beautiful! This park also hosts the the Annual Highland Games which include dance competitions, bagpipe and fiddle music and typical Irish sporting games. We were there two days before they were closing for the season Sept 12 so only one washroom was available and most of the picnic tables were put away. If you have a self contained unit they will let you come in and stay the night after the closing dates but no services or rest rooms will be available.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Costs with senior discount about $24 for 2 way. Sites 105 unserviced some overlooking the sea. 32 sites 2 way and 33 sites 3 way on grass. This is the most popular and one of the largest parks in western PEI. In the summer they have activities for children and naturalists who give guided walks and talks. The campground has a laundromat, playground and supervised swimming (summer only) on a beautiful beach which is just a quick walk from the campground. There is an old one room school house that is used for children activities and an old lighthouse on the path just before you head to the beach. The red color of the beach and cliffs are stunning. Since we were here after Labor Day there were only about ten tents and campers camping. This park closes about two weeks after Labor Day so always check the opening and closing dates for PEI parks if you plan to camp on the island in the spring or early Fall. The bathrooms could use an updating as we have found in most of these parks but the workers at the parks keep them as clean as possible. We drove from here to the National Park on the north shore near Cavendish!
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground has 20 unserviced sites and 40 sites that are 2 way! The serviced sites are right next to the beach but right next to each other. If you are tenting there is more privacy and larger sites. The bathrooms and showers are clean and there is a laundromat. Most Provincial Parks have laundromats. There is a field to play in, volleyball nets and boardwalks to the beach, along the dunes and over to the lighthouse, inn, gift shop and museum. The lighthouse is an easy walk to get too. There are miles and miles of beaches here but the beaches are rocky and windy. This campground you need reservations for to get serviced sites. It is very popular with those who live on the island and some sites it looked like someone stayed for the summer. We pulled in on Thursday before Labor Day with reservations for two nights and there were only a few sites left that were serviced. I am sure that by tomorrow there will be none but with the hurricane coming it might change some plans for local campers. Most of the Provincial Parks on PEI have pay phones at the check in booth and international phone cards can be purchased at local stores and some gas stations. Everyone is very friendly considering hot hot and humid this week has been.
09/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a small campground right across from the Stanhope Beach area. 109 sites 3-way, 2-way and unserviced. They charge more if you have a fire pit. Cost NPS fees to get in and site. Since we were there after Labor Day the NPS fees are dropped and the campsite fee is about $12 cheaper. 2-way $26 about $37 during the summer season. There are evening campfires during the summer with skits, songs, and storytelling about the natural and cultural history of PEI. There are restrooms and showers and laundromat. These sites except for some of the unserviced and 3 way ones can be very unlevel. The new parkway and bike trail along the parkway is very nice and level for riding. Close to beaches, hikes and local villages. Easy walk to parkway, bike trails and beach. Sites not good for large RV’s.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Linkletter Provincial Park – Summerside, PEI - $24.00 plus that 13 and 15% tax. When we drove in we were met by the nicest young lady who registered us. She drove around helping people and even called for some information for us. One of the best! The park is on the water with a golf course next to it, a beach and about 93 sites – unserviced, water and electricity and 7 full hookups. The sites are on grass and are right on Bedeque Bay very close to Summerside. One can see the sailboats from the city as well as the lighthouse. The Confederation Bridge is in the distance and New Brunswick is just across in the distance. At night one can see the lights from all these areas as well as a beautiful sunset to the west. One of the prettiest around with a lot of the campers taking pictures. We had a site right on the Bay with the cool breezes and one can swim right in the bay at the beach or right off the campground. Great private tenting sites. Just check opening and closing dates because many of the campgrounds close after Labor Day. We would return here – easy drive from the bridge, near the Confedration trail and Summerside! It’s a good stopover and there were sites available during the week but I think on the weekends it must be crowded.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
No services and you must carry your trash out. We stayed in Site 20 right on the lake. This state park is small but very nice. It is about 37 miles east of Augusta right on route 3. There are about ten sites right on the lake and if you have a boat you can tie it right up in front of your site. Restrooms are new like many of the Maine State Parks with individual bathrooms, showers and sink. Nicely done! The State of Maine got a grant to construct these washrooms a couple of years ago and most of their state parks now have really nice ones that are modern. No services here but for an overnight or a week most RV’s can live without it. There is a public picnic area that is very nice with a swimming area next to the campground. Since we were there in September the rates have dropped. We paid as an out of stater $19 but in season it must be close to $25 or higher. It is a good place to stop driving over to Acadia or to stops along the coast!
08/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Brudenell River Provincial Park -95 sites – site 2. Cost around $26 This park is big – the largest one in eastern Prince Edward Island. The campground has the usual things that the provincial parks do in PEI. Laundromat, kitchen shelters, rest rooms, playgrounds, beach or river to swim in etc. There are sites that overlook the water and sites for more privacy in the woods. Some of the unserviced sites are the biggest that I have seen and some do overlook the water. There are unserviced, 2-way and 3 way sites. The restrooms are clean but some are more modern than others. This is a resort with an Inn, and cottages as well as horseback riding, pools at the Inn and campground, recreation center with tons of activities in the summer for adults and children. Paths for walking and bikes and it is close to the Confederation Bike Trail that crosses over the entire island from east to west over 400 km. It also has two 18 hole championship golf courses and a 9 hole executive golf course and tennis courts, horseshoes and a beautiful boxed in grass area for lawn bowling. There is a marina, beach, and interpretative programs. Canoes, kayaking and horseback riding are offered in the park but they are independent groups that provide these services. This park is on the Points East Coastal Drive at the eastern end of PEI but more towards the middle about a 45 minute drive from the ferry.
08/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Gaspereaux, PEI 42 sites unserviced or 2 way. Site 33 facing the Bay. $25.00. This is one of the most popular parks in PEI during the summer months. We camped here the last day it was open in September. They actually had us move since they closed a day earlier than posted. The beach here is beautiful – one of the best in PEI. The causeway that one can drive to go to the lighthouse has the beach on the east side and St. Marys Bay on the other side. Sand dunes, birds and long stretches of shoreline make this a picture taking haven. The campground faces the woods and the Bay and is a short walk, bike ride or drive to the beach. As is typical of the Provincial Parks in PEI they offer electric, water, showers, playground, kitchen shelters, dumping stations and plenty of children activities during July and August. There is also a scenic viewing tower. This park is also the site for the First Nations People annual Pow Wow. It attracts visitors from all over in the summer. The Pow Wow offers native crafts, healing sweat tent, drum bands etc. In the months of July and August reservations would be suggested.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Mill River Provincial Park Total 36 sites unserviced and 2 way and 36 sites 3 way. Site 33. This complex has interpretive programs and evening activities in the summer but after Labor Day is only open for another few weeks as are most PEI parks. Opening and closing dates change every year so one needs to check with the visitor centers or online. We stayed in the 2 way section and since this was Labor Day everyone else left. There were about 10 campers in the three way sections which are set up in the woods in pods. The pods were shaped like triangles with three campsites in each pod. Very unique how it is laid out. The unserviced sites and 2 way sites are in the woods and field. Sites are big! There is a water park and fun park here as well as an 18 hole golf course. Volleyball courts, swimming, canoe/kayaking, marina, racket and tennis courts (extra fees for much of this). Every Provincial Park has a laundromat, pay phone, kitchen shelters, playground and restrooms with showers. This is the only PP in PEI with a campground that is not on the shore even though the river is close. It is the biggest PP in western PEI. This park is right off route 2 which travels through most of PEI in the center of the island.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Jacques Cartier Provincial Park, near Alberton, PEI - $26 for 3 way. Site 6 Total Sites: unserviced 21 and 36 two way and three way. Jacques Cartier built a nice hard gravel 3 way section in their previous overflow area. This was the first year that they had this section and there are problems with the water that they are working on and expect this problem to be fixed by next year. You can use the water but not cook or drink with it at this time so anyone in this section you can get bottled water and jugs from the rangers. We were given a lot of bottles and jugs of water but we also could get the water from the other sites in the tenting area next to us. The rangers are very nice and it seems that there is a ranger or rangers on duty 24 hours a day. This park has a playground, tons of activities and naturalist led nature walks in the summer and a long beautiful beach. It is cooler up here on the bay then on the south coast and firewood may be purchased here for $4.00 for a huge bundle. Again a laundromat, kitchen shelters and dumping station are available as they are in all PEI Provincial Parks. This was a good stop over Labor Day Weekend and to ride out Hurricane Earl here. The rangers checked often driving around and stopping to check to see if the 6 campers that were here were fine before, during and after the storm. Also, all PEI Provincial Parks had a pay phone at the ranger station that those traveling from the USA or other countries can use with a phone card which can be bought in town to call home.
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Green Provincial Park, near Port Hill on the north shore. Sites 56 some full service and about half unserviced. Cost about $26. This park has a river to swim in, Frisbee golf, nature trails, playground and showers. This is an older park and it looks like they put the hookups in after – the electric, water and sewer hookups are not right on site but in the middle with at least four sites sharing. It is kind of strange so that we could not do it in the first site that they gave us and had to move. The woman at the ranger station was very nice at check in and told us we could move if we had too. Since this was during the week – it was not crowded and they do close for the season after Labor Day. We biked around the park and the river is nice for swimming with a shaded picnic area. The unserviced sites along the river are very nice and there are some that an RV could easily back into too. These sites have great views, their own swimming area and are within walking distance of a playground, refuse area, bathroom, showers and fields to play in. There are also nature trails for hiking and the Shipyard Museum to visit. It was a good stopover for one night!
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
$25 for water, electricity and sewers with a discount for Good Sam and a number of organizations. This campground was recommended to us and the park reviews have been good. It is an older park with some permanent sites. The sites are close together but they do have full hookups. There is a pool, a store, and donkeys on the property. Everyone was very nice here but we would only stop again for a quick overnight. Actually, my husband and I feel that if you are in this area that this campground is a good deal. It does need some work but everything works and it is clean, quiet and everyone is nice but they do tend to mind their own business. It is in Wilson, NC which has a nice historic district, shopping area and a super Wal-Mart to stock up on supplies. It is also near Bailey, NC where the Dan Finch Pottery is and that is another reason we wanted to stop.
04/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Cost - $22 with senior discount. Electric and brand new bathrooms in all the loops that we saw. This park is over 3,000 acres in size and next to it sits the Delaware State Forest (12,464 acres) and the Bruce Lake Natural Area so there are a number of summer cottages and villages surrounding this whole area. There are two lakes in this park and they do take reservations and you can camp off season if you are self-contained. Could not find out if any electric is provided in the winter. There are six camping loops that we could find Rhododendro n, Northwoods, and Beechwood in the Lower Lake Area and many sites have electricity. Stayed In Rhododendron area but would stay in the Beechwood area if we return because those sites are paved and nearer to the boat ramp. The Beechwood area is open all year round. Swimming does not very appealing in this area but the park provides a great swimming area just before you reach the park office. The other three areas are the Pines, and Pickerel Point and Deerfield that are closed for most of this year because of construction. They are redesigning the sites and adding electricity – these areas might be the place to stay when done because the point is surrounded by water and swimming. In the park one can hike, fish, bike the roadways, mountain bike trails, horseback trails, five boat launching sites, orienteering courses, picnicking and in the winter snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, ice fishing, and ice skating. There are bears in the park and we had a Bald Ea gle Nest near our campsite. It is a great park and we return!
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Cost $22 with senior discount. I have always heard good things about this campground and it is beautiful. The lake is on 52 acres and all sites are in the woods with the lake nearby. Tuscarora State Park is just above Locust Lake but there is no camping there. These two parks allow boating, fishing, swimming, hiking and both have playgrounds and picnic areas. At Locust Lake there is a nice 1.3 mile paved bike trail that goes around the lake by the boat docks, playgrounds, swimming area, and fishing holes. There is even a compass course that was an eagle scout project for a local boy scout on the lake. Our site was close enough so that we could have walked our kayak down to the water’s edge. One of the campers next to us kept his fishing skiff tied up to a tree there. The bike trail was three steps away from our site and the trail is very enjoyable because it is level and you can always see the lake . The campsites – I have not found the PA parks big rig friendly. Our RV is only 25 feet so we can fit into almost every site but none of these sites were level. How some of the trailers and RV’s fit into some of the sites was amazing. The roads into the parks are not big rig friendly either. The lake is great for fishing and swimming and we would return to this park.
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Cost with senior discount $22. This 3,452 acre campground is on land once owned by the Glatfelter Paper Company. The 1,245 acre Lake Marburg has 26 miles of shoreline for boating, fishing and one small cove for scuba diving. Sailing is one of the favorite things to do on this lake. You can not swim in the lake because the Paper Company and the town of Spring Grove are allowed to use the lake for their own needs so the lake rises and falls drastically. The campground has next to it for a price a public swimming pool sitting on the lake that is over a half an acre so 1000 swimmers can use the pool at the same time. The park also has 6.5 miles of trails for bikes and 19 miles of hiking trails. There are four loops for camping plus a special tenting area on a non paved road. Loop A has no electric and loops B,C and D have a mixture of electric 30 and 50 amps and non electric. We were in loop C and our site was not level but riding around the park there are sites that are level but you can not tell by looking at the sites. Loops B, and most of loop C are in the woods near restrooms and water. While Loop D is in the meadow with open sites and these are better for the larger campers but still not all level. This is a nice campground and we would stay here again the restrooms are older but they were clean and we found the check-in process to be excellent with very friendly volunteers or park workers. Check-in is 3 but we were able to arrive near noon and get in with not any problems. Places to visit – The Heritage Rail Trail in York 21 miles to the Mason Dixon Line in Maryland where one can pick up another 20 mile rail trail the Northern Central Railroad Trail.
05/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
Cost around $30 with electricity. They do have full hookup sites and tenting sites. This park is close to the Manassas Battlefield, the Air and Space Museum at Dulles and a metro to head into DC. They actually suggest that you visit the battlefield on weekends because some of the driving tour crosses and uses route 29 and during the week there is just too much traffic. There are fields everywhere for camping, picnics, soccer, and one can reserve a field for any special event. It is in the woods and very scenic with hiking, biking and horseback riding trails. A water park, disc golf and a shooting center are in the park. This park was a great place to camp to visit this area and the sites are mostly pull throughs on gravel with a pit, picnic table and fire ring. The just electric and tenting sites are in the woods. Our site was near the bathrooms that were clean with hot showers and a laundry room. We enjoyed our stay here and would stay again but hate driving in this area near Interstate 64 and route 29.
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Cost near $35 with taxes and a transaction fee added. Lake Anna State Park used to be the Goodwin Gold Mine reaching it’s peak in the 1880’s. The last gold was found during the 40’s then in 1971 the lake was used to serve as a water coolant for the Virginia Powere’s nuclear plant. It was turned into a state park and opened in 1983. This park has hiking trails, bike trails, fishing, gift shop, lake, swimming, ranger programs, restrooms, showers, and horseback riding trails. There is a visitor center with exhibits on the history of the park. We would return to camp at this park.
05/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
Cost $25 and up adding taxes. This is a working farm with over 1,683 acres along the James River. The park offers swimming in a huge complex, visitor center, store – in season, biking, hiking and also a plantation to visit. There are formal gardens, a Forestry Museum and Farm to tour. The campground has two loops A and B with electricity and water on each site. Four years ago they built the B Loop and it is beautiful. Any size rig can fit into the B Loop – some of the inside sites are just huge! The new restroom in the B Loop is clean, big and also has a laundry room. We did not go into the A Loop restroom but it look like it was also updated. This is a very nice campground. The hosts said that at this time of year they are not full except for most weekends but in the summer they are full most nights so reservations may be needed. The hosts were great in the B Loop – very informative and willing to help. One of the best things about this campground is that it is so close to the free ferry that goes over to Jamestown and Williamsburg for touring. It is also faster to take the free ferry to travel up the interstate above Richmond and head on I-95 north. Nice place, great stay and we would definitely return!
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Park has 74 sites with electric and water and 24 basic sites. Cost with Golden Age about $12. This campground is one of five COE campgrounds on this big reservoir. It is right off route 58. The campground coming from the east is on the left and the huge recreational section of the park is on the right. There are water and electric sites, lakefront sites where you can hook up your boat, restrooms and showers, swimming, hiking, birding and one can bike around the campground and also along route 58. Nice campground and we would definitely stay here again!
