219095 User submitted reviews online!!
06/2014
rating [ 5/10 ]
This park is not far from Portland, Oregon or the scenic attractions of the Columbia Gorge. It lies along the designated Wild and Scenic Sandy River in an extensive stand of old growth forest. The physical setting is beautiful and there are 12 miles of trails for exploring the forest and river banks. Be aware that the access road in and out of the park is very steep! Those pulling trailers need to use low gear and the road is not suitable for large RVs. There are no water, electric or sewer hook-ups in the park, nor is there a dump station. There are flush toilets and free hot showers. Although we thought the setting was beautiful and peaceful, we felt the price was steep for what you get. Campsites are $22 a night and there is a $5 entry fee just to get into the park. That made our one night stay $27 for what was basically a pretty primitive camp site. Also, there are no pets allowed in the park so this campground is not suitable for those with a pet. This campground is best suited to those camping in tents, camper vans, truck campers, or small trailers. It would appeal to families as there are plenty of trails for kids to explore and also some playgrounds and grassy fields for baseball games and the like. We'd probably not stay here again but look for something along the Gorge instead.
05/2014
rating [ 9/10 ]
We were on our way home and just wanted to stop to use the dump station, but then decided to see if we could stay the night and boy am I glad we did. This park is a gem! Because the park was full, staff had opened an overflow area, which was in one of the group sites. We had a huge, level, paved, private site with electricity and water amid the tall evergreens. Very restful! The main camping loops are in the woods and are thoughtfully laid out to provide good privacy. Some have electricity and water and some have no utilities, but they all looked pretty nice. There are also 8 walk-in sites for tent campers and 3 hiker/biker sites. You can also rent a nice looking cabin or reserve one of the three well laid-out group sites. An extensive network of trails, including one ADA accessible, leads to the banks of the Skagit River where there is good fishing in season and eagle watching in the winter. Throughout the park, there are excellent interpretive signs explaining the native flora and fauna. Several children's playgrounds will keep the kids happy. We also liked the open meadow down near the river where elk are sometimes seen. We'd also like to give praise to the super volunteers staffing the entrance station. Interacting with them was a pleasant change from what we've experienced lately at most of the Washington State parks wherein staff and volunteers have seemed indifferent at best. I would highly recommend this park and we would definitely stay here again.
05/2014
rating [ 5/10 ]
This park got great reviews in two of our camping guide books, so we decided to give it a try, but were somewhat disappointed. On the plus side, the park is pretty, nestled along the shore of Alta Lake with some sites in the pines and some in more open, and exposed areas closer to the lake. There are three loops. Loop 1 is in the woods with a variety of site sizes. It's pretty and there is some privacy, but you have to walk a ways to the lake. Loop 3 is also in the woods and has some pretty sites, but most are very small and suitable only for tent campers. Loop 2 is more open and down near the lake with some sites being right on the shoreline. There is not much privacy in this loop and the access road is narrow with tight corners. Some of the sites here are large and some are quite small. Most of these sites would be very hot in the summer, but of course you could always cool off with a swim in the lake! This loop also has some electric/water hook-up sites in what is basically a parking lot, but if you're OK with that you would have some views of the lake. On the negative side, this park now uses Washington State Parks' new variable pricing structure with different fees for Popular, Basic ,and Economy sites which you have to sort out for yourself. Also, there is no way to know which sites are available for the night except by copying down the list of open sites posted at the unstaffed entrance station, then drive to pick out your site and then walk or drive all the way back to the entrance station to put your fee in the drop-box. Why not have a drop box in each loop? Washington State Parks are increasingly understaffed with systems that are not designed for the ease of the camper. This campground has flush toilets and coin-op showers. The showers were clean but definitely showing their age. The lake is pretty, but there are lots of summer homes lining the far shore that detracts from the natural beauty in my opinion. Fishing is good judging by the success of the folks in our neighboring campsite.
05/2014
rating [ 6/10 ]
We've stayed at this park several times when visiting eastern Washington. Sadly, our experiences here have been getting poorer rather than better. Prices keep going up and service keeps going down. This park, like other Washington State Parks, now has a variable pricing system. You may choose a Popular, Basic, or Economy site and each of these types may or may not have hook-ups, resulting in several different price options. Unless you're lucky and find the entrance station staffed when you arrive, you'll have to sort out the fee structure on your own. We've very rarely found the entry station staffed when we've camped here, whether it's been in the shoulder or the high season, and this time was no exception. Another irritating thing is that the park does not mark the reserved sites in any way. They do post a list at the entry station of the sites that have incoming reservations for that night. There is also a list of all the campsite numbers in each loop and the ones that are not available for that night are crossed out. You must note all these site numbers and then drive around and choose an open one. Heaven help you if you make an error and take a site that's actually reserved. Why the staff can't put "Reserved" signs on the reserved sites like they do at so many other campgrounds baffles me. Chalk it up to budget cuts. You also now need a code to use the dump station. If you don't know the code, you pay $5 to dump. After we'd been settled in for awhile and I'd dropped our fee in the drop box back up at the entrance station, a staff person came by to give us paperwork to put on our dashboard. I asked about the code for the dump station and she said I could get it from her. What was it, I asked. She couldn't remember, but if I'd come to office later she'd give it to me. Another trek to the entrance station. This park is pleasant in many ways, with large grassy sites and its proximity to town and other attractions in the area. The natural wetlands portion of the park is well worth a visit and if you like to bicycle there is access to Wenatchee's great bicycle trail system. We'd probably camp here again, but Washington's park system is getting less and less camper friendly and more and more bureaucratic so I really can't say this is one of my favorite parks anymore.
10/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
There are lots of things to do at this park: salt water fishing, exploring the old gun emplacements and fortifications, touring lighthouse, beachcombing, etc. Additionally, if you want to take a day trip to Port Townsend, the ferry is just steps away from the campground. We were surprised to find all the electrical/water hookups taken in Oct. even though we came in early in the afternoon on Friday. (Although it was a beautiful sunny weekend, so that may have accounted for it.). We had to make do with a non-hook-up site for two nights before a hook-up site opened up for us to use on our last night. The campground was full by around dinner time on Friday night. This park does not take reservations so it pays to get here early and/or come during the middle of the week, especially in the summer or on mild days during other seasons. The campground at Fort Casey is right down at sea level. Quite a few of the sites have great views of Admiralty Inlet and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. In some sites, if the weather is inclement with wind blowing off the water, and/or in high tides, be prepared to get salt spray on your rig! You also get a front row seat to watch the Coupeville to Port Townsend Ferry come in and out. Thankfully, the ferry only sounds its very loud horn during foggy weather! All in all this is a great place to camp if you enjoy outdoor activities and need only the basics. There is no dump station. The nearest place we found to dump our tanks was at Deception Pass State Park on the north end of Whidbey Island. The rate quoted is what we paid for a non-hook-up site with a low income senior pass. Regular rates are $22 (or $28 for an electric/water site).
04/2013
rating [ 6/10 ]
Our second time at this park. You don't have a lot of options in Winnemucca, and this is certainly an acceptable place to stay. As has been commented on by other reviewers, there are a lot of permanent residents living in older, rather run-down trailers, but in general the park is well managed and maintained. It looked like management was making improvements to some of the facilities. The bathrooms and showers are older but clean and serviceable. The office staff is friendly and helpful. We'd stay here again.