05/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
Golden Age Pass $12.50 a night! This is a beautiful campground with over 249 sites in three big areas and many right on the lake. 94 of the sites have water and electricity. They just built three new shower buildings with Chinese money. The park has a dump station, restrooms, showers, interpretive hikes, bike trails, boat dock and swimming in a number of places. The reservoir is a great place to fish! The visitor center at the dam is opened during the week. We enjoy this campground so much that we returned after staying there last spring. Many people come for a week or two week vacations here. There were spots available but not very many in the B Loop, so reservations should be made. Many sites could hold the big campers but read the descriptions of the sites before you book to make sure! There is a bike trail in this campground and this year we rode all of it – nice ride. The trail went over to the A, C and D loops of this campground, which last year we did not even know they existed. Some beautiful sites in the A & C loop and many with electric and water. There are also many sites right on the water for those who don’t want any hookups. The best beach and brand new shower house are in the C loop also. Great campground and can’t believe all the recreational facilities that are on this reservoir!
05/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
Electric sites $17 and non $12 but with the pass its half price. These sites are in one big loop with some sites on the river. There are a number of sites with electricity but none near the river. Most sites offer some privacy among the trees and most are quite large. There is a restroom that was built in the last ten years with hot showers and another one that needs some work. We had problems finding water near out site but there was plenty available near the non-electric sites. Each site has a grill, lamp post and picnic table. The main rest room and the entrance of the park are quite attractive with palm trees and flowers laid out in a pleasing arrangement. A one mile bike trail goes around the campground but that also needs some work on it – we did not even take it and we ride our bikes everywhere! A stairway leads to a sand beach but after being on the outer banks there is no comparison. We have stayed in this forest before but at the other National Forest site Cedar Point and found we liked that campground so much better than this one. It is all right for one night and everyone we met was very nice! In the morning the campground was so peaceful especially with all the birds chirping away. There are two host sites if anyone had any problems or questions to be answered.
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground has over 130 sites in four loops along the dunes. There are no hookups but they have modern bathrooms and outside cold showers. Pretty campground but not much privacy. Some of the people were able to pitch their tents under the undergrowth for protection. A quick walk over a dune to the big, beautiful beach. The closest National Park Campground in the outer banks to the beach. Very peaceful campground but we did have some jerk keep his truck running most of the night with his headlights on our site and the one next to us. The Pleasure Way next to us from Quebec left around 1:30 am and found another site in the campground. A nice bike trail 3 miles into the village and the village has anything one would want – markets, restaurants, visitor centers, docks and shops. We would definitely stay here again and you can find a spot most nights except in the summer the holiday weeks. One guide told us why anyone wants to camp here in the summer is amazing because it is hot and the big swamp bugs come out in force to bite you. You can make reservations for the campground and with a pass it is only $12 a night! Great little island and especially visiting it during the spring and fall!
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Cost with pass $10 a night. Out site P29 near a boardwalk to the beach and the bathrooms. There are at least 127 sites at this campground and it fills up Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends but most other times you can get a site. There are no reservations here only first come first serve. This is a very pretty campground that is really spread out among the dunes with ground coverage for privacy. No hot showers but there are cold and the bathrooms are adequate and there are quite a few of them spread throughout the campground. The sites on the outer loop up on the hill are stunning – you can see the Ocean in the distance from them but we still preferred the sites near the boardwalk. This campground is in driving distance of Cape Hatteras Visitor Center, Lighthouse and Museum and the walking ranger talks and hikes through that area. It is also near the village of Hatteras where you catch a free ferry to Ocracoke Island. We loved our two night stay here even though it was windy but where is it not windy on the Outer Banks! There is another NP campground in the area Cape Point but it does not open until the weekend before Memorial Weekend. We definitely would return to this campground – it’s stunning!
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Golden Age Pass $10. This campground has three loops. One is for tents and the other two for anyone including some big RV’s. There are no hookups and the site is paved a little but the rest grass. Sand dunes are all around this campground and one must hike over the dune to reach the beach but it is not far or you can drive your four wheel drive vehicle out using the park road. The bathrooms are clean and presentable. No hot showers just cold showers in a little building to get the salt and sand off you. The rangers are very nice and the campground fills up on most weekends in the summer but not during the week. The sites are not reserve able! Nice stay and we would come back. Bring water though because I don’t know if you would want to drink it unless you boiled it but that was just one persons opinion!
05/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
In the old fishing village of Wanchese, NC is the Campground Refuge on Roanoke Island which overlooks a private pond. The campground offers full hookup sites and offers overnight sites that are limited but most sites are becoming yearly sites. There are boardwalks to walk out on, swimming near by and places to kayak and canoe. It is a nice campground with many year round rentals. During the week, there were about 5 over nighters and only about five of the rental sites filled. It must fill up during the weekends. This campground was very quiet, clean and friendly. The walks out into the refuge were very nice and it was great having the pond behind our site. The pool was closed when we were there. We met one man who said the fishing was the best from this pond and you didn’t need a license to fish. Restaurants can be found in Wanchese, as well as over the bridge on the outer banks. The woman who checked us in was very nice and gave us a lot of information about what to do in the area. We would definitely camp here again if in the outer bank region!
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Cost $35 plus with water and electric. This campground used to be called Seashore State Park, but in the 1990’s the name was changed to First Landing State Park because this is where the British landed before they started the Jamestown settlement. The park was created by the CCC and is located on the bay. They have sites for all size campers but on dirt and grass with two way hookups. The beach is close and some sites do have a view. The state really needs to put some money into this park especially fixing up the sites. You can boat, bike, swim, attend ranger talks and walks, and hike on a number of trails. There are over 19 miles of trails and some are for hiking, biking and exercising with special equipment put along the trails. There is a visitor center. I would strongly urge one to get reservations here because it was packed when we were there. You can not request a specific site only site size, so when you arrive it is first come first serve even with reservations. There is a lot to do around this area with Virginia Beach, Norfolk and Newport News all in the area. Interesting park!
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
$28 for an out of state camper depending if you get the senior or golden age discount. This campground is in the pines with over 142 sites on the north shore of Trap Pond. The whole park is huge with public areas for group and family get together, volleyball courts, hiking, biking, boating and places for just sitting and enjoying the water fall and geese. There are cabins and yurts for rent some facing the water and a great tenting site. There are two walk in tent sites on an island for a group or family that was beautiful and so private with areas to put in a kayak or canoe. Four loops are for tent and RV camping with water and electricity under the pines. One loop D has pull through sites but all the sites are on pine needles not paved spots. We enjoy that especially with the nice smell of the pine trees. The ranger check-in cabin was a log cabin with a store in it – very cute. The rangers were very nice and helpful. We would definitely come back to camp here.
05/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
$26 with a golden age pass for an out of state camper. We have heard good things about this campground which is open year round. All the 59 sites are located in the woods with most of them having water and electricity. There are about six loops for RV’s and tents are welcomed not only in those loops but there is a loop just for tents. The bathroom shower sections needed to be updated for more privacy. Our site was in walking distance to a big beautiful pond where one can fish, boat or hikes the many trails that go around the pond. The state park is huge with separate areas for day use, boating and hiking as well as a huge playground area. There are horseshoe pits, volleyball courts, disc golf, baseball fields and a canoe trail. You can not swim here – I think Delaware stopped all swimming at their state parks because of law suits because about fifteen years ago you were allowed to swim in most of them. We enjoyed our one night stay at this campground; the host came around and gave us a lot of information about what to do here. He was very pleasant.
09/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Peaks-Kenny State Park is in between Greenville and Bangor, Maine. There are about 56 sites in two loops a walk away from Sebec Lake. The sites are nice and good size and there is a central washroom with bathrooms, showers and a dish-washing area. The land was donated by the Mr. Peaks in the memory of his parents and one sister that was married named Peaks-Kenny. The walk down to the lake is about 5 minutes and there is a huge shaded picnic area on the beach. A playground, boating area and swimming area are all in this area. The lake looks out to the mountains up north and the views are outstanding. Beautiful lake. We arrived around 11 in the morning and from Sept 20 to 23 it is self-registration so we took our site and put our money in an envelope into the spot for it. We were one of two campers in the park at that time but as the day wore on more tenter's came in. Just a reminder the Maine State Parks do take reservations now for the summer months and after the mid of September reservations are no longer taken and the price drops too. Maine State Parks have really increased their cost for a night’s stay for an out of stater at their parks but with the drop in price it cost us $19.26 including tax for a night and that is without services. Nice stay – we stayed here about 19 years ago during the summer with our three children and it was quite crowded so this stay was so quiet – quite a change.
09/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Rangeley Lake State Park is located in the western part of the state on the Rangeley Scenic Byway. The Appalachian Trail crosses near the park in two spots. Beautiful drive up 17 or 4 to get to the park. Many small lakes in the region when driving these routes. We had never camped in this campground before – one of the most popular state parks in Maine. Reservations are a must in the summer and the park closes down at the end of September, but one should check the closing dates of all Maine State Parks because they seem to change yearly. After Sept 13th this year no reservations were taken for the Maine State Parks and the price drops. It’s $10 then for a Maine resident and almost $20 for an out of stater. No hookups of any kind but the sites are mostly private, some on the water with a short walk to the lake where you can put in a canoe or kayak. Only 50 sites, but there are three restrooms with showers. One of the restrooms is brand new with individual family showers with toilets that are huge. Nice park and only about 12 campers a night during the week in September with more coming in on the weekend. There is a playground area, swimming area, ball area and boat dock in the park as well as hiking trails all over the area. Float planes are popular up here flying in on the lake and fisherman are all over the place. Kayaking on the lake was beautiful looking up at the mountains and the sunsets. This park is on a huge canoe trail that goes all the way up to Fort Kent over 300 miles long. Some kayaks pull up for the night in the campground and then just pack up and leave first thing in the morning. The lake is known for its landlocked salmon and trout fishing but there are areas just for “catch and release”. In the morning we heard the moose calls come across the lake and from the nearby woods. There are also coyotes, bear, deer, birds, and plenty of other animals that you might find in the north woods. A very peaceful campground with campgfires going every night. It did get down to 34 degrees one night but it was not bad the other days have been in the 60’s. We enjoyed our drive up to here and have been biking, kayaking, reading and enjoying walks and meeting other campers. The drive around the lake is one of four Maine “must-see” scenic drives and the little towns are cute and ski towns for Saddleback and Sugarloaf mountains. At night our campfires have felt nice and warm and the stars at night – it almost feels like you can put your hand out and touch them. So clear and bright. Great place to camp and we had cell service the whole time!
09/2009
rating [ 10/10 ]
This campground started in 2000 on what was once 19 acres of farmland so that is why all the street names are named after vegetables that were grown on the farm. Shaded and open sites- 75 of them-but it sure looks like there were more. The campground was about 80% full the night we stayed here in mid September. It cost us $28 with a Good Sam discount and a $1.00 for internet. The campground is not for tenters mostly for RV’s with showers, laundry facilities, fax machine, internet, electric, water, sewer, cable, dump station. The small restaurant next to the campground (Hermon Family Restaurant) just recently opened up again with home cooked meals which was very good. There are a number of snowbirds that stay here for the summer months from Texas and Florida and quite a few Canadians. Bangor is the center of the Down East and campers do use this as a base to travel to a variety of different tourist sites. Check-in was friendly, fast and easy, and what I really liked is that they have typed out directions on small strips of paper on a board to everything that you can take. Good stay and we stopped here because of recommendations from another camper that we met and also park reviews. Since we had been in the north woods of Maine for two weeks without utilities we appreciated a night with it. Great for a lengthy stay or a one night just passing through stay. Open May 1 – October 15.
09/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Mt. Blue State Park in Weld, Maine is in the western part of the state with mountains around it. The drive is interesting to get there, but follow the signs as well as a GPS. This is the third time we have camped here, but have not been back in over ten years. The camping sites are located in three loops all within a short hike to Webb Lake where one can boat, fish, swim, picnic and hike. There are 136 campsites – some are huge in loop two and three, but one should check out their site for low hanging branches, but there are sites for big rigs. The roads around the loops are small and narrow though. Since it was a Sunday night and in September we were able grab a host site right next to their new bathroom and shower complex. The pit toilets are still around the campground, but this new complex is very nice and clean. There is no electric or water hookups, but most of the sites are quite private. Plenty of hiking trails, and the lake is beautiful! It is a good stopover and a quiet place to spend a night or two when traveling. Others like to come up for a week or two during the summer for the cool nights, and many come to see the fall colors in early and late fall. They do take reservations now for the summer months, and after the middle of September reservations are no longer taken, and the price drops, too. Maine State Parks have really increased their cost for a night’s stay at their parks, but with the drop in price it cost us $18 plus $1.26 tax for a night and that is without services.
09/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
If you don’t have reservations for Blackwoods it is hard to get in with an RV. They only have about 40 RV sites but plenty of tent sites. Actually an RV 25feet and under could fit into many of the tent sites but in the last ten years they are not doing that. Blackwoods is near the parkway and Bar Harbor. There are hikes, walks, ranger talks out of the campground. The bathrooms and many of the sites have been updated in the last five years but still no showers but showers can be found outside the park entrance for a fee, open 24 hours. This campground is still one of our favorites. The trees and the sound of the waves on the rocks at night lull you to sleep. There is a short walk down to the cliffs and park road which is beautiful. One can ride bikes through the campground and take them on the carriage roads. LLBean provides free shuttles from the campground to the parkway, Jordan’s Pond, Bar Harbor and will drop you off even with your bikes to hikes and walks around the National Park if the bus is going that way. Rangers are nice but don’t take the time with you as the Seawall Rangers do because they are so busy. Blackwoods is open all year with limited services. Bar Harbor is expanding with more restaurants especially since now all these cruise ships are in the harbor. One day there were three ships in and one of them was the maiden voyage of the new Queen Victoria from England. Interesting people from the ships and so many campers traveling from all over the country staying in the campground.
09/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
Cost was $10 with golden age. We have never before stayed at this campground in Acadia National Park in Southwest Harbor. This campground is a first come first serve campground and closes September 30. It is in the peaceful area of Acadia National Park and the reason we had never stayed there before is that there is always a waiting line to get in but since we had reservations for Blackwoods the next day we thought we would take a chance that it would not be crowded in September five nights before it closed. We loved the campground. There are about 31 RV sites in loop C which was built just for RV’s. New bathrooms but no showers but they can be found outside the park for a fee. It is a walk away or quick bike ride away from the seawall in a beautiful area. Many of the campers there could not get into Blackwoods campground so came here and decided they would stay because they loved it. Hiking, biking, kayaking and a quick ride to Echo Lake where there is swimming. To get over to the parkway road and Bar Harbor it is about 30 minutes away. The night we were there they were giving away free fire wood because it was the end of the season. Nice campground with Ranger talks and walks and some of the friendliest rangers who will give you complete information about the park, free shuttles, hikes etc. This campground is not as busy in the fall as Blackwoods so the rangers have more time for you! Some campers stopped at the local grocery store in Southwest Harbor where they will steam lobsters for you on the go – our camping neighbors had lobster every night!
09/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground is conveniently located off I-95 on Union Street. There are 52 shaded and sunny sites with some pull through’s 30 & 50 amp service, water, electric, sewer, dump station, restroom, showers, children s play area, rec hall, large pool, camp store, lending library. Good for touring the Maine “Down East” areas and Bangor itself. Campfires are allowed. This campground is convenient to everything in Bangor – it is a small campground with some seasonal sites. Nice playground and pool for children and easy and friendly check-in. We passed Stephen King’s house with his black gates and birds on top – interesting. Went to the new super Walmart in Bangor for food shopping and also went downtown Bangor to the park where the huge Paul Bunyan Statue is. We have seen this statue over the years and both of us believe that they must have painted it again within the past year.
05/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
Dingmans Ferry Campground – Delaware Water Gap (NPS) 133 rustic campsites – Site 84 No hookups at all but there is hot water and showers. Tent sites by the river $37/ tent or RV sites in the woods $32. Golden Age pass discount since this is a NPS campground. It seems expensive for a NPS campsite. Reservations can be made by calling the campgrounds toll free number. Not really big rig friendly! This is an interesting campground in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area located at Dingmans Ferry in PA. Sites are private along the Delaware river (tents only) or in the woods. The night we were there during the week in May only two other campers were there. The day was rainy off and on but the forest is so dense that you would not know it was raining. It can be very dark at night. There are hiking trails, horseshoes, volleyball and a boat ramp in the campground. There are a few visitor centers and a number of hikes to waterfalls in the Recreational Area and also on the other side of the Delaware River in NJ. The Appalachian Trail goes through the park and there are shuttles to bring you to one hut and pick up five miles later at another hut. There are also canoe trails and trips from one day to more than four offered for a price. It is in a beautiful area in the Pocomo section of PA and it is a resort area. The camp store opens in the morning and offers free coffee on some days at 8.