03/2013
rating [ 4/10 ]
This is a BLM campground along the shores of Walker Lake just north of the town of Hawthorne. Not much to offer here. No potable water and no hook-ups of any sort. No flush toilets and no showers. The women's outhouse was disgustingly dirty. The pads are broken asphalt and gravel. Nice views of the lake and easy access off the highway, other than that and the very inexpensive fees, there's not much to write home about. Looks like the sort of place that would be popular with the local crowd in the summer for fishing, boating, jet-skiing, etc. Our cost reflects the fact that this is a Federal campground and we have the Senior Access pass. Regular fee would be $6.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park looks very basic as you drive into it and doesn't have a lot of amenities, but don't let that put you off. The lady who checked us in came out from the office to greet us as we drove in and was very cheerful and welcoming. She escorted us to our spot and made sure we were settled in OK. The sites are gravel and set up a little unusually. Rigs are parked first in one row and then rigs are parked in a row behind the first row. Rigs in the first row can drive out frontwards, but those in the row behind must back out unless the one in front has departed. The bathrooms are unisex and there are just two of them, but they are spotlessly clean and attractive. It appeared that they had been very recently remodeled. Each restroom has a toilet, sink and very large tiled shower. WiFi worked well. This was a very good deal for the price and we would definitely stay here again.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is not the kind of park we usually look for, but we had to have some repairs done on our tow vehicle and it was very convenient to where we had the work done. This park is mostly for snowbirds in big rigs who spend the winter in St. George. The park offers lots of amenities and there are many organized activities during the winter. Although we were by far the smallest, most modest rig in the park the one night we stayed, the lady at the reception desk was just as friendly, helpful and courteous to us as if we'd been in a big gold-plated rig. She gave us maps with lots of local information should we decide to stay longer. The sites in the section where we stayed are all back in gravel sites. You park your rig on one side of a small concrete patio and park your vehicle on the other side of it. Everything was very clean and tidy and it was quiet at night. Bathrooms and showers were a bit of a trek from where we were parked. All sorts of shopping and dining options are right nearby. This makes for a convenient overnight stop if traveling up or down I-15 as it's very easily accessed from the freeway, but far enough off of it to be quiet at night.
03/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
We had hoped to stay at one of the campgrounds inside Zion National Park, but with kids on spring break, they were both full. This park made for a good, but considerably more expensive, alternative. One nice thing about this park is that the free Springdale shuttle stops right in front of the park and takes you to the Zion visitors center where you can then connect to the park shuttle bus. On the plus side, we had a lovely site (electric and water, but no sewer) right by the river and the views from our trailer were great. On the minus side, the WiFi was pretty inadequate. All the staff could say when we weren't able to connect was that too many people were trying to access the network at the same time. Maybe an upgrade to their system would be a good idea? You have to go to the check-in desk at the motel to get tokens for the showers. Not a big deal. I found the showers and bathrooms to be in pretty good working order and level of cleanliness, but I avoided using them at really busy times. As is the case with any popular location, using the facilities at off hours is the way to go. We got up early every day and took the shuttle to the park, hiked and went sight-seeing before the crowds converged and then came back to our campsite in the afternoon to relax and take showers. The sites here are quite close together so I really recommend the sites along the river if you can do without a sewer connection as they seem a little more peaceful.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
We stayed here for three nights while seeing all the attractions in the area including Virginia City, Carson City and the Nevada State Museum, the little town of Genoa and more. There were mostly permanent residents in the park at this time of year with just a scattering of travelers coming and going. The park is very tidy and well laid out and offers many amenities. The restrooms and showers were particularly clean and spacious! Didn't notice much in the way of noise, even from the nearby highway. Wi-Fi worked well. This would be a hot place to stay in the summer as most of the trees between the sites are not yet mature enough to provide any shade, but there is a pool available for cooling off on those hot summer days. We would definitely stay here again.
03/2013
rating [ 4/10 ]
I wrote the last review of this park, and there's not much new to say about it. It's still rough around the edges, but quiet and safe and peaceful. The roads into and out of the park are dirt and pretty bumpy. The proprietors are very nice people and friendly and accommodating. The WiFi worked adequately and you can't beat the price. Honey Lake is definitely not a destination park, but good for an overnight stop.
03/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a beautiful state park set in an open desert environment. There are no hook-ups, but water is available for filling your fresh water tank and there are flush toilets and showers available as well as a dump station. The view from our campsite out across the fragrant sagebrush and beyond to the mountains in the distance was beautiful. There is very little shade available so this campground would be quite hot in the summer. The bathrooms and showers are clean, but very basic. The water in the shower was not very warm and you have to keep pushing a button to keep the stream of water flowing - an awkward arrangement. It was a very quiet, pretty and peaceful place to camp while we explored the surrounding area. Don't miss Virginia City, an easy day trip from the park. We'd definitely stay here again!