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Gettysburg, Artillery Ridge Campground – I think it is expensive but it has tons of activities and it was Memorial Weekend. Artillery Ridge Campground located less than half a mile from the battlefield is quite different than the type of campgrounds we usually camp at. They have tons of sites and everyone is on top of everyone else. It was Memorial Weekend and we had booked four days. There are some good points about the park – horseback rides onto the battlefield, swimming pool, playgrounds, hookups, laundry, Wi-Fi hotspot, covered horse stalls to bring your own horse, cabins. Very friendly at check in. Bathrooms were ok! We are used to dry camping in the woods and having campsites with lots of room and privacy so this was quite a change from what we have been camping at, but we knew before we came it was going to be crowded. I will say even with the activities they had that weekend and all the people it was not noisy at night, and our neighbors were very considerate and polite. We camped here to ride our bikes to the battlefield and visitor center which we did. Also stopped at Boyds Bear which is in the Gettysburg area – what an amazing store. We stayed an extra day before heading back home and what a difference this campground is after many campers went home on Memorial Day. It was not bumper to bumper and was quite enjoyable! We would go back!
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is located in northwest Maryland, and the Appalachian Mountains pass through the park. It has a freshwater lake that was manmade, boating and fishing. They claim that the lake is the nicest in the area. There are trails in the park for hiking. Electric hookups are available in the just the C loop. The loops are hilly but you can get your RV level. Nice sites and the bathrooms are ok. The swimming area is nice but a good hike away from the camping loops. Nice rangers and workers at the entrance station. There is a visitor center in the park with exhibits about the area. Nice stay
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Cost with Golden Age $7.50 – no hookups at all! We took site 20, which was a small pullthrough looking out over the mountain. Another National Park Service campground on Skyline Drive. This campground has only 31 sites and a huge picnic area. It is on the Appalachian Trail so that it is very popular with those hiking the trail and other trails on the Drive. All sites were taken for the weekend and most of the campers moved out on Sunday especially after a violent thunderstorm Saturday night. We have a 25 foot RV and could fit in most sites but anything bigger it would be a tough fit. Only two pull throughs. Very popular campground and also with the bears. Three bears were in the campground the night before we pulled in. Beautiful drive getting to the park coming from the north or south.
05/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a big KOA right next to the National Historic District of Harpers Ferry. It has full hookups, a lot of activities, There are 280 sites some open and others in the woods with shade, 42 Kabins, 300 person conference center, indoor basketball court, game room, movie theater, pizzeria, large heated pool, wading pool. It is near the Appalachian Trail and the C&O canal and the Harpers Ferry Historic Park. Everyone was very friendly when we checked in. It is a KOA so we found it expensive but you have to know that before you check in. Nice stay just before Memorial Weekend so very quiet.
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is one of the four main ones in Shenandoah National Park and the closest one to the north entrance. The Appalachian Trail surrounds it and there are many hikes in the area to take and many to some great waterfalls. It has a nice layout and opens up around May 15, so when we were there the deer stroll into the park with no fear of humans. Eight bear were spotted around the area of the campground, and driving here bobcat jetted across in front of us and then stared as we went by. 25% of the sites can be reserved and the others are first come first serve. It was empty on the weekday we were there in May but on the weekends it is usually full. Hiking, observing nature and wildlife and driving the Skyline Drive are the favorite things to do. The day we were here was sunny and clear.
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is in the middle of the Skyline Drive with a visitor center,amphitheater, laundry, trails, showers, ranger talks and walks. It is a nice campground with the Appalachian Trail just steps away. Plenty of deer walking throughout the campground and some beer sightings as well. Visitor Center had a few films to watch, exhibits and a big meadow to lookout on and explore. At night the lights from the towns in the valley glisten down below. Nice campground! The Virgina Piedmont is to the east and the Shenandoah Valley to the west. If you haven’t driven the Skyline Drive or camped here you definitely should. When the days are sunny and clear like it was the views are outstanding and there are so many hikes one can choose.
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
No hookups at all but there are restrooms and water and a campstore with laundry and showers. This campground is one of four on the Skyline drive in Shenandoah National Park. There is also another one that is for groups only. You can make reservations here for about 30 of the sites. Most of the sites are pull through and good size even for the largest campers, but there are a number of sites that are not level. Real nice tent sites. We moved from reserve site to a non reserve site only because it was more level, but actually this site faces west so we were able to look at the views looking down on the valley, and at night one can see the lights of the towns in the distance. Great views! The Appalachian Trail goes right around this campground so easy to get on to go hiking either way. We arrived on opening day May 15 a Friday and it was quite interesting within 6 hours most of the sites in the campground were taken. Lots of deer roaming through the woods and through your sites. Very nice campground!
05/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is situated on the west side of the Blue Ridge and one can find it by taking a mile post 16 route 814 much easier drive than the 664 off the mountain. This is known as the jewel of the Blue Ridge because of its beauty, with the mountains around it, and located on the shores of a 25 acre spring fed lake. It was built by the CCC, and so some of the buildings are of the typical logs and natural stone. There are four loops two for tents and two for RV’s and bigger rigs. In all there are 65 sites and 30 with electricity. All sites are first come first serve so even during midweek of May there were only about 3 sites left after we got there. It is one of the most popular campgrounds of the forest service. The upper lake is good for fishing and hikes around and the lower lake has a nice swimming area, fishing pier, park benches and a few hiking trails that go around it. They had a water shortage when we were there so the showers were not working. Very peaceful campground and so much beauty!
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is in Appomattox and only 12 miles away from Appomattox Court House Historic Site. The park is huge with over 20,000 acres of National Forest surrounding it and that is why you can’t get cell phone service at this park. It is a pretty park, but it is not big rig friendly. We camped here with a RV just 25 feet and we could fit in about half the sites, but many are not level and a big rig would have problems driving around some of the campground roads. We stopped for just one night and you did not need reservations midweek even if you wanted one of their water and electric sites. The manager of the park stopped to talk to us as he was checking on the campers later in the evening and told us that they are quite busy on weekends and that they are developing a big rig friendly campground just up the road from this one. The new park will only have about 10 -20 campsites for big rigs with 3 way hookups and a new bathhouse. He was very friendly and informative. There are Interpretive Events happening every Sat night in this park and on Memorial Weekend they have a big campfire with stories on Friday night, canoe tour and owl call on Sat where they go out in the canoes and call to the owls at night to fly over, and finally on Sunday night a Civil War slide show plus guided hikes and educational programs throughout the weekend. The bathrooms are old but very clean and it was peaceful. There are hiking trails right from the campground down to the lake and around the lake which are very nice. The lake is huge over 150 acres. Just down the road (.1) there is a swimming beach, boat dock, playground and off shore fishing. Gasoline power boats are not allowed on the lake. The tricky part is getting into the campground. We saw signs but the drive in is about 5 miles going up and going down There are trails for horses as well as bike trails and during the weekends and in the summer there are historical and educational programs.
05/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
A campground that only has full hookups/ Wi-Fi/ and cable. The Wi-Fi is a good strong signal from every site. On the campground map it shows over 65 sites, but walking around they are working on putting some new sites in, and now there are close to 90 sites or more. They are have big plans for this campground and expect to add a swimming pool, playgrounds, store, campfire pits and much more. Right now there are no tables at each site but the bathroom was clean and there are two catch and release ponds.. The sites are spread out and there is no privacy but it is still quite peaceful. You can look out towards the Blue Ridge Mountains in the distance but you do hear the interstate near by. The campground sits on the former farm and homeplace for Eng and Chang Bunker (the famous Siamese twins) and their descendents. They are buried at the little white church near by and the downtown regional museum tells the history of their story. The campground is easy to get to and very close to all sorts of restaurants, Wal-Mart, and any other stores or gas stations that you might need. Very interesting. Other places to visit are all the wineries in the area (29 of them) especially the Shelton Winery (one of the most beautiful wineries we have seen), the regional museum and the largest open granite pit in the world. The visitor center downtown has maps and there is a drive through tour where you can see these sites as wells as the Bed and Breakfast which was Andy’s homeplace. There is even a winery right downtown! The Blue Ridge Mountains are close by as well as a couple of state parks and other historic sites to visit like the JEB Stuart birthplace. Lots to do and visit in the area. RV friendly, a number of free parking lots around town but the best place for a large RV is the post office parking lot. We were in a tornado watch again and had thunderstorms around midnight. Traveling in the middle of NC and western part in the months of April and May we have been told to expect this but as much as we have loved NC, I think visiting the area would be safer during other times of the year.
05/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Pisgah National Forest – Lake Powhatan Campground Asheville,NC – Friday, Saturday & Sunday May 1,2,3, Site 93 Hardtimes Loop/ $20 but add on if 3 way hookup which you can only get if host sites are not filled. Golden Age Pass applies so take 50% off just the base fee. The directions are easy to follow to this National Forest Campground but some of the roads are narrow off of highway 191. This park has four big loops or areas and they are all on hills – the whole park is hilly. There is a beach for swimming, showers in some loops, dump station and many trailheads in the park for hiking. If you are in excellent shape and in your twenties you can bike all around but it is very difficult for someone who is not! It is on Highway 191 right off of I-26 just before you enter Asheville with many shopping malls and stores around. It is right next to an entrance to the Blue Ridge parkway and within three miles of the Folk Art Center and the Destination Center – two good places to visit on the parkway. The North Carolina Arboretum back entrance is on the road to the campground. Dogwood Trees were all in bloom so it was very pretty driving in. It is also close to the Biltmore Estate for visiting and an easy trip downtown but Asheville is a city and the traffic is heavy especially on Fridays and Saturdays. The site we had was hard to get into but there are many that are easy. All the hosts that we met were very nice, friendly and informative. We would stay here again. There is so much to see in Asheville and on the Blue Ridge that you can not do it all in just three days!
05/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
W. Kerr Scott Dam and Reservoir – Bandits Roost Campground – COE Wilkesboro, NC – May 6 & 7 (Wednesday/Thursday) Cost with Golden Age with electric and water $10 – 100 sites – our site 26A. This is another great COE campground but it is only one of over three on this lake. There are some campsites on the lake and others in the woods. There is a tenting only area and there are areas without water and electricity. The section we were in the A loop we had campers on each side of us but we could look out to the lake on both ends. Bandits Roost our campground is on the south side of W Kerr Scott Reservoir in the Yadkin River Valley. There are bike and hiking trails, boating, fishing, water skiing and swimming. Hunting is allowed in season. There is a playground, basketball court, amphitheater and launching ramps for boats, canoes and kayaks. The people who work here are nice and it is a nice campground. There is one bathroom and shower house per loop so your site could be a good distance walking to them. We stayed here for two nights, one with thunderstorms and rain and the next a bright, sunny day!
05/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
Blue Ridge Parkway – Linville Falls Campground (NPS) Linville Falls on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina. Monday and Tuesday May 4 & 5. Site 6 in a campground with 70 sites. Tent sites are on the river and very pretty. The cost was $16 but $8 with golden age. This campground does not have any hookups but the bathrooms are clean. It is near the Linville River and the visitor center is just down the road where there are easy, moderate and difficult hikes to the higher falls, middle falls and lower falls. It was raining in spurts when we went and certain sections of the hikes were slippery with the mud and wet rocks. Beautiful falls! Nice campground and because most of the campers pulling in were traveling down the parkway a very diverse group. We met couples from Germany, Hawaii, Florida etc. Many were on long trips, a month, six months and the couple from Hawaii have been traveling for over two years touring the mainland USA. Interesting to talk to them since everyone seems to walk around the campground at night before turning in and until the rain soaks you. We camped here for two nights in the beginning of May, and Linville Falls was the only campground open on the Parkway in North Carolina. All the others open up around May 15 except campers pulling in were saying that Otter River Campground was open in Virgina.
04/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
Badin Lake campground is in Uwharrie National Forest; and has 35 sites (We had site #13.) This is one of two campgrounds in the Uwharrie National Forest. The other one (Arrowhead) has some electric sites but it is not next to the lake. This campground is next to the lake but it does not have electricity and it has only 34 sites. Reservations are needed for the weekends even the first weekend in May. It is a beautiful campground overlooking the lake. Open year round. Each site has a picnic table, grill, lantern post and tent pad. There are toilets and showers and the host kept them really clean. Fee $12. Get good directions before you drive in – if you take the road after the BP gas station on route 109 you will save yourself about three miles of traveling on gravel roads – even taking this road you will still have a mile or two of gravel to take and potholes. There were sites for big rigs but the drive in is slow and hard for large RV”s and you wonder if you will be the only ones there. There are two loops to this campground and when we pulled in about the half the sites were taken and all were reserved for the weekend. It was like all of a sudden there was civilization. If your site is on the water you can launch your kayak or fish off the banks. There are a few boat docks in the forest, hiking trails, bike trails and picnic areas. It is a beautiful forest and the host was excellent – helped us back in and gave us maps of the area and other information that we needed. This campground is about an hour away from Seagrove with over 100 pottery shops and the NC Pottery Center and Museum considered the top pottery village in the USA. Very interesting!
04/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is one of three in the Jordan Lake State Recreation Area that has RV camping (Parkers Creek and Crosswinds), there is another for RV groups only Vista Point and one area just for tents New Hope Overlook. We did not have reservations and at this time of year did not need them but at this time they only accepted reservations for 7 days or more. The ranger came around to the site to collect the money and at this time he told us that Crosswinds and Poplar Point are going on a state reservations system beginning April 22 for dates July on. Now you can make reservations for one night or up to 14 and the website is www.ncparks.gov/reservations.php There are a lot of sites on the water and we selected one in the woods looking out over the water so that we could put the kayak in right from our site. Nice site. All sites have a table, fire ring, and alot have water and electricity. There is a boat dock so that motor boats can be put in and then brought over to your campsite if it is on the water. A nice beach area on Jordan Lake which is huge. The cleanest and nicest smelling bathrooms I have seen. We really enjoyed our one night stay here the weather was great, the kayaking really good with calm water going around many inlets and coves, nice bike ride over hills and dales and friendly hosts and other campers.
04/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
Many permanent but each year, more are for overnight. Many stay in this area for a week or more. This campground only has full hookups and the cost $29 includes internet connection and cable TV connection with many, many stations. It is out in the farm area of Chapel Hill and it is very peaceful. At one dip in the road before you reach the campground road, Senator John Edwards multi-million dollar house is set back but all you can see is the road and a gate, but those here said it is huge with its own gym. There is nothing at the campground but a playground. No restrooms or showers! It is a nice place and considered the best camping near the Chapel Hill and UNC and Duke. Call for reservations and they warn you to call when you are about an hour away from coming to the campground so that someone is at the office and your site is ready. So much construction around Duke and neither university is RV friendly at all. So we drove around and it was interesting but were not able to get out and bike or walk around. I don’t know if I would want to have biked because UNC is built on rolling hills. Nice area though and I think some people must camp here when they are visiting the medical units of both universities. We would definitely camp here again but we would rent a car. Chapel Hill and Durham, the research triangle, are big cities now with 3 to 6 lane traffic patterns. Anything bigger than a car you have a hard time getting around and no place at all to park. Actually all parking is pay now and whatever visitor parking there is, it is taken by 8 in the morning. You can pay ahead of time (like three days ahead) for a reservation to park as a visitor at UNC but the sites we saw were again only for cars. The Duke gardens (Sara Duke gardens of 55 acres, a living museum of design, plant and horticulture) and chapel (a 50 bell carillon, with bells ranging in weight from 10 to 11,200 pounds, a Flentrop Organ -in the center of the campus) and the UNC museum (Carolina Basketball History), bell tower and planetarium (a NASA training ground for many space missions) are must visits but there are so many other interesting places to visit depending on your interests.
04/2009
rating [ 10/10 ]
Sites 139 – Site 88 B Loop – Cost with golden age $10 This is a big reservoir with over 50,000 water acres which stretches between the VA and NC state line. There is a visitor center next to the North Bend Campground which is close to Snow Hill off of I85. Actually there are 5 COE campgrounds and 2 or 3 state campgrounds on this reservoir, but not all of them have sites with electricity and water. North Bend has many sites with electricity plus showers, interpretive trail, swimming, boating, and a playground. It is a beautiful campground with some outstanding non electric sites 115-124 looking out over the reservoir and a constant cooling breeze. It also has some great electric sites looking out over the reservoir near the beach area and where you can put in canoes or kayaks. Our site was like being in heaven it had plenty of shade, right near the beach with a great view. It was 94 outside and we did not have to put on the air conditioner at all amazing. We would definitely come back here and spend a week here great place. One of the most relaxing and enjoyable campgrounds we have ever camped at.