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is convenient to I-5, but far enough off the highway to be quiet at night. It's a very clean park and well maintained. The sites are gravel and each one has a little fence enclosure around a paved patio with a small picnic table and chairs. The fences, while not providing visual privacy, do give you a nice sense of separation from your neighbor. Wi-Fi was very fast. We would definitely stay again at this well-run, attractive park.
03/2013
rating [ 6/10 ]
Just because an RV park has the word "resort" in its name doesn't necessarily make it one. We came in after the office was closed and all there was to guide us was a note on the door to pick a spot near the office and pay in the morning. There was no indication as to what the fee would be or any other information. The only signs of life were two other rigs and a couple of park models. A gentleman came out from one of the rigs and asked if we needed help and when we said we just wanted to stay for the night he merely informed us to check the water supply before we picked a spot because the water had been turned off for the winter in some of the spaces. We later learned that this man was the on-site off-hours host! So much for a nice helpful welcome. Because the office was closed we had no way to access the restrooms or showers. In the morning a lady finally showed up at the office and when I mentioned the restrooms/shower dilemma, she said that they really weren't open for the season yet and they'd provided a sani-can by the pool building for customers to use! Sani-cans aren't exactly the sort of facilities that I think of when I think of a resort. I understand that it wasn't high season, but I feel an RV park should provide its advertised services if it's open to customers. Otherwise, don't be open at all. The sites by the office are completely out in the open with no privacy between them. The pads consist of narrow strips of gravel between the overall surrounding area of grass. Internet access is through Tengo-net and there is an additional fee for that. All in all, I think this could be a nice resort, especially in the summer, but it seems poorly managed. We got the impression that what limited staff there was didn't really care very much about the quality of their service. We probably wouldn't stay here again.
03/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This county campground is extremely popular in the summer, when reservations are highly recommended. During the off season it is quiet and peaceful. There are two camping areas. An upper area (where we stayed)offers spacious, but not at all private, electric/water hookup sites with fantastic views of the Juan de Fuca Straits. The lower campground offers more primitive sites amid tall evergreen trees. These sites have more privacy and easy access to some interesting tide pools. There are flush toilets and showers, but given the number of campsites and the popularity of the campground, it would be nice if there were more showers available. Be advised that this is a no-alcohol campground. Signs were prominently displayed that no alcoholic beverages are allowed.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
We spent three nights here and really enjoyed our stay. The park appears to have undergone significant improvements since the last time we checked it out. We opted for a back-in site with full hook-ups in an open area with views across the salt water to Port Townsend. The old fortifications and gun emplacements make for fascinating exploring. There are also lots of good biking and hiking trails in the park and it's just a relatively short drive into Port Townsend. We would definitely stay here again. The rate quoted is with our Washington state senior discount off-season pass - a great deal!
09/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
Are the facilities a little old and makeshift? Yes. Are the electrical hook-ups weird? Yes. In spite of that we really enjoyed our two nights at this municipal campground right in the heart of Nelson. This campground is operated by a youth services agency now and all of the proceeds from the campground fees go to support its programs. The campground is definitely dated and yet possesses a considerable amount of charm. One of the best things about it is that it's right in the middle of a lovely older neighborhood and within walking distance to the historic downtown area of Nelson. We had a back in, full hook up site. The water and electrical connections are behind a cement retaining wall and a bit awkward to reach. Be sure you back in far enough that your electrical cord reaches the outlet, which is only 15 amps and requires that you use either an adapter and/or an extension cord. There are lots of big trees for shade. A community pavilion area adjoining the office offers washing machines and dryers, a service sink, tables and benches, a microwave and electric teapot. Nice amenities for tent campers. The Wi-Fi was surprisingly good and the campground hosts gave top-notch friendly service. Although this campground is a bit on the funky side we would definitely stay here again. Nelson is an interesting town and this campground makes the best base for seeing it.