04/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
7,625 acres with two lakes, but not for swimming. 20 miles south from Richmond. This campground will take a reservation, but it is a Virginia State Park and it is not site specific. You drive around and select your own site. This park has an amphitheater, boat launch area, camp store, fishing, hiking, bridle and bike trails, laundromat, museum, nature center, and playground. The bike ride is not easy as there are a lot of hills, dirt, ruts more for mountain bikes. The boat area and swimming pool are at least a 20 min hike away from the camping. Some sites have no shade, but many do, and there are a number of sites that are pull-throughs for big units. Each site has a table, lantern holder and fire grate. This park is easy to get to off of I95 and there are stores and gas stations on the way to the park. It is huge and a good stopover for one night or more. Lots of battlefields and history surround the area of Richmond (the state capital)
04/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
Sites some with electricity and water $31 plus tax, Loops A through F, our site 114 D Loop with a 25 ft RV. This is a huge county park run by Newport News with easy off and on I-64 at exit 250-B. There are campground signs to direct you but make sure you take Campground Drive not the roads that go to the visitor center and the rest of the park. This park is on a reservoir with boating, hiking, disc golf, archery, fishing, playgrounds, hot showers, laundry, and fire pits. Many sites are not level and would not take a RV over 25 feet but there are some sites that are very level where a big camper or trailer would fit so if you make reservations ask them for a site that would fit whatever your camping in. Easy drive to the Yorktown National Battlefield and it’s visitor center. Biking trails (5 miles) around the park and it also connects to the Yorktown Historic Battlefield at the George Washington Headquarters encampment where you can continue to bike on the park roads. This is a beautiful ride especially on a nice day much nicer than driving your car around the battlefield. The showers were clean and hot. The only negatives are that it is close to I-64 and train tracks so that you can hear the trucks at night and sometimes the trains. We had a site overlooking the reservoir and it was not crowded during the week actually we were the only ones in our D loop so it was very peaceful with a beautiful sunset. If you have a car you can take the Historic Parkway from Yorktown right into Williamsburg or take I-64.
04/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
We were in the Deer Run Section (electric sites) site 118. Cost with senior discount Sun through Thursday $15. Shad Landing is south along the Pocomoke River off of route 113. This campground is surrounded by the state forest with over 14,753 acres of lobiolly pine and cypress swamps. Good fishing here as well as boating – different paddling trails – they even have a newsletter called the Pocomoke Paddles which is published four times a year with nature activities and seasonal nature articles for everyone. One can spot river otters, bald eagles and there are over 50 species of fish. There are bike trails, boat launch, camp fire programs, camp store, dump station, hiking trails, playgrounds, ball fields, visitor center, and a per pay for swimming pool. The campground is nice, the rangers are great and if you are older than 62 the state of Maryland gives you 50% off the camping fees Sunday through Thursday nights. Shad Landing has six camping loops all well shaded and two and a half loops with electricity. The showers were not great with not much privacy but at this time of year there was no one else around. We were only there for one night in the rain and thundershowers but we would definitely return. It is a beautiful campground and one can easily visit Asseateague, Ocean City and Chincoteague Island from here.
04/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
I reviewed this campground last year around the same time and much of the information will be the same except Bayside Campground is open again with new bathrooms. We stayed at the National Seashore at the Oceanside Campground Loop 1 in the same site as last year. There is another section Bayside which has a number of loops that are on the Bay and these sites are warmer with less wind than Oceanside. Oceanside has two loops just a dune away from the ocean for RV’s, pop ups etc and tents (make sure you bring extra long stakes) as well as three loops just for tents that you have to walk in over the dunes. These are real nice and the walk in sites are quite private. There is a Maryland State Park Campground just before you enter the National Seashore – they have some electric and these sites are close together in a line but the state park is not always open so check starting and closing dates. The National Park campsites have only pit toilets and no hookups at all but climbing over one dune is the most beautiful beach that goes for miles with the softest sand. The place is beautiful even in the rain. The Bay sites face the Bay and on that side you can go clamming, crabbing, boating, wind surfing and kite surfing. This year is colder than last year so we did not see as many people taking part in those activities. There are miles of bike trails all over the island. I think everyone should visit this gem of our National Park System. Now the wild ponies ( we saw them all over riding our bikes, ) like last year a few came into our campground and campsite. Last year the full moon was out and the beach was beautiful but this year they forecast rain but we had one storm at night and on and off rain for only one day while we were there. This campground is not for everyone but it is rustic and we love it and plan to visit this area whenever we head south from Rhode Island.
04/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Over 300 sites here. Some tenting but the rest all full hookups. This campground is another beach resort state park in Delaware. It’s just off route 1 on the coast with the ocean on one side and two canals on the other. Rehoboth Bay and Indian River Bay are on the west side. This is a huge state park--over 5,193 acres. We camped here on a weekend in April and there were plenty of sites but from Memorial Day through Labor Day you better have reservations. Driving down was easy but everyone says you can’t move in the summer so much so that they have a beach shuttle going up and down the coast. There is plenty of beaches to walk, bike or drive to. In the summer, you can rent at the beach umbrella’s, chairs and rafts. Across the canal from the campground is a marina, a beach for surfers, windsurfing, sailing, kayaking etc. At the campground you can walk to the beach, bike or boat and there is fishing off the canal as well as on the fishing pier and surf fishing from the beach. Clamming is allowed also with the proper license. In season there are marsh hikes and other walks and talks. There is a popular Sandcastle Contest each July which is very popular. The campground has full service from March 1 through November 30 and then limited service the rest of the year. Bathrooms were just redone and are all tiled now and are very nice.
04/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
Cape Henlopen State Park- Thursday, April 16 one night Lewes, Delaware - Over 148 sites - Site 36 but had to change to site 31 with water no electricity sites. Cost for non-resident $32. There is a charge of $4.00 per person to get into the park itself so this is in the campground fee. This is a beach resort campground along the Delaware shore. There are two designated swimming beaches, hiking trails even along the six miles of beach, bike riding, 18 hole disc golf course, basketball courts, winter hunting, recreational programs such as history talks, outdoor concerts, birdwatching and there is even a WW 2 observation tower where the views are great. Also, one can climb the military bunker and I can see why in the summer families come to spend a week or two. The ferry from Cape May, NJ comes in here and the Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge is nearby as well as the Lewes and Rehoboth canal. It is right next to the resort town of Rehoboth Beach! Delaware is such a beautiful state I can see why so many senior citizens are relocating here. Now the campground is different. There are sites for big RV’s and all RV’s have to park along the road by their site – the allotted parking space is big and could hold the biggest coach plus a car or anything you were towing. The sites have a picnic table and fire pits. There are showers but they are cold and are only on for seconds each time you push the button. It’s a good place if tenting and if you are going to the beach. Hiking to the beach is quite a distance. The bike trails are good but this park is huge the largest in Delaware so you could spend the day biking and might get on all the trails etc. The views are great from the trails and the beach near the bathhouse is beautiful. Good campground but not for everyone but we will be back. In April during the week it was self-check in and maybe there were 25 sites taken!
04/2009
rating [ 8/10 ]
Site 16: Cost for an out of state person was $26 with electricity using a senior citizen discount. This is a 68 site campground with modern showers, a dumping station, picnic tables and grills. It is a self-checkin but there are a few hosts sites if you have a problem, and the rangers come around in the early evening to check on everyone. There are also 4 horse campsites. They had also just built a new ranger station at the entrance to the campground this year. We always try to camp at Lums Pond State Park, at least as our first stopover heading south from Rhode Island. It is beautiful but the sites don’t have much privacy even though they are good size sites. The trees are getting taller and it is a great place for families and for one to ride their bikes. But this time Delaware had soaking rain for a day and a half, so no bike riding. There are about 8 sites and some Yurts that have electricity. You can make reservations even the day before like I did. Our site 16, can hold an RV over 45 feet. Because of the heavy rains, the site was very muddy but most sites looked quite dry considering the down pour that this park had. We were able to find sections of our site quite dry and level but we only have an RV that is 25 feet. It is a good thing I made reservations. Another woman paid for this site but I was able to show my printed out reservation confirmation. All the electric sites were taken by 5 in the afternoon. The bathrooms were very clean. If one drove around to the other side of the pond, there was a boat rental place and picnic sites. They used to let you swim on the other side, but because of state budgets cuts with lifeguards and a high bacteria count, that has been stopped. In the campground there is a trail that goes around the whole pond and there is also a fishing pier. Follow the directions off the website, not your GPS by taking 1A off of I-95 in Delaware (much faster than by route 13). It is a good stopover for those from New England, especially if you plan to go down the eastern shore route through Delaware, Maryland and Virginia.
10/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
Nickerson State Park, Orleans or Brewster, MA I have not camped at Nickerson in quite a few years. This is a big park half way down the Cape. There are over 400 sites in 7 sections and they all have their positive points and some negative. Section 1, 2, 3, and 5 are small sections and some sites have water view since there are at least 7 kettle ponds throughout the park. Showers though are in section 4 and sections 6. They have started to rebuild some of their restrooms but the old ones are pretty dingy. There are no utilities here. They do have an amphitheater/ bike rentals/ boat rentals/ nature center and a park store. It is in the woods and be aware that sections 6 and 7 are miles away from the entrance to the park. We have stayed in all the sections. Every area has a pond that you can walk to down a cliff to swim at. Section 1 the swimming area is an easy walk. During the fall not all the sections are open. Sites are not all level but big rigs can find spots especially near the end of the second loop in section 4. Roads driving in the loops are narrow. This campground has 8 miles of bike trails in the park and it connects at the entrance to the Cape Cod Rail Trail which has 25 more miles of bike trail. This trail goes through towns and passes the Cape Cod National Seashore. There are also ponds for boating, hiking, bird watching and picnicking. In the fall it is beautiful and it is the only state park in MA that you can make a 1 night reservation. Unless you have a big, big rig you would not have needed a reservation this fall but in the summer it is a must. Staying here you are near Orleans for shopping, restaurants and heading east the Cape Cod National seashore with more biking trails, visitor center and beautiful beaches (love Head of Meadows). Golden age pass can be used to get into the beaches run by the National Park Service but some beaches are run by the local towns and you must pay for parking but not before around June 21 and after Labor Day but check these dates because they change. One thing you should try if you like Reuben sandwiches the Cape Codder Reuben with a small pot of beans is excellent at Hearth and Kettle restaurant in Orleans (easy drive with plenty of big rig parking, Shaws Supermarket is there too as well as a drug store). The Reuben is made with fish – melts in your mouth! Make sure you check closing dates for any campgrounds in New England because most close at the end of Columbus Day weekend.
10/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
Bourne Scenic Park – Bourne, MA. We haven’t been back to this park in over 15 years and it has changed. It is on the Cape Cod Canal on the east end. This park is on COE land but run by the town of Bourne so the price is higher. It is on the west end of the Cape Cod Canal. We paid with the fall rates $32 with electricity and water. They have added electricity to almost all sites now and the price has gone up to reflect this. There are almost 100 sites in three different sections of this park. Some areas the sites are on top of each other but then there is a wooded section where one could find privacy. Sites can be found for big rigs and for tents. One can park their camper here for the summer season they limit the number allowed to I think one third of the park and there might be a waiting list. What is nice about this campground is that it is right under the Bourne Bridge at the entrance to Cape Cod. Crossing the bridge one can head for the ferry for Martha’s Vineyard or tour that section of the Cape. One can fish, bike or hike along the canal road. Right now they have taken out the natural pond used for swimming and are putting in a huge pool which should be completed by next summer. Biking west there is a small town for restaurants and shopping (small) and heading west you end up at Scusset State Park (which also has camping) with a beach and fishing pier. The canal is lit up at night and at all times you can watch boats crossing the canal – very peaceful. Make sure you check closing dates for any campgrounds in New England because most close at the end of Columbus Day weekend. I believe this one stays open later!
10/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This forest is huge and close to Plymouth for those visiting the Pilgrim tourist’s sites and also in the Fall close to King Richard Faire. There 5 sections to camp in plus another section Charge Pond which has 6 sections of its own. We always stayed at Charge Pond before but it was closed for the fall until they decided to open up 3 sections for Columbus Day weekend. Charge Pond does have its own beach near the A loop but the sites here do not have as much shade as the other areas but these sites are huge. The only other area open for the fall was Barrett’s Pond where we stayed. Narrow roads driving in and there are some big sites but big rigs and those with horses are better at Charge Pond. We travel in a 25 foot Pulse so we had a nice site on Barrett’s Pond. No electricity and the bathrooms need to be redone but it was beautiful in the fall with the leaves turning. There are 16 ponds in the forest and 15 miles of bike trails. One can also canoe and fish on most of the ponds. Hunting in season – deer and game birds are stocked in certain areas in October and November. In the summer, there are interpretive programs, walks especially along all the cranberry bogs that surround this park and there are some near the bike trail for exploring. Blueberries are abundant in the Summer right off some of the camping areas and along the bike trails. You don’t need a reservation in the Fall and might not need one for the summer but check on this depending where you want to camp. Fearing Pond area is great for tent camping and pop ups. Beautiful days spent biking all over the park with only four other campers during the week – we had the bike trails to ourselves. Make sure you have a trail map (found at checking) though because it is confusing. Make sure you check closing dates for any campgrounds in New England because most close at the end of Columbus Day weekend.
10/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground has about 100 sites and one row is right on the beach but most sites can if not see the ocean definitely hear it. Sites are pull through and can fit big rigs. No electricity but beautiful views with 600 acres of barrier beach and salt marsh. The beach at the campground is rocky but a short walk away or bike ride away one can find the public beach which is beautiful – a 2 mile long beach which is breezy all year round which makes it good for surfing and wind surfing. Great birding area one of the best in New England. Also a short bike ride or drive away is a fishing pier which is beautiful with the waves crashing over it. It is a beautiful area and we had a site right on the beach with great sunsets and rises and a clear, blue sky with temperatures in the 70’s in October. One needs reservations here for the summer and in the fall for the beach row but even on Columbus Day weekend one could drive in and get a spot in the back without a reservation. Bathrooms are OK and campfires are allowed. Nice and peaceful but could be noisy in the summer with a lot of kids. Make sure you check closing dates for any campgrounds in New England because most close at the end of Columbus Day weekend
10/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
We have never camped here before. Very interesting – beautiful park. Nice drive through historic Hingham with beautiful old houses to get to the park. Close to Boston (35 minutes away) so that you can drive to the nearest T-station or take the ferry over to Boston and that is what many campers do that stay here. Plymouth is also a short drive down route 3 from here so one can visit many of the Pilgrim tourist attractions. There are two camping sections in this park (262 sites and 140 with electric), one with electric hookups and one without. It looked like sections of the non electric section did not even open this year maybe due to economic reason. Most of the state parks in MA need to remodel their bathrooms and repave their roads and even bike trails. Bike trails and hiking trails run through the park (12 miles of bike trails alone), plus one can bike on old military roads left when the military left this park to the state. Nice ride, beautiful views, ponds and some great birding. Make sure one picks up the trail guide though at the entrance to the camping area because you can get very confused. Mt. Blue Spring is in the park and from the campground one can walk, drive, or bike to the spring to fill out your water bottles or containers for some nice fresh spring water for free. Make sure you check closing dates for any campgrounds in New England because most close at the end of Columbus Day weekend.
10/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
This state park is on the west end of the Cape Cod Canal near the Sagamore Bridge which crosses over to the Cape. There are close to 100 sites here with big sites for all sized rigs and some nice private tent sites. There is electricity and water at each site but not the tent sites. On weekends you would need reservations and during the summer even during the week. No campfires except for the tent sites but there is a big community campfire spot for anyone. This campground is on the canal with biking, fishing (3000 breakwater and 1.5 miles of frontage along the canal), hiking and it also has a beach facing the bay side of the Cape. The canal is lit up at night and at all times you can watch boats crossing the canal – very peaceful. The Lions have a supper on Saturday nights here and a breakfast Sunday morning that one can buy tickets for. Make sure you check closing dates for any campgrounds in New England because most close at the end of Columbus Day weekend.
06/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
Travel-Trailer Village- Site B8 – water, electricity, sewers, laundry, pool - $27 and up We actually wanted to stay in the NPS no utilities campground because it is deep in the woods with biking, hiking, and more privacy but with the heat wave hitting the east coast we decided to stay in this park for the electricity. This is not run by the park service even though it is on Prince William Forest land. A company bids to run it and it is in the process of changing hands right now. To get to the rest of the park you would have to drive all the way around. This park sits on the northern boundary of this park off of Dumfries Road – it is in driving distance of the Springfield intersection which is known for its traffic during rush hour. This campground has 6 rows of sites with close to 15 sites per loop. There is one tree between each site but if they are not full you can have some privacy. The hosts were very nice. There is a small pool and you can ride your bikes on the campground roads between loops. This was convenient for us for a night before driving around the beltway tomorrow towards New England. 27
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
The campground is in two loops with sites 1 through 23 facing the beach but high up on the dunes. The other sites are just as good since everyone can see the ocean and there are a few walkways down. We had one of the beach facing sites. There is no shade here but the ocean and beach make up for it. When we were here the temperature hit 110 degrees very high for Florida at this time of year. There is a nice breeze off the ocean but it was still hot but when you get on the beach it was so much cooler and the water was very comfortable. We spent the whole afternoon swimming in the ocean. Nice beach and sand. Cold water showers outside the restroom and hot showers inside. The campground sign said that it was full, so reservations are needed even during the week. The beach has a lot shells wash up on it and it is a feeding place for pelicans, sandpipers, gulls and other birds. The saltwater fishing is excellent. There are canoe and kayak rentals available at the park and there is a sidewalk along the road that is used for biking. There is a nature trail where one can view wildlife and natural vegetation. All sites have water,electricity, a picnic table and a fire ring. Florida is still in a drought so fires have not been allowed in most of the state campgrounds that we have stayed at. The ranger station even has a lending library for those ages 4-9. At night during the months of May through early September Loggerhead, Green and Leatherback sea turtles crawl on the beach to nest and lay their eggs so lights need to be turned down on the campers that face the ocean. This is really a pretty section of Florida driving the nine miles from Tomoka State Park where we stayed the night before over to A1A at Flagler Beach. The back roads looked like the “old Florida”. Very charming. Just a short distance north of the campground is a good seafood place to eat “Snack Jack” – it has burgers too! The rangers told us not to miss it! This campground is worth a return visit but I guess it is hard to get into to during the snowbird season.
05/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is another nice Florida State Park. There are two loops and about 60 sites. The majority of the sites are shaded. We had site 44 and it definitely was shaded. This loop had more shade than the other one. It cost $22.50 for the night for electricity and water. Reservations were necessary on the weekend and now that school is out in most Florida counties. They have some primitive hike in sites and canoe sites but because of the drought they are not easy to get to. We arrived around noon and had to wait until almost 2:00 PM to get to our site since Florida has a 1:00 PM checkout time and a 3:00 PM check-in time. The people in our site forgot to check out when they left so we had to wait until the rangers could check the campground around 1:30. Others came in and went to their sites right away. This is a busy campground and day area on weekends being so close to Orlando and we arrived on a Saturday for one night. Peaceful campground and we could bike over to the springs to go swimming or boating. The day area was full on Saturday and many cars were turned away – they only have 300 slots for cars and you can not get in for the day until another car leaves and there is no place to park to wait. If you are a camper they have a parking area for you to wait near the ranger station and you can walk around the park and springs while you are waiting. This park is similar to Blue Springs State Park in that on a weekend it is like a foreign country. If you speak English you are in the minority. Oh, well! When we were there some kids had used all the toilet paper and stuffed the toilets with them. We did not see the rangers ride around as much as other Florida State Parks but they seem to be shorthanded and had to control the day visitors in the Spring area. There were also a number of sites with more than 8 people on them. This spring is a constant 72 degrees year round where you can swim or snorkel. Forty-two million gallons of crystal clear water flow each day from the springs into Wekiwa Springs Run. In the river there are over 32 different kinds of fish and the park has an abundance of birds of all types. There are alligators and some bald eagles but also turkeys, turtles, and deer. The park has over 7,600 acres and some walks which show Florida as it used to be. There is a 15 mile trail to canoe on the Wekiva River lined with sabal palms, purple astors and orchids. This is bear country and the snakes were active the first weekend in June that we were there. There is a nature center with some live animal displays and a park concession stand. The park stays open until 8 for swimming. Nice springs but like the springs at Blue Spring State Park better but liked the campground here more!
05/2008
rating [ 10/10 ]
This park is near Ft. Meyers, which is part of the Lake Okeechobee and the Okeechobee Waterway – first western lock. $12 with golden age pass. There are 30 sites with water and electricity and 8 boat sites. This campground is about ten miles off Interstate 75 and located on the Caloosahatchee River. It has exotic vegetation and tropical atmosphere. Every site but the two middle ones are on the water - either the salt water side or the fresh water side. Nice breeze even though today was over 90. All sites have a cement slab with covered picnic table, water and electricity, and fire pit. The lock is there but boats coming through the lock take place up river. There is a recreational section that is across the river but the drive around is about 8 miles but there is swimming at the recreational section. The campground has a dump station, hot showers, public phones, a fishing pier and picnic tables around the park for campers only off their sites. This is a very peaceful campground with very nice hosts. Our site was on the point between the split of the river – very nice. At night there was a full moon and with the lights from the lock and boat docks it was beautiful. It was so nice to sit outside late at night and just watch the moon’s reflection off the water.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Nine RV sites, five tent sites, and six boat sites. $24 but with golden age half price. Water, electricity, playground, showers, picnic shelter, boat ramp and at 10:00 and 3:00 you can watch the boats go through the locks. This is a small campground but very nice and the sites are big enough for big rigs. Peaceful and only about a mile off the interstate and close to Stuart. We rode our bikes and enjoyed watching the boats go through the locks as well a a manatee. Typical Corps Of Engineers campground – nice!
05/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a very nice campground but busy. We had site 1 which faced the inlet and it was a good one. The campground used to be bigger but they have closed one loop, don’t know if this was because of hurricane damage or not. This State Park has a marina, restaurant, a number of fishing piers, beaches, birds (tons of Pelicans and Osbreys), picnic areas, two museums, boat docks and rentals. We rode our bike around and at night with all the lights it is beautiful. We camped for one night in May so it was not full and there were no host campers but they have two sites for them. Nice breeze from the ocean and the inlet and interesting watching all the people fishing. So many Pelicans and on the fishing pier we also were able to enjoy two Manatees swimming and coming up for air. Enjoyable campground! The beaches are a great place to surf, snorkel, skidoo and get some sun.
05/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
We stayed at this campground for one night the first weekend in May on our way to the Keys. It was hot and crowded. The campsite was full and the day area was packed on the Saturday. We definitely were the only ones speaking English. The day area has hiking areas and boardwalks that go to the spring. At the spring you can tube, snorkel, boat down the river to the swimming area bring your own equipment or rent it there. It is beautiful and I enjoyed snorkeling in the springs but it was over crowded. During the winter months the Manatees swim here and it is off limits for swimming, it must be very nice to see them and being cooler much more enjoyable. I believe this river runs north and the current is deceiving when you are trying to go up stream – very strong. The spring per day releases over 110 million gallons of water. The water stays at 72 degrees and being from New England the water felt warm to me but the Floridians were all complaining about how cold it is. It is not as cold as Alexander Springs where we have camped quite a few times because when you swim there you stay cold all day and it takes some time to get into the springs. One local swimmer was telling us that the springs at Blue Springs State Park are being destroyed because they don’t have showers for people to rinse off before they go in and the chemicals on the bodies are causing pollution and they let too many people use the park everyday. One girl on a raft was even smoking and you know where that butt was going to go when she finished it- could not believe it. Glad we camped here for one night but don’t know if I would return on a weekend during the hot months. I don’t think the State of Florida had enough help to manage this state park the way it needs to be done. This was our first camping in a Florida State Park in over ten years so maybe things have changed and they are directing their funds out of the parks.
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
We stayed in the North East loop with full hookups because we wanted to dump the last night of our camping trip before we drive back home the next day. They have two other loops with just electricity (these are not as private as most of the other loops). They also have about 5 other loops without any utilities. These loops are pretty, private and some of them (Miles & Elk) have some sites looking out from the cliffs looking down on the river. At the state park one can boat, fish, swim on the western shore, bird-watching, canoeing, and hunt in season. It really is a beautiful state park on an inlet between the North East River, Elk River and the Chesapeake Bay– there was a nice breeze from the rivers considering that the temperature was in the 90’s. You can make reservations but on weekends you must reserve two nights! There is a park store with a little restaurant attached and behind it is a trail that goes to a lake where one can catch some Bass. There are a number of other trails to hike in the park – one goes down to the Elk Island lighthouse. The trails go through forests, wetlands, marshes. The roads are a little hilly to ride your bikes but it can be done! Nice park and plan to return. If you are over 62 from any state you get 50% your camping fee.
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Some loops they reserve for groups like the boy scouts etc. Loops A and D were open on this June weekend so it was not full but they do take reservations non site specific from Memorial Day to Labor Day. No hookups of any kind but at least one restroom in each loop has a shower. The NPS needs to put some money into redoing the bathrooms etc but that is the only complaint I have. We camped there for two nights. This was during the heatwave and though it was hot it was not unbearable staying there. Very shaded with some nice breeze blowing through. Saw one raccoon and we had deer in our campsite during most of the day they are not afraid at all. There are picnic areas in this park and a number of nice walking trails. Off of loop D there is a trail that goes to the Greenbelt Metro to hop into DC. It is about a mile to walk there. This park is amazing – it has over 1100 acres and it is just 12 miles from downtown DC. It is beautiful. I was surprised how safe it was and very quiet. The host was excellent. Best of all they have sheds of free firewood for your fires at night. They have about two bins in each loop and they fill them everyday. This is close to route 1 and the University of Maryland and when you pull out you are on 193 so there are a number of restaurants around the park and near the University. There are some ranger programs at night but you need to check the schedule and they also have guided walks. Some of the trails are also for those with their own horses. Great park and it is open all year!
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is a very convenient stop off of I95 in Selma, NC on your way down south or heading north. We stopped here on our way back towards Rhode Island after traveling close to two months. The people were very friendly it seems to be a young couple and they are trying very hard to please. The bathrooms were so clean – you have a code to get into them. They have satellite and also a RV wash (this is extra). There is also lake but not for swimming but you can fish with no license required but it is a catch and release. The cars on 95 at night did not bother us but we had the air conditioning on because the temperature hit over 90 again but the whole eastern seaboard is having a heat wave. It is definitely an easy on and off when traveling interstate 95.
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Wifi is available, but you might have to move to another spot like near the office if your site is under the trees. We had a pull through site under the trees and it was nice but very close to the sites and campers next to us. This park is about two blocks away from the beach but it does have it’s own pool. The hosts were very friendly and helpful. We only stayed for one night but we would return even though we do like more privacy between sites.
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
You can make reservations here but not site specific and I believe that is the way Georgia does it for most of their state parks. This campground is on the coast situated on the Crooked River. There are over 500 acres with campsites, cottages, picnic shelters, pioneer group campground, nature center, boat ramp, dock and a miniature golf that cost $2 per person open year round. One can ride bikes on the roads but not on the trails. This park is known for all the different birds that stop here on the way south and north. There is no swimming but if you have a boat you can go on the river and also over to the Cumberland Island National Seashore. This is a great campground to stay at if you plan to take the ferry over to Cumberland Island National Seashore for a day visit. You might want to make reservations first – the ferry leaves from St. Mary’s National Visitor Center at 9 and you return by 5:30. It is only seven miles away from the campground. St. Mary’s is a cute little historic town with quaint shops and restaurants to visit when you stay at Crooked River State Park.
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Follow the directions from the website not the GPS and even then it can get confusing to find it. Nice drive in the park to find the campground loop near the beach and fishing pier. This park has over 1,427 acres with live oaks draped with Spanish Moss which makes biking the roads very comfortable. Offers great wildlife viewing. You can swim in the ocean at the beach site but at the other campground which is shaded and along the river you can also swim there. The park is the Gateway Station to the Great Florida Birding Trail. It is also known for shark tooth hunting and shelling along the beaches. The rangers were very nice and we had an enjoyable time. If you haven’t camped here before you should try it out.
06/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
Little Talbot Island State Park is north of Jacksonville and is another great Florida State Park. It only has about 36 sites and if you a RV over 25 feet I would think twice about staying there. There is basically one road into the campground and it is narrow and on rocky sand. There is not enough room for two RV to pass. The road is curvy and there are some sites that an RV would not be able to back in. Most of the sites are shady and there seem to be a lot of tenters here. We had site 35 which was out by the creek and did not have much shade but there was plenty of room for an RV to back in and move around since it is a wide open space for those bringing boats to the boat dock. If you had a kayak or canoe these would be good sites. Looking over the sites 17,18,19,25 and 38 are good shady sites than an RV could fit in but again I would not take anything over 25 feet. It is a pretty park on it’s own island which is part of the Talbot Islands State Parks system which includes Little Talbot Island, Amelia Island, George Crady Bridge State Fishing Pier, Big Talbot Island, Fort George Island, Yellow Bluff Fort and Pumpkin Hill Creek Preserve.. There are five miles of beaches which are a bike ride away from the campground – beautiful. One can fish, canoe, kayak, surf, swim, bike, horseback riding, tour on a Segway tour and hike here. It is also a great place for observing all types of birds coming and going during the seasons. It is beautiful here and very peaceful.
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Reservations are needed even though there were sites open when we were there but on the weekend the ranger said they are full. I love this campground. It has a beautiful beach, a wind surfing and surfing section, boat rentals, picnic area, a snack bar and a hot spot for Wifi at Island Joe’s 24-7. Bikers can also bike around all the loops in the campground as well as on bike trails along the main road. In the campground there are playgrounds, hot showers, electricity and a pathway to the campfire circle. There are 139 sites and every restroom also has laundry facilities.. There is a bedtime lending library for ages four to nine. All the sites are nice with a lot of shade and over the years I have stayed in almost all of them but have not been back in over twelve years. I would choose the Coquina loop if you could. It is the closest loop to the beach so has the coolest breeze and if riding your bikes to the beach it cuts your distance down by over half than from some of the other loops. The rangers were nice when checking in. The only problem that we had was finding the right road to turn in to – there are signs but deceiving. We turned into the lighthouse road twice before we got the right road. It is near Historic St. Augustine which is one of my favorites places to visit with a fort, mission and quaint downtown. Definitely one of the best little towns in Florida but it has changed in twelve years and has the traffic and sprawl with it! The beach is great with waves that are very strong. We drove around all over and this town is no longer RV friendly. Therefore we got the heck out of there and I don’t think we will ever be back. Too bad – it was my grandparents favorite city in Florida and we always stopped there on our way down from Rhode Island. Not any more I guess they don’t want or need campers!
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Juniper Springs Recreational Area (Ocala National forest) - $9 Golden Age Pass – Site 7 (9 is good) a pull through. **This campground has a raccoon problem a major one. Raccoons all over during the day in campground on the trails and at the springs. Campers and day visitors are feeding them and they think it is cute. We first met one on our bikes and he would not move and get out of the way next we were having lunch at our site on a beautiful picnic table and one came out of the woods and straight at us. He would not stop he was coming for our sandwiches. We had to grab our food and go into the camper. He circled us for about twenty minutes smelling our bike and our camper and picnic table. At the springs we saw them all over the area every time anyone left their picnic table the raccoons were on the table and into their stuff. We have been around raccoons but never have we seen this many out during the day and not afraid of humans. Florida needs to fine anyone who feeds them because this is a beautiful park and the raccoons are not shy and come out during breakfast, lunch and dinner time. There is even a hawk in the park who has stolen steaks off the grills while people are cooking. This campground is beautiful with three loops one for tents and the other two for anyone for a total of 79 sites. Many pull through sites. Bathrooms are nice and there is a lantern stand at each site. There is a short walk to the springs and they are nice to swim in. A little nature walk with a historic mill museum on the property. There are no hookups here so this week you did not need reservations but on the weekends you do all year long. During the snowbird season they are always full. There are canoe rentals for the near 8 mile canoe run through the Juniper Prairie Area which takes over four hours. At the springs there is a convenience store with camping supplies, beach supples, food, drinks etc. One might see at this campground deer, black bear, turkey, birds and more raccoons than you want to see.. They do have interpretive programs during certain times during the year at the amphitheater. This is a beautiful campground and I think since there were only about ten campers when we were there we saw more raccoons then normal.