09/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
This Provincial Park is set on a long thin spit of land that juts out into Lake Osoyoos. It's a very scenic and popular park and even on the last day of September we just managed to snag one of the last available spots when we pulled in. Late arrivals were out of luck. Many of the sites are lake side sites with gorgeous views of Lake Osoyoos, the surrounding hills and the city of Osoyoos in the distance. There is a day use area and an off leash dog area along one section of the shoreline. There's also a lovely nature walk through a marsh area that shouldn't be missed. Swimming, fishing and boating are all popular pastimes here. The sites themselves are spacious and fairly private with picnic tables and fire pits. Mature willows and pine trees provide shade. I would give this park a higher rating, maybe a 9 or even a 10, if only it had better services, especially considering the $30 fee. There are no hook-ups, no showers and no dump station. The water faucets had "boil for two minutes" warning signs on them. I think this would be a very noisy and crowded campground in the summer, but our stay here at the end of September was quiet and peaceful. We would stay here again.
09/2012
rating [ 5/10 ]
This is just a basic forested campground near the east shore of Kootenay Lake approximately 40 km north of Creston and 19 km south of Crawford Bay on Highway 3A. Since it was a Provincial Park I expected more amenities (like a State Park) but it reminded me more of a National Forest Service campground like you would find in the States. The sites are large and fairly level with picnic tables and fire pits. There are vault toilets and no other "facilities". A water tap near the entrance had a sign stating that the water was not treated and could not be guaranteed safe to drink so we didn't use it. Although the campground sits on the opposite side of the road from the lake shore, there is a short trail that takes you down to a nice picnic area on the shore itself. While there's nothing fancy about this park, it was clean and peaceful and we'd probably use it again although the price seemed high for what you get.
09/2012
rating [ 6/10 ]
While I liked this park, I wouldn't rate it as high as the previous reviewers have. On the plus side it has a lot of charm in an old-fashioned campground sort of way. There are a variety of camping options from full-service 50 amp sites to bare bones tent sites. Some of the RV sites are in a forested setting which reminded me of a state or forest service campground. Other sites are out in the open and have a view of the small lake the resort is named for. There is also one cabin for rent as well as a tepee and a tent cabin. There's lots for families to do here - swimming in the lake, kayaks for rent, a mini-golf course, horseshoes, games to check out, etc. The Wi-Fi was pretty good. On the minus side I found things a bit rough around the edges. Although the restrooms were clean enough, I don't think anyone on the staff checked them the entire time we were there (2 nights) because the one I used still had the same scraps of stray toilet paper on the floor on the last morning as it did on the night we checked in. The bathhouse is set up nicely though with individual unisex rooms that have a toilet, sink and shower. The heated floors are nice but the showers are not so nice. They have a push button flow control and you get 10 seconds (I counted) of hot water and then you have to push the button again to get more water. Seems weird to pay to take a navy shower when I could do that in my own rig. The resort adjoins a farm and we sometimes got some farm smells, but it really wasn't anything offensive. The wild vineyard is really just a little patch of grape vines that is not being tended and is getting overgrown with weeds. At one time there was deer fencing surrounding it, but the fencing has fallen down in places and so although it's available as an off leash area be aware that it is not truly enclosed. The train noise was rather loud but fortunately the trains don't seem to run too frequently. Although it's not perfect we enjoyed our stay here and would use this campground again.
09/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a great old fashioned sort of campground set along the shores of Diablo Lake in North Cascades National Park. There are no hook-ups and the pads tend to be rather small although there were some rigs in the 30' range in the campground when we were there. There are flush toilets but no showers. A dump station is available. The primo sites here are best suited to those using tents as they are set up in such a way that you park your vehicle and then walk 10' to 15' to your campsite along the shore of the lake. There are beautiful views from these sites and some work OK for smaller rigs. If you enjoy sitting around the campfire, hiking, fishing, canoeing, kayaking, bicycling or just being in the woods you'll enjoy this park. The not too difficult Thunder Knob trail leaves from the campground and takes you to gorgeous views of the Cascade Mountains and Ross Lake. The price I quote is for those with a Senior Access pass. Regular fee is $12 a night. We would definitely return!