06/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Another beautiful Florida State Park just north of Daytona near the beach but on the Intracoastal Waterway. The north end of the park has over 12 miles of shoreline for boating and over 2000 acres with hammock and salt marshes. The river banks have remains of oyster and snail shell mounds left by the Indians. The live oak hammocks are covered in Spanish moss, ferns and green-fly orchids. There is no swimming in the park because of the alligators. The roads around the campground are all hard dirt with a lot of sand and some of the roads are hard for a large camper to move around. We have only a 24 foot RV and we can see why the park has a limit of 34 feet and 11 in height to stay here. We found it very hard to ride our road bikes on the hard dirt here because of all the sand. Very easy to spin out on your bikes. Even wild coffee and sage can be found on the shell mounds. There are nature trails to walk, visitor center and picnic areas. The salt marshes one can find oysters, snails, crabs, fish with over 160 species of birds looking for their next meal. During the summer manatees stay in the the Tomoka river and one can see dolphins as well as alligators, raccoons, bobcats, deer and otters. The campground is under a shady hammock and there is a restriction of camper length and height 43 by 11 feet. Just a warning the first weekend in March is biker week and there is a week in October that is Octoberfest for bikers so the park is crowded and one needs reservations. There were some sites available the first weekend in June but I would still make reservations if you are traveling on the road. After having spent a day at Wekiwa Springs State Park on a Saturday this park was a nice peaceful retreat.
05/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
We have not camped at Ft. Wilderness in 12 years and this is the first time for us without our children since we were married. I will give you the pros and the cons. Pros – It’s Disney and the whole atmosphere is great. They have more busses now going to everything so there is less of a wait but did notice some of the cabin loops waited for quite awhile. The Hoop De Do is there and that is good. The boat dock and beach are there and the bathrooms are wonderful. We were there Memorial Weekend and the following week and were surprised that the crowds were not big at the parks during the weekend. The campground though was crowded but the loops thinned out after the holiday weekend. They still have the water light parade at 9:45 every night on the Bay and Magic Kingdoms fireworks behind it which is beautiful. Checkin was fast and easy and the staff was great. You don’t even get out of your car or camper to checkin. They now put out a little schedule of all the activities during the day for people staying at the campground – great for kids. They still have the movies at night at the campfire. Staying at the campground you can find a bus to anywhere in Disney World and Downtown Disney. This is the best thing! Also one of the best deals (don’t tell Disney though) is that if you purchased a mug for $12 you can fill it up with soda, water, coffee, tea etc as much as you want during your whole stay at Disney. Every resort does this so you can go with your mug from resort to resort and drink away! Disney tries to control smoking around their resorts but there seems to be a lot more people smoking in Florida then other states, and no one thinks they are littering when they throw their butts on the ground. Cons – The cost keeps going up and it is close to $100 a night for the premium sites. Since I made my reservation a year ago they have raised the price three times and now they charge more if you are there for a weekend then they do for the week so that your rate is not the same the whole time. No Wifi except for three places around the park (for the price you pay they should have wifi). They charge you for the wifi $10 for 24 hours which is over $300 for wifi for a month and that is just for the internet nothing else. Our loop was quiet, but some of the other loops especially during the holiday weekend were noisy, but not during the week. They are planning some big changes here with adding or expanding sites to become pull throughs and more sites for the big, big rigs. I can’t imagine what they are going to charge for these changes. This campground went from not allowing pets to having one loop with pets to – during our bike rides we counted at least 10 loops for campers with pets so they have really changed their policy. Right now during the week the park was only a third filled but on the weekends totally filled – it used to be always filled.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Rally Park – Lazydays – Seffner, Florida – right outside of Tampa off of I4. This campground is tied in with Lazydays, and if you go online they have an internet special for first timers there for three days and two nights. You must register ahead of time online. They will send you a letter and coupons for the meals. You get one of their almost 300 sites with water, electricity, and sewers. Complimentary breakfast and lunch Monday through Saturday – 50 amp hook up, cable tv, wireless internet, morning newspaper delivery and rv seminars if you want them. There is a recreation center, laundry facilities, screened and heated pool and Jacuzzi, tennis, horseshoes and shuffleboard. There is a service center, plus the biggest selection of RV’s to look at. Tennis, horseshoes and shuffleboard, starbucks coffee all the time and concierge services. On site there is also a Flying J, Cracker Barrel, and camping world. I believe the rate for staying there without the first timers program is close to $20. When there is a big rally the rates may go up because of more activities scheduled but no matter what it is still a good deal.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
County Park – water and electricity and close to $40 a day now for an rv (last year it was 25 – big jump). Florida has so many taxes on tourists, the tourist development tax, sale and county. Three loops in the campground – one for vans, tents and popups, one for rv’s and others with pets and one for rv’s etc. All the reviews have been right on about this campground – it is beautiful and the sites are private with a lot of shade. Ours was facing west over the gulf so the sunsets were beautiful with a nice breeze coming off water. There are bike trails, a fort and one of the best beaches in the country to walk, ride or drive to. The bathrooms could be more updated but they are ok and the showers are hot. Easy checkin and the campground is very quiet at night and even during the day. We went in May during the week for three nights so were able to get reservations for a site and there were many other sites available but they did have posted that they are booked every weekend through July. I know it’s very hard to get reservations here from January through April and I can see why. Everyone we met complained about how hard it is to get a site during those months. If you book though they do not give out refunds if you have to cancel but, you have a year to remake reservations. It worked out well for us because we canceled last year and stayed this year at last years price, and that was close to almost $15 a day difference. They do have laundry facilities, a camp store, playgrounds, dump station and a campers dayroom. Would love to come back but if only we could get reservations! There is a raccoon problem here from late in the afternoon through the evening and you can not leave any food out and even your coolers. The squirrels are brazen too one tried to sit in my husbands chair and join me eating peanuts outside. I had to go inside the camper to get rid of him.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground started in 1964, and has something like 80 permanent trailer sites and 250 travel trailer sites. We were put in a section with about ten others campers and tents, but this campground is huge with many different parts. The workers were very friendly, and you followed someone on a golf cart to your site. There are tropical birds all over the park and little duck ponds. The bathrooms could use an update but not very many people use them especially those living or staying in the park models. You can walk to the beach (long walk better taking a bike). The Sanibel beaches are sandy and beautiful, and they do have waves not like the Keys. Shells everywhere, and you see everyone bending over to collect them. They have boat rentals available at the Marina. This campground is the only one on Sanibel Island, and you can easily bike to everything – shops, restaurants, groceries and sites. We did drive to the Ding Wildlife Refuge and the Shell Museum but everything else we biked too – nice and level and wide bike lanes on both sides of the roads away from the main road. We did have reservations but a number of campers came in and were able to get a site without them. It is May and not there busiest time of year which is January through the beginning of April, and reservations are hard to come by at those times of the year. Their low season starts in June and the price drops down ten dollars for full hookups. Price is high, but the park is cute and it is on Sanibel and if you stayed in the parks across the bridge in Ft. Myers you would have to pay the $6 toll everyday. Enjoyable stay !
05/2008
rating [ 10/10 ]
60 sites - $23 plus taxes. This campground is very interesting. The sites are all a good size with shade – water and electricity. Pretty campground. The restroom is in the center of the campground with a laundry and hot showers. There are grapefruit trees around and palm trees. On the grounds there is also a playground, picnic area, boat area and you can rent canoes to travel the Estero River which used to be the main route for goods to be shipped before route 41 was built. It is right off route 41 and the bike trails along that route. The rangers were very nice here and there is also the Koreshan Unity Settlement to visit on the park grounds. This is a must see and is a bike ride away from your site. This was a religious communal society established here in 1894. The grounds and many of its buildings were donated to the state of Florida in 1961. There are many buildings to visit and the walkways along the Estero River are quiet and peaceful. This was a hard working group who believed in hard work, education, the arts and music, security, order and a sense of achievement. There is a self-guiding trail using guidesheets or sometimes a ranger or host takes people on a tour. The self-guiding one is free and the host led tour costs around $2.00. The buildings are furnished and they have put up glass so that you .May with a cool breeze so it was very enjoyable walking around.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Key Largo, Florida $26 plus taxes The last time we camped here was close to 18 years ago and it was raining, cold and windy. We stopped for an overnighter in May this time and there was a nice breeze, sun and clear skies. The camp sites are ok not as nice as some of the other ones in the keys and none on the ocean but the rest of the park is great. Mangrove trails, boating, scuba tours and snorkeling tours. A visitor center with all types of fish, information and movie. Three beaches and at Cannon Beach a Spanish ship was sunk for a coral reef. You can see tons of fish and old cannons there – we had a great day snorkeling. The last time we were there my oldest daughter about 10 at the time and I went out on the snorkeling tour and there was a storm – it was tough snorkeling and the boat swung around and almost hit us on the head so this time my husband and I stayed closer to shore and it was great. Beautiful weather and a great place to camp. What was interesting though we just spent a week in the Keys camping – Bahia Honda, Curry Hammock, Long Key and John Pennicamp is the only one that had a campground full sign out and it was full yet if you make reservations it is easier to get into this campground than the other three.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
$26 plus taxes. Long Key State Park is located on Long Key in Florida. Every site faces the ocean. There are 60 sites but some are for tents only. Big rigs can fit but the road in is narrow. It seems that there used to be more palm trees and underbrush between all the sites; but in the last year much of it has been cut down and cleared for many reasons. For some sites, even though they state partial shade, they are not really shaded. The ocean shore line is rocky but you can find sections to walk out and snorkel and there is a lot of boating in the area. It is a nice park; the bathrooms are clean, and the rangers helpful. In the park there are a few hikes, like the Golden Orb Trail/ Layton Trail/ a nature trail and they even have a canoe trail where you can rent a canoe and they give you a detailed map and pamphlet. We stayed two nights here. We rode our bikes all over the campground as well as the bike trail just outside of the park that goes all the way into Marathon. There are snakes in the park so one needs to watch their step when hiking on some of the trails. Fishing everywhere which is one of the biggest recreational draws of the Keys. It is part of the Great Florida Birding Trail so you do find some interesting and endangered birds in the park. Sea Turtles do nest on the beaches so they ask they you have lights out at night – but it is not patrolled like the South Carolina beaches. Interesting park and we will be back!
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Curry Hammock, listed as Marathon, has 28 sites. We stayed at Curry Hammock State Park for just one night and it is delightful. We had a water site. The park is clean and they imported a lot of white sand for this summer. Our site was just a walk away from the ocean and there are some trees for shade in parts of the park. Bathrooms are clean but the toilets are upgraded pits, but there are showers. This park has only been open for about 4 to 5 years. It is always closed after Memorial Day until November, but this year they are staying open all summer. It did not show on the computer yet so if you want to go during this summer call for now. We did have reservations the second weekend in May, but there were still sites available. There are over 1000 acres and there are thatch palms where the white-crowned pigeon finds his habitat. Two miles of the Overseas Railroad trail for hiking and biking to Marathon goes through the park. It’s a great place to kayak and canoe. We did snorkel but I can’t say it was as good as Bahia Honda. Plan to return. Was very peaceful with a nice breeze even on a hot day.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Florida mile marker 37. This is a wonderful state park with over 80 campsites in three areas. Bayside without electricity (not for RV’s), Sandspur for tents, popups and vans with electricity and water and Buttonwood for everyone with electricity and water. Some sites face the gulf side and some of the tent sites face the ocean side. You can snorkel, bike, fish, swim, picnic, kayaking or hike up to the old bridge. There is a nature center with talks by the rangers. The water is like that beautiful carribean blue and in May it was enjoyable but still hot. We had site 12 where the little fishing dock was in back of and we could see both bridges (new and old) from our site. Very enjoyable three day stay. Checkout is at 1 and checkin at 3 but if you come in early you can enjoy the park until your site is cleared.
05/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
John Dickerson State Park – Hobe Sound, Florida – two campgrounds Pine Grove and River – 24 plus tax – water and electricity. Pine Grove has 90 sites but this section was destroyed by a hurricane and there is limited shade. River is 4 miles in from the ranger station and it has 44 sites but these are well shaded and close to the boat dock, swimming, trails and bike trails. When we visited in early May there was no swimming because of bacteria or alligators. The River campground is not made for big rigs even though there are large sites the road in is narrow and hardly any room to back in – would not put anything more than a 25 footer in one of these sites. It was really hot when we were there so the Pine Grove sites you needed air conditioning until late afternoon. There are some nice bike trails there and the rangers were very nice.
05/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
$27 plus tax and bed tax . Two hundred ninety-three sites plus some cabins. All sites come with electricity, water and sewer. This is a county park which is huge. They have a beautiful drive-in where the park itself has picnic areas, disc golf, boating, nature trails, bike trails, and miles of beaches and lakes. The campground itself has a punch in code entrance which is also used for the restrooms. The main road has street signs (small little green signs) with every loop having a letter from A to V. There are restrooms for every three loops, laundry area, camp store, covered hall as well as amphitheater and a lake pavilion. No swimming in the lake only in the ocean – resident alligator. It is a very nice campground and there are sites for big rigs but the roads in the campground are narrow. While we were there a caravan of big rigs came in and were all placed in the K loop. Follow your GPS because it went over bridges that my maps did not even show and we were in the campground before we knew it. When we drove in there is a naval base also and I thought we were coming into the naval base; but no, we were on the right track. Check-in was friendly, quick, and the campground hosts were all nice. They make rounds to check the campsites and there is a resident police officer that lives right near the gate of the campground. All the sites are in the woods mixed with palm trees and most sites are huge. There are some stray cats, raccoons, owls and lots of birds. You would never know that you are near a city like Jacksonville. We were the only campers in our area. May is a good time to camp because spring break is over and there were not many campers. One of the hosts said they don’t get too many snowbirds because they can’t stay for over a month but they do get families on spring break, weekends and in the summer. An interesting campground well worth checking out.
04/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Hunting Island State Park – Hunting Island, South Carolina - $23 plus taxes site 47 – water and electricity. Another great SC campground. There are over 200 sites in this campground. Some loops are crowded while the loops in the woods have more private sites. We had a site right on the beach with the boardwalk right next to us and the waves putting us to sleep at night. Nice couple who checked us in on the road by the office and gift shop – fast, quick and easy. Nice beach and the palm trees are beautiful throughout the whole state park. We rode our bikes over to the main entrance and saw the Hunting Island lighthouse, gift shop and beaches. Nice area! We also rode on the nature trail which ended at a section that had been hit by a hurricane with trees down all over – very interesting. This was about a 45 minute ride over and back and if you wait until the tide is at low tide you can ride your bikes on the beach and be over there in 5 but if the high tide comes in you can’t get back that way so watch the tide charts. I can see why everyone raves about this campground!
04/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Edisto Beach State Park – Edisto Beach, South Carolina -$23 plus tax and fees – site 23 Beach Campground – water and electricity. This campground has two sections one is in the woods where the sites are pretty, private and huge. Great walk in tent sites here! It is warmer in this section but not bad. The other is on the beach. Some of the beach sites are in a field and others are among the palm trees one dune away from the beach. Not as private as the other section. It is very relaxing here with a nice breeze blowing most of the day. The showers are hot! There are bike trails that go to the next campground as well as to the interpretive center, boat dock, forest trail and to the Spanish Mount. The trails are not paved but they are hard pressed. They go through beautiful palm trees and over bridges. The Spanish Mount Trail is interesting ending with a Mount that used to be over a half an acre wide and 20 feet high of crushed oyster and clam shells where they think the Indians used to have get together and celebrations. We really enjoyed the bike trails here. There is also a Piggly Wiggly, Package Store, Subway, Restaurant, Gas Station and State Beach across the street from the Beach Campground in walking distance. Campers in the beach section must keep their lights blocked from the beach at night so that the turtles will come out and lay their eggs. Bring extra drinking water because the water has a salty taste. Nice campground!
04/2008
rating [ 10/10 ]
James Island County Campground – Charleston, South Carolina - $27 plus tax – Site 34 – water and electricity. This campground run by the county is very interesting and the park itself is huge. Nice bathrooms with activity center, miles of bike trails, camp store etc. The park itself has a number of fields and ponds for everything – dogs, kids, fishing, splash center etc. Our site was on a little pond with a fountain in it near the activity center. We had shade, palm trees, birds and a swing to sit and watch everything. Very nice just make sure you follow the directions from the website not your GPS. They have a shuttle for a fee that takes you to Charleston Visitor Center (they even dropped us off at Fort Sumter) , or to Folly Beach and they are quite close to a Piggly Wiggly and a Wal-Mart. They have primitive sites for those that want to camp in the field without electricity. Their festival of lights at Xmas time is very well known and campers come from all over to spend weeks staying in the park. They are open year round and are full most of the year
04/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Huntington Beach Campground – Huntington Beach, South Carolina - $23 plus fees and taxes – Site 3 – water and electricity. Sites? This campground is on the beautiful grounds of the state park and the former home of Archer and Ann Huntington – Atalaya (very interesting)which is open daily and free to explore. Brookline Gardens is across the site also built by the Huntingons. Beaches are beautiful, places to ride bikes all over the park and some sites are more private than others. Very peaceful, education center, marsh boardwalks, bird watching, alligators, palm trees. Enjoyable place to camp and we will be back! The only negative is that there is no privacy when trying to change up in the shower stall but the showers are hot.
04/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Cedar Point Campground = Croatan National Forest, Cedar Point, NC Golden Age pass with electricity $8.50. This campground has 35 sites. The sites are spaced around two loops and all have lamp posts. There are no full hookups but there is a dump station and showers. It is very nice and peaceful with a host who comes around checking on everyone. There is a small fishing pier and boat ramp. The marsh and inter coastal waterway is perfect for kayaks and canoes to navigate the canals. There is a nice Tideland Trail for walking which goes through the salt marsh and the woods and on boardwalks over the marsh where crabs can be found. There are benches and interpretive signs to read along the way. This campground is close to Atlantic Ocean beaches in the area. It is very nice!
04/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
Kiptopeke State Park, Cape Charles, Virginia -123 sites- $31 with electricity and water and cable April 21 I had heard good things about this state park just before you go over the Bay Bridge in Virginia to Norfolk. The rangers were very nice at check in and we arrived on a semi rainy day during the week so had no problems getting a site during the Spring. The bathrooms were big and clean but the showers have no place to hangup your towels or clothes or changing area. There is a number of walks to take and a beautiful beach with soft sand. A fishing pier that overlooks the bay with shipwrecks lined up and the bay bridge in the distance. This is a migratory bird flyway stopover for a number of birds on their way south or north. In the fall there are thousands of birds who land here of all types including butterfly's. There are over four miles of trails or hiking, bird watching and biking. We enjoyed our stopover here but would really like to return in the fall for the bird migration. I was told you need reservations for that time period and it is a good idea to have them for the summer and weekends.
04/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Assateague Island National Seashore – Assateague Island, Maryland sites ? April 19,20- $10 a night with golden age pass. We stayed at the National Seashore at the Oceanside Campground Loop 1. There are two campgrounds Bayside (The NPS has closed the three loops in the Bayside while they work on redoing the bathrooms etc – they are going to be open this summer) and Oceanside. Oceanside has two loops just a dune away from the ocean for RV’s, pop ups etc and tents as well as three loops just for tents that you have to walk in over the dunes. These are real nice and some of the sites the walk is not bad at all. There is a Maryland State Park Campground just before you enter the National Seashore – they have some electric and these sites are close together in a line. The National one has pit toilets and no hookups at all but climbing over one dune is the most beautiful beach that goes for miles with the softest sand. Sometimes you see campers riding their horses. The place is beautiful. The Bay sites face the Bay and on that side you can go clamming, crabbing, boating, wind surfing and kite surfing. There are miles of bike trails all over the island. I think everyone should visit this gem of our National Park System. Now the wild ponies – we saw them all over riding our bikes, along the roadside and a bunch came into our campground and campsite. The days we were there the full moon was out and the beach was just beautiful to watch from the boardwalks from the campgrounds.
04/2008
rating [ 9/10 ]
Lums Pond State Park, Bear , Delaware number of sites 67- April 18- 27 with electricity. This is a 68 site campground with modern showers, a dumping station, picnic tables and grills. It also has 4 horse campsites. We have not camped at Lums Pond State Park in 14 years but have always used this as our first stopover and last stopover heading south from Rhode Island. It is beautiful. The trees are getting taller and it is a great place for families and for one to ride their bikes. There are now 8 sites and a couple of yurts with electricity but I would suggest that one make reservations for those. The bathrooms were very clean. If one drove around to the other side of the pond there was a boat rental place and picnic sites. They use to let you swim on the other side but because of state budgets cuts with lifeguards and a high bacteria count that has been stopped. In the campground there is a trail that goes around the whole pond and there is also a fishing pier. We saw turtles on logs and other wildlife in the pond. Lums Pond is Exit 1 off the Delaware Turnpike off I-95 in Delaware and then you drive down 8 miles. It is a good stopover for those from New England and especially if you plan to go down the eastern shore route through Delaware, Maryland and Virginia.
09/2006
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a National Forest Campground on the Kancamagus Highway near the village of Lincoln and the Franconia Notch area of New Hampshire. It is near Loon Mt for skiing and there is a bike trail from Loon into the village of Lincoln where one can find stores and places to eat. The bike trail runs along the river and is very nice especially in the fall when the leaves are turning. This campground was $18 a night and half price for the golden age pass. It has two loops. The sites are large and shaded. There are no hookups or showers. There is a tent section that is beautiful. The sites are private and along the Pemigewasset River river. One can walk to the river and in the summer months there are a number of places to swim in your own private area. There are a lot of hiking areas in the White Mountains – it is a beautiful area. We really enjoyed this campground and plan to return. It is one of the most popular campgrounds in the White Mt. region. It is open in the winter without facilities for winter campers many who cross country ski or downhill at Loon or Cannon. We camped here in a 25 foot motor home and no problems getting in – in September and October but heard that it does fill up quickly in the summer. All of these National Forest campgrounds are on a self-pay system so make sure you have the exact change to put into the envelope.
10/2006
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is another National Forest campground in the White Mountains to the west of the village of Lincoln. It fills up in the summer on weekends, but when we were there in the fall 2006, there was only one other camper midweek and the host was not there. It costs about $17 a night and half for golden age. It has bathrooms but no showers or hookups. Across the street the Ammonoosuc River runs by and it is a pretty walk and picnic area. You can see the Mts. on a clear day. It is a quiet campground. We did not see any wildlife but moose have been spotted here often. All of these National Forest campgrounds are on a self-pay system so make sure you have the exact change to put into the envelope.
09/2006
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a National Forest Campground that is open all year long but without services in the winter. There are no hookups or showers. It is a small campground about 26 wooded sites and it is located along the Mad River. There are some sites along the river. We camped there in the fall and the hose was there and three other campers. It is near Waterville Valley Ski area and the shops at the base of the Mt. The scenic Waterville Valley is a great place to hike in the summer. It was about $17 a night. We camped here in a 25 foot motor home in the fall of 2006. All of these National Forest campgrounds are on a self-pay system so make sure you have the exact change to put into the envelope.
10/2006
rating [ 7/10 ]
This was our first visit to Passaconaway. It is another National Forest campground along the famous Kancamagus in the White Mountains. There are no hookups or showers but some of the sites are along the Swift River. There are about 32 sites in the woods and some are just beautiful with the tall trees. It is a quiet campground with a host. It is so close to Jigger Johnson, that one can drive there to use the showers which are pay. This campground is not open in the winter, but it fills up in the summer after Jigger Johnson is full. There are campers that prefer this campground to Jigger Johnson. We camped here in a 25 foot motor home in the fall of 2006 and did not have problems getting in. It costs about $17 a night. All of these National Forest campgrounds are on a self-pay system so make sure you have the exact change to put into the envelope.
10/2006
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is one of our favorite National Forest Campgrounds in the White Mountains along the Kancamagus. There are flush toilets and pay showers and the sites are big with lots of trees. It is a great place to ride a bike and it is along the Swift River. It is near the Russell-Colbath National Historic Place an 1830 homestead that you can walk too. When we were there, the new barn had fiddlers performing all through the day. There a few places to walk down to the river and some have a great place to swim in the summer. There is hiking near by and the whole highway is great for visiting with waterfalls, hiking and just relaxing. There are a number of campground hosts. They do not take reservations here but the campground fills up fast and is hard to get into in the summer. It is almost in the middle of this great highway and when the leaves are turning it is spectacular. We camped here in a 25 foot motor home and it was $19 a night and half for golden age. It is not open during the winter. All of these National Forest campgrounds are on a self-pay system so make sure you have the exact change to put into the envelope.
09/2006
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a National Forest Campground in the White Mountains with pay showers but no hookups and about 54 sites. It was about $18 a night but half with the golden age pass. It is a nice campground in a wooded section, the group campsites across the street are along the Mad River. The main road travels along to the Waterville Ski Area and is really a nice bike ride. We were there in October, there was only about one other camper there during the midweek but there is a ranger who stays there. Check closing dates many of the National Forests campgrounds are not open in the winter. We would camp here again. All of these National Forest campgrounds are on a self-pay system so make sure you have the exact change to put into the envelope.
09/2006
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is located in the White Mountains National Forest in New Hampshire. The campground has 28 sites in a wooded area for about $17 dollars a night but with the golden age pass $8 a night. It is on the Kancamagus Highway and not far from the village of Lincoln and the information and hiking center for this area. One can walk to the Pemigewasset River to fish. There are a number of National Forest campgrounds in this area. There are no showers or hookups available. It was Ok, just depends what type of camping you like. In the summer most of these campgrounds on this highway are filled by Friday afternoon and sometimes during the weeks. This is one of the National Forest campgrounds that are open in the winter for skiers. All of these National Forest campgrounds are on a self-pay system so make sure you have the exact change to put into the envelope.
10/2006
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is at the Fryeburg Fair which is one of the biggest fairs in New England, second to Springfield. Camping starts in 2007 for Sat September 29 through Sunday October 7. It is at the fair and they have over 3000 campers stay during the week. You can stay in the Trackside or Fairview areas. We stayed in the Fairview. This is bumper to bumper camping but with electricity and water, no bathrooms. There are showers though on the fairgrounds for pay. Considering it costs over $10 to park a camper in one of the parking lots around the fairgrounds, paying to camp for around $26 a night for water and electricity is not a bad price. The fairgrounds and everything going on is right there in walking distance. Tuesday is senior day for free entrance to get into the fair and they have nightly entertainment. It is a good time – you must stay at least two nights and most people stay for the week. This fair has lots to eat, great halls with homemade crafts, furniture, and events like the piglet run, skillet throw and the lumberman contests. It is different. The schools in this area are closed for this week; last year they had over 400,000 people attend the fair. Most campers that you see during this time even along the Kancamagus Highway are all heading to the Fryeburg Fair. It is also near North Conway, New Hampshire with all its discount shopping and great places to eat.
10/2006
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is a New Hampshire State Campground located in the beautiful Franconia Notch with 97 wooded sites. It is open year round with no facilities, but not staffed after Oct 9 through about May 20. There are bike trails, hiking, skiing, fishing, swimming etc near by. At the campground the bike trail goes by and there are a number of hiking trails starting from the campground or across the street. This is one of my favorite campgrounds. They do take reservations and in the summer and fall holiday weekends, you need reservations. It is situated at the bottom of two mountains in a notch, a creek runs by and when you have a fire and the full moon is out, the leaves are turning like it was this past Oct – it is beautiful. They do have what they call premium sites so they charge more for them – which is almost all of those at this campground during the summer until Labor Day. We had no problems getting a site during the week in October. You need to check out the sites though because some are not level and hard to get into. There are no hookups but they do have nice showers and also a check in hut with a fireplace and store. The rangers are always friendly here. The bike trail goes from above Cannon Mountain all the way down to the Flume. Riding South to North can be tough but the other direction is great. The ride from the campground to the Basin is not bad though. Great for hiking, waterfalls, swimming in some of the waterfalls and lakes and just a great camping experience. We camped here in a 25 foot motor home and it costs 19 a night.
07/2006
rating [ 9/10 ]
This park is huge (1,359 acres) and has really been updated since we camped here 20 years ago. It is beautiful with two beaches, a golf course, volleyball, softball etc. There is a proshop and a restaurant/bar at the golf course which you drive through to get to the 300 campsites in a woody or open area with electricity. There is a campstore that also sells food and ice cream – very reasonable. This is a great camping experience especially for families with children. The park is very well maintained and the drive along route 105 is beautiful. We even saw a moose on the highway on our way there. I don’t know the exact price because they have a special – stay in one provincial park for 6 nights and get the 7th free or stay in 3 provincial parks in New Brunswick for at least 1 night each and get your fourth provincial park free for 1 night. This was our free night!
07/2006
rating [ 6/10 ]
I do not know how many sites. Over 75 with electricity hookups. This campground is in a reasonable walking distance to Parlee Beach considered the best beach in New Brunswick with some of the warmest waters north of Virginia. This is a resort area with swimming, volleyball, some ports activities, restaurant and beautiful views. They have events planned at night at the beach like some local music talent – the group we listened too were excellent with their own CD’s. This park is also located in Shediac which is considered the lobster capitol of the world and downtown there is a big lobster that you can stand, climb etc for pictures. At night the town is lighted up on seagulls leading the way. Nice town! There is plenty of seafood but coming from New England the seafood is still cheaper then it was here because of the high prices in Canada. We had a nice site in the campground but everyone here is right next to each other – not much privacy. The bathrooms were fine but it is a crowded campground. I don’t think we will be back – not our type of camping.
07/2006
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is the second time we have camped at Murray Beach – the last time over ten years ago. They have added sites – now there are 118 sites and 57 sites have electricity hookups. The camping sites are in the open fields with great views of the beach and ocean. It is a great place to run and it is close to the bridge over to Prince Edward Island (close in miles but single, narrow road through villages so time must be added). Big Rigs can camp here. The Confederation Bridge can even be seen on a clear day. Sea Kayaking, sun bathing, and sunset watching are done here. It is a beautiful spot with a nice beach. Cape Jourimain Nature Park is worth a visit when in the area right next to the bridge.
07/2006
rating [ 9/10 ]
I am not quite sure how many campsites at New River Beach. Over 50 with electricity. The big beautiful beach is within walking distance. You have to keep track of the tides because it is on the Bay of Fundy with the biggest tides in the world. There are walks along the seashore and when the tide is out you can walk over to inlets with nature trails and islands. The sand is good and a great place to run. The park at the beach has a playground, restaurant, store, volleyball courts. The campsites are private but need to be check out to make sure you are level. Big rigs might have some problems here. It is a relaxing place and the employees at check in were friendly and very helpful. Plan to go back to this park!
07/2006
rating [ 10/10 ]
On the northern, eastern acadian shore of New Brunswick on the river and bay with the warmest waters north of Virginia. This is a beautiful park with a number of campgrounds. South Kouchibouguac Campground has 311 sites and 46 with electricity, Cote-a-Fabien Campground has 32 first come first serve sites but no services and there is a number of canoeing campgrounds and backcountry sites all over the Park. South K takes reservations and the others are first come first serve. As in all Canadian Parks they have kitchen shelters for anyone to use especially the tenters when it is raining. These shelters have sinks, stoves, firepits, tables and a place to wash dishes – great for large groups. There are beaches for swimming, alot of hiking trails and there are great bike trails all over the park leading out from the campground. This summer we had to watch out for the jellyfish when swimming but on the pathway to Kelly’s Beach the bridge was a great place to stand and watch all the jellyfish swim by. They were beautiful. There are nightly programs (English & French), daily walks and one can rent bikes, boats etc. It is a great campground in a beautiful area. It is near the Irving eco-center with its long boardwalk going over the dunes (less than an hour away) – a must see. The only negative thing which I will repeat here from my Fundy assessment is that -the Canadian (National Parks) now charge for not only the campground but to get into the park (they have gone from no charge, to $5 per carload to a daily rate which I think is high $8 per adult per day). If you have children who are over 16 they are charged the adult rate per day. So, for the 4 of us the camping rate was over 30 with w/e/s and then a daily rate of 32 dollars on top of that plus the $11 reservation fee. If you are planning to stay for a few days which most campers do the fees add up. At least the US National Parks the rate charged is for everyone in the car and it is for 5 days or even more in some parks.
07/2006
rating [ 10/10 ]
I am not sure of the number of sites in Fundy but the serviced area at Headquarters had almost 50 sites. Fundy is a great place to hike, swim, ocean touring, play golf, tennis, and watch the biggest tides come in and out of the Bay of Fundy. There are three family campgrounds and two have electricity. Headquarters is the only one with electricity, water and sewers and the best view of the tides and within walking distance to Alma the golf course, visitor center etc, but the others have their advantages check out their web site – Chignecto has large wooded sites with some electricity but nice bike trails; Point Wolfe has few sites but they are open, quiet with swimming and great views. There are also a number of back country sites and primitive areas available. They have ranger programs every night alternating nightly in English or French and walks led by the rangers during the day. We have camped and visited Fundy over the last 40 years more than 5 times and love it. It is very near Hopewell Rocks which is a must see! The only negative thing is that Canada (National Parks) now charge for not only the campground but to get into the park – a daily rate which I think is high $8 per adult per day. If you have children who are over 16 they are charged the adult rate per day. So, for the 4 of us the camping rate was over 30 with w/e/s and then a daily rate of 32 dollars on top of that plus the $11 reservation. If you are planning to stay for a few days which most campers do the fees add up. At least the US National Parks the rate charged is for everyone in the car and it is for 5 days or even more in some parks.