09/2012
rating [ 6/10 ]
I was surprised to see that I was the last - and only one - to have reviewed this park. I've downgraded my rating a bit since the last time we were there though. The region suffered a huge windstorm awhile ago and many large trees that provided much needed shade were felled by the event. Now most of the sites are in direct sun which can make for a hot stay in this part of Washington state. I don't know if the layout of the park has changed from the last time we were there but this time I noticed that a lot of the sites are little more than a gravel pad with a picnic table and they are quite close to one another so that you have absolutely no privacy from your neighbor. These sites do have full or partial hook-ups however. In order to have some shade we stayed in the loop without any hook-ups and found it to be quiet, cool and peaceful. Each evening deer browsed on the grassy area in the center of the loop. The best sites are for those in tents and they are situated on grassy knolls with views of Curlew Lake. We would stay here again because the lake is pretty and there aren't a lot of other options in this area.
09/2012
rating [ 4/10 ]
I would have rated this park higher as it's physical layout is really quite nice and the location is great too but they have one of those "no RVs over 10 years old" rules that really turn us off. Our little trailer is a very well maintained 25 year old molded fiberglass rig. It's as cute as a button and we get compliments on it wherever we go. Just about the first thing the receptionist wanted to know as we went to check in was how old our trailer was. When I told her she frowned and told me their policy, but then she asked if we just wanted one night. When I said yes she replied that for just one night it would be OK. This is such a condescending attitude and if it hadn't been for the fact that we were tired and wanted to stop we would have looked for someplace else. An age limit on rigs is really the one thing that makes us NEVER want to return to a park. We didn't like this policy even when we had a rig that did fit the rule. When we pulled into our site we tested the electrical hookup and found the polarity was wrong so we asked if we could move to another site. That was not a problem and the next site was OK. The interior roads are narrow and I think really big rigs would have a hard time maneuvering into a site. I checked "no" on the family friendly box because there is no playground, pool or other amenity here for children. The park seems to be geared for older adults who want to stay long term. We would not stay here again - even if they let us.
09/2012
rating [ 6/10 ]
This park is older, but the management seems to be making improvements and keeping things up as best they can. In spite of the fact that there are some pretty run down rigs with permanent residents, everyone was friendly, and it was perfectly quiet at night, and we certainly felt safe here. Many of the residents are working in the nearby mines. They work long shifts and just want to come home and have dinner, watch some TV, and sack out. The restrooms are coded and were a little rundown but clean and servicable. There is a swimming pool that looked well maintained, but we didn't use it. The office includes a small store, and you can also buy propane here. Access from the freeway is very easy, and the Wi-Fi worked well. The price seemed a little high here for what you get, but I think it was the going rate for the area. We'd probably stay here again.
09/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a nice state park situated in a unique geological area. There are two areas to camp in. The older area has big trees for shade, but the sites are smaller. The new area has room for bigger rigs, but hasn't any shade. It's a short drive or a walk through the desert landscape to the dunes, which are pretty awesome and fun for kids to climb and slide down. Because the park is away form any big city lights the star gazing is fantastic! Bruneau Dunes is a peaceful, quiet and beautiful place to camp. We would definitely stay there again.
09/2012
rating [ 6/10 ]
We just needed an overnight stop and this was the first park we came to after getting off the interstate. Our first impression of the park was good. There was a comfy ambiance to it and the people in the office were friendly. Checking in was easy. The sites were narrow, but since we have a small travel trailer this wasn't a problem for us. The restrooms were somewhat old, but overall were in good condition and very clean. The park is in close proximity to a train track and about six or seven trains went by during our time there - they can be quite loud. The park has many permanent residents and quite a few of them are living in poorly kept up rigs with lots of stuff stored around their sites. A neighbor's yappy dog, kept tied up outside, kept us awake at night. The park Wi-Fi was not working well and we could only get an internet connection by taking our laptop down to the office. This was an OK park for one night but we would probably check out other places if we ever need to stay in Wells again.
09/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
Our second time to stay at this pleasant park. There seemed to be more permanent residents this time but everything is kept quite neat and tidy and it was very quiet and peaceful at night. Lots of people using the walking/jogging trail around the perimeter of the park - a nice amenity I think. The tepees would be fun for families but except for the fact that they're tepees they seemed quite basic. I couldn't figure out the restroom/shower set-up. There were facilities for the tepees but as far as I could figure out everyone else would have to use the toilets and showers at the pool. Not a problem for us really as we used the bathroom in our trailer, but it seemed a little odd. Be aware that the Yakama Nation forbids alcoholic beverages in the park. We would stay here again. Our price reflects a 15% Escapees discount.
09/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
We've stayed here several times on our way through this part of Oregon. This is a large park with several campground loops, each with its own character. We like to stay in the loop that is closest to the river because so many of its sites have great views across the river to the hills on the other side. It can be quite windy in this loop though because it is more open than the other loops. This is an historically interesting park because it is situated on the spot where the early pioneers on the Oregon Trail left the Snake River and thus it became known as Farewell Bend. We would stay here again for sure.
08/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
Johnny Creek is a beautiful National Forest Service campground located about 12 miles from the Bavarian themed town of Leavenworth. This campground is situated at the confluence of Johnny and Icicle Creeks and is split into two areas, Lower Johnny and Upper Johnny. Both areas are nice, but Lower Johnny is the best because many of the sites give you views and direct access to Icicle Creek. The sites are spacious, quite private, peaceful and beautiful. There are no fancy amenities here, just vault toilets, a picnic table, a fire ring and the great outdoors. This campground appeals mostly to tents and those with camper vans, truck campers, pop-up trailers, small travel trailers or small motorhomes, although motorhomes in the 30' range should have no problem fitting into some sites. Access roads and sites are paved. Drinking water is available but there are no hook-ups or dump station. Come prepared to be self contained and laid back! All of the NFS campgrounds along Icicle River Road are popular in the summer. Get there early to nab a spot on the weekends. Our rate reflects the fact that we have a Federal Senior Pass and get 50% off the regular rate. Fees for Lower Johnny are two dollars more than for Upper Johnny. We would definitely stay here again.
08/2012
rating [ 5/10 ]
First, the pros: The surrounding country in this part of the state is beautiful and historically interesting. If you like hiking, bicycling, exploring, hunting, fishing or ATV riding you'll find lots to do. This park is situated on a reservoir with some beautiful old willows that provide much appreciated shade during the hot summer months. The restrooms were clean and modern (showers for 50 cents for 3 minutes). The park is within walking distance of the small town of Conconully if you should need any supplies. Be aware that although there are sites available along the lake shore, they are quite primitive and suitable primarily for tenters. Now the cons: If you want a site with electrical and water hook-ups you will be out in the sun in a shadeless area. Better have a good air conditioner! If you can do without hook-ups there are sites on the grass under the big willows. These sites however are rather odd in that they are so ill defined that people just park in a willy-nilly manner and it's very difficult to tell where one site ends and another begins. Additionally, although the shade can be most welcome, branches falling out of the trees when the wind comes up are not! We ended up moving our trailer out from under the trees at 10:00 pm in the dark because branches as big as 1 and 1/2" to 2" in diameter were falling out of them and hitting our rig. None of the sites offer any privacy so be prepared to hear and see your neighbors. For some reason, although the town of Conconully is small and off the beaten track, everyone in town seems to spend all day going up and down the road that abuts the campground and most of them are driving a motorcycle, ATV or big pick-up truck. All this makes for a noisy experience, although things did quiet down after dark. Finally, we thought the price of $22 for an ill defined place to park on the grass with no hook-ups was a little steep. We would probably look for somewhere else to stay if we go back to this area, but good camping spots in this part of the state are few and far between.
08/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a National Forest Service campground situated near Early Winters Creek at an elevation of 3,000 ft. That extra elevation is certainly welcome during the summer when the Methow Valley can be an oven. This is a pretty but primitive campground with spacious sites amid some nice firs and Ponderosa pines. The creek is fast flowing and clear, but since the campground is situated up on a bluff above it, access is somewhat limited. There is a maintained trail to the creek however and you can hear the relaxing sounds of the rushing water from many of the sites. This is a great campground for just kicking back and relaxing. Don't expect anything fancy, just peace and quiet. We would definitely stay here again. The rate reflects the fact that we have a Federal Senior Pass giving us a 50% discount.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a beautiful campground set amid oaks, California buckeyes, manzanitas and other lovely trees