07/2006
rating [ 7/10 ]
Located 5 miles south of Presque Isle with over 700 acres. Maine’s first state park. There are 30 sites in the woods with water and a washroom near the first sites. There is no electricity. The bathrooms have been redone. Very interesting – there are at least 7 private bathrooms with a shower stall and wash basin (great for families with small children). Very clean. There is a place to swim on a fresh water lake with a place to put in a boat. A quiet spot to camp with privacy in the woods and the drive on route 1 from Presque Isle or Houlton to get there is beautiful. The best part about this campground is that they have one of the nicest group of rangers working there that greet you at the entrance and offered all sorts of help and assistance. They drove around during the night and day to see if anyone needed help. There is a playground and 3 hiking trails up Quaggy Jo Mountain, which in the winter some of them are used as cross county trails.
07/2006
rating [ 7/10 ]
Some great tent sites and there are some RV sites on the Bay. There is no electricity and most of the camping areas have pit toilets and water but the entrance of the campground has a nice washroom with showers. Great for hikes and for clamming when the biggest tides of the Bay of Fundy go out!
07/2006
rating [ 8/10 ]
A great Maine State Park ( no electricity ). It is on Frenchman’s Bay and some of the sites have water views but there are hiking trails all along the edge of the Bay. Where else can you have lobsters delivered by a local fisherman delivered to your site for $6.
07/2006
rating [ 8/10 ]
Still one of my favorite Maine State Parks Campgrounds. Very scenic, quiet, lots of hiking and near Camden for shopping and the ocean. There are 107 campsites and they are planning within the next year to put in electricity on some of their sites. I don’t know if I am for that or not. It is a great campground as it is without the noise that sometimes electricity brings. Great place to retire!
08/2005
rating [ 8/10 ]
I really dont want anyone to know about this campground because you can usually drive up and get a site, but it is a gem with no services. This is a state campground for RVs only in a parking lot next to a beach looking out on the Atlantic Ocean, and an inlet where one can canoe. Some sites lookout on to the breachway where one can watch the fishermen and the other sites are in rows in the back. You can ride your bike around this area and there are also restaurants close by for seafood. There are only 75 sites here with a bathroom but no showers. It is on the beach and looking out to Block Island Sound. It is beautiful and peaceful. There are no reservations just first come first serve and the maximum stay is one week. The season runs from April 15 to Oct 31 and rates are with no services $14 for residents and $20 for non-residents with extra charges for additional cars. This campground is south of route 1 in southern RI in the town of Charlestown. For those with tents or if you want more services there is another RI State Park that offers camping and swimming -Burlington State Park just north of route1 in the same area.
08/2004
rating [ 8/10 ]
Quechee State Park is located in the Quechee Gorge Area. There are 611 acres there and the campground is next to the gorge which has a 200 foot drop. There are hiking trails down the gorge, where one can jump in for a swim at your own risk. It is beautiful. One can stand on the RT 4 and look down the gorge. There is also a Glass Blowing Mill and Pottery Shop at the top of the gorge (highly rated). We always stop here when camping for a night or two. Reservations can be made for 2 or more nights. Easy to get into on a first come first serve during the week, but we have found it becoming more difficult in the summer to get a site on a weekend without a reservation. Quechee is near Woodstock, Vt a nice town to visit. It is also near North Hartland Lake for swimming and fishing, Billings Farm Museum, the VINS Nature Center and within driving distance of the Coolidge Homestead (worth a visit). It is a beautiful and peaceful area but can become congested in the summer.
10/2005
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is a New Hampshire State Park situated in the beautiful Franconia Notch. The mountains are above and the creek runs through it. Some of the sites are small but there are others in the meadow that big rigs can camp in. There are coin operated showers that are very hot and clean. The house at the entrance has a fireplace with a fire going, where anyone can gather, sit, read, talk and enjoy. When it rains and it is cold, it gets quite crowded The bike trails go through this park down to the flume and up passed Cannon Mt. They are great. One can visit the Old Man in the Mt (which is not there anymore), the basin, flume etc. Lots of hiking even from the campground. There is also swimming available down the road at Echo Lake. There are some sites right on the creek. One should check out their site - some areas are hard for a big camper to get around and when it is muddy it can be difficult. The loop to the right would be better for large campers. The only problem with this campground now is that they started taking reservations the last three years and now 88 of the sites are by reservation only. They have also decided in the New Hampshire State Parks to select some premium sites that cost $5 more from June 17 to Labor Day. So now you pay to make the reservation and then pay more for the premium site and it seems that most of them are premium. I think I liked it better when it was first come first serve, except to drive that distance and not get a site was a problem too. We had a beautiful site right on the creek and we rode the bike trails all over. The small town near by also has bike trails that head out to the White Mt National Forest. This campground looks out and up at the mountains all around it - it is beautiful especially in the fall. Great place. For those who can not live without utilities the State Park at Cannon Mt, just about a mile away has a few sites with electricity, swimming and views of the mountain - even during the winter months for those who snowmobile and ski.
07/2004
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is another great Maine State Park way up north on Moosehead Lake. The sites were wooded and many right on the water. We had a wooded site and it is quite private and peaceful. There are hot showers but no utilities. You can boat, fish, swim, hike and see a lot of wildlife. Just outside the park we saw a number of moose on different days. Be careful though -they are big and will be protective especially the mothers with their young. It gets very dark at night even in August, if you are in a wooded campsite, so bring flashlights. It is a beautiful area of Maine and the campground is great.
09/2005
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is one of my favorite Maine State Parks. The campsites (62) are wooded and some in an open area. There are hot showers but no utilities. It is on Frenchman's Bay across from Mt. Desert Island. The views are beautiful and some sites look out to the Bay and all are in walking distance. Some of the sites slope down hill, so one needs to check out the sites but most are fine. Most sites are backins. There are hiking trails around the park, a boating and dock section, picnic area and a swimming beach just down the road. The sunsets are beautiful here. If you go down to the docks in the early evening you might be able to buy clams and lobsters right from the fishermen just coming in from their day's catch. This park is in a busy area in the summer between Ellsworth (ten minutes away) and Bar Harbor (20 minutes away) and Acadia National Park (20 minutes). Yet, if you stay here it is peaceful, beautiful and very relaxing. It is also close to the other Acadia (Schoodic P). It is only open between the end of May and about October 15. You can make reservations for 2 or more nights on weekends and 1 or more nights from Sunday through Thursday. There is a playground in the picnic area. Nice campground!
06/2004
rating [ 9/10 ]
This campground is close to Plymouth and near the Cape. It is big with many loops all over the park in a beautiful natural setting. Some campsites are on one of the sixteen ponds, yet other sites are near the ponds but in a forest with pitch pine and scrub pine. The Charge Pond area has the biggest sites with not much shade, where you can walk down to a pond for swimming. Some of the other loops have sites right on the water with a lot more shade. The showers and restrooms were clean. This state forest has 15 miles of paved bike trails which are close to all the campground loops and 13 miles of hiking and 35 miles of equestrian trails. They even have one loop in the Charge Pond area that is only for those camping with horses. See the website for more information. This is a nice campground but there are times on holiday weekends where the groups camping together in the Charge Pond area can get rowdy (July 4). It is still better than it was 15 years ago. Yet, the Charge Pond area is still one of our favorite areas and is a great place for a family.
09/2005
rating [ 9/10 ]
This state park is just over the Sagamore Bridge at the entrance to the Cape. It is a nice campground, with the 285 sites set in pine and scrub oak. It is only a bike ride away from the bike path along the Cape Cod Canal. Nice ride. At the canal you can watch the boats travel up and down the canal to get to Boston or points north or points south. Sandwich is a nice little town on the Cape that is not as crowded in the summer like the rest of the Cape. This is a good campground to stay at to visit most of the Cape especially if you plan to take the ferries in Falmouth. There are a lot of campsites at this park but our site was private and very quiet. They now take reservations here.
07/2005
rating [ 9/10 ]
Nickerson State Park is in the middle of Cape Cod - a great place to stay for a couple of days to tour this area. There are showers but there are also 8 fresh water ponds for swimming. There is a swimming area within the park that you can drive to but from many of the camping loops a walk down a hill is needed to find your own private little area. There are seven loops with 420 campsites in a pine/oak forests. The first 4 areas are close to the entrance which is good because this park has over 1900 acres. We have stayed here many times and have camped in all the loops. They all have their pros and cons. There was a storm this past winter so they closed the park but will open up again late in May. Loop 7 will remain closed for the season. One of the greatest things about this park is that there are paved bike trails that go all over and then hook up at the entrance of the park to the Cape Cod Rail Trail. This trail has wonderful paved trails that go up and down the Cape. There are trails all over the Cape. There are even restaurants that have set up along the trail to offer food and water in some areas. The trails are safe for children of all ages. This park is hard to get into without reservations in the summer because of all the great Cape beaches near it and the National Seashore. There are ranger programs in the park in the summer and a newletter with all the National Seashore Activities, trails, hikes and talks can be picked up at the National Park visitor center which is close. Many families stay for at least a week and some for the max of 14 days. Others return every year for family vacations. Enjoy!
09/2004
rating [ 9/10 ]
Mount Blue State Park is another state campground that reservations can be made for two nights on weekends and one night Sunday through Thursday. This campground is up a mountain with a beautiful beach that the kids will love. It is in western Maine and the sites are very private with a lot of trees between sites. We have camped here about 5 times in the last twenty-five years. Some times when it is not crowded it is so dark and scary. We have never made reservations but on some holiday weekends you might need too. You can hike, swim, mountain bike, horseback rid, ATV riding, boat, fish and picnic here. There are ranger led talks on weekends in the summer. Nice and cool in the summer. Beautiful spot. Nice spot to camp in the fall for the fall colors. Enjoy! There are no electric or water sites though.
10/2004
rating [ 10/10 ]
This is 1 of 2 campgrounds in Acadia National Park. Blackwoods is located off the loop road near Bar Harbor and it is required to have reservations now from May 1 to mid Sept. You can take the chance and pull up and be placed on a wait list but you might have to move everyday. You have a better chance of getting in-in the Spring and Fall unless you make a reservation. There are no showers in the campground but some very close by. This is a great campground. We have camped here maybe 15 times in the last twenty-five years, usually for 5 or more days and sometimes for two weeks at a time. Now they have the Island Shuttle Bus which comes to the campground, which is free (thanks to LL Bean) to take you to different sections of the park and to Bar Harbor, Northwest Harbor and Southwest Harbor. Southwest Harbor is where the other campground Seawall is. Very pretty and first come first serve (only open May to early September). There is so much to do in Acadia: dirt bike trails on the carriage roads, hiking, ranger talks and hikes, beaches, tours out to some of the islands and a visit to Bar Harbor with its great shops and nice walk along the seashore. There are ranger talks at night with slideshows at the campground. To drive the loop you need to buy a pass for your car for $20 which is good for seven days. Lots to see and do and it is beautiful. Lots of wildlife. Visit the Acadia National Park site for more information. The campground is huge with two loops. The second loop where many of the RV's are: the sites are close but many are pull throughs. RV's can be placed in any loop though. Some of the upper loops have huge sites. You need to check your site out because one time we could not get into our site because it was too small and the road was muddy but that was only once in fifteen times. We love this campground even though it does not have showers. There are pay showers right outside the campground gate. There are hiking trails right from the campground. One of them goes down to a rocky cliff way above the ocean where you can sit and read and enjoy the day. (Be careful with small children though because at the rocky edge you can slip.) We have hiked this trail when our children were 2 and when they were 20: you just need to be careful. The last time we camped at Blackwoods we did encounter a problem with RV's running their generators for a long period of time in the morning, during the afternoon and at night. It was so bad that when one camper finally turned theirs off after 2 hours everyone around them cheered, clapped and hooted. This has never happened before when we camped here but I don't believe they have generator hours like some other National Park campgrounds do, also it was in October and not in the summer when it is warmer. Trips to Northwest Harbor are fun because you can go down to the boats coming in and purchase clams and lobsters right off the boat. A ride over to the Schoodic Peninsula on the mainland is a good days trip. It is part of Acadia National Park and the views are outstanding. Blackwoods campground had different rates depending on the season. The basic season runs from May 1 to October 31, then the bathrooms are shut down, but it is open year round. Check this out because this year they closed October 31, 2005 until May 2006 to make repairs in the campground. It is a great place and the kids will love all the activities. Ours loved the drive up the mountain at night to view the stars and the flashlight walks through some of the trails. There is a paper of the weekly walks, talks, activities, etc., at the visitor center which you can pick up. There is a pond for swimming and a few beaches around the island. I do not know anyone that has not fallen in love with Acadia National Park. It is a wonderful place to camp and visit.
09/2005
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is one of the Maine State Park campgrounds which can be reserved for 2 or more nights on weekends and 1 or more on Sunday through Thursday (you don't really need reservations except for the summer and holiday weekends). This is a beautiful park that we have camped at many times on our way up the Maine coast heading to Canada or for an extended stay. It is on the coast - sites should be checked because some are for tents only but they are beautiful with water view. There are some sites for RV's in an open area and also in a secluded area that you need to backin and some are drive through right on the coast. The tent sites and some of the RV sites are some of the best I have ever seen on the rocky coast of Maine. There are 24 foot tides here heading up through the Bay of Fundy. One can go hiking, clamming or touring. Quoddy Head is near by and a visit to Roosevelt-Campobello Island is a must. Check passport requirements that will be needed within a year if you decide to cross over to Canada. The shores are rocky and beautiful with alot of wildlife. This is one of our favorite campgrounds and is not crowded like some of the other State Parks because it is on the Canadian border.
09/2004
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is one of the Maine State Park campgrounds which can be reserved for 2 or more nights on weekends and 1 or more on Sunday through Thursday. There are some beautiful sites in the woods but there are some sites in the meadow for big rigs. This campground is up high over Camden which is a beautiful seaside community with great little shops. The park has a toll road and hiking trails to the top of Mt. Battle for panoramic views of the harbor. It also has private picnic sites and hiking trails down the hill from the campground that you can walk too with some beautiful views of the bay. We have camped here many times in the last twenty-five years as we head up the coast of Maine going to Acadia National Park or on our way to Canada. The rangers are very nice. It's a good place to stay awhile to visit along the coast or just for a one night stopover. We like the first loop on the right. Great campground and adorable town. The library in town should be seen - part of it is built underground and they do have computer access there. Don't miss the Oreo cows in a pasture near town pass the library. In the Fall they gave us a discounted rate.
09/2005
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is another National Forest campground in the White Mountains. I love this campground. The sites are huge and private with a lot of tall trees. There is a river that runs in the back of the campground and one can walk to it (very close to some sites)and swim in the summer. Big groups are welcome here and it is still very quiet. It is on the Kancamagus Highway with river swimming, hiking and beauty. One can drive to the Old Man in the Mountain (which is not there anymore) or to North Conway for shopping and food in less than an hour. The golden age pass is accepted here with 50% off camping fees. They were not accepting reservations and generally you don't need them except for some busy weekends in the summer. This might change since there are a number of National Forests Campgrounds in this area that are taking reservations now so check online at the National Forest website.
09/2005
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is an excellent campground if you like one with no showers, electric and sewers. It is in the White Mountain Natinal Forest so it is beautiful and some sites are able to see part of Mount Washington. You can hear the water running down the mountain from some sites and others are on a cliff overlooking the river depending on the season whether you can see it. There are very private sites and others that are in a meadow which can handle big rigs with great views of the mountains. This campground is used by a lot of campers that hike Mt. Washington and other mountains in the area.
09/2005
rating [ 10/10 ]
I agree with the previous positive review. This is an excellent campground with an ocean breeze. Clamming is near by and one can ride a bike down to the small fishing village Galilee to buy clams and lobsters, go to the beach or take the ferry over to Block Island. It is almost impossible to get a reservation for this park in June, July and August. Many beaches near by. There are some sites not taken but call first. In May, the early part of June, September, and October you can find a site with no reservations during the week and some weekends. I would still call first to see how many sites are available. There is a big RV area with sewers that has an open look that looks out over an inlet (very pretty) but the other camping loop is private with trees and with electricity and water. There are tennis courts available and playing fields. Out of state residents pay $35 dollars for e,w and s and $25 for just w and e. If you can get in,it is a beautiful state campground.
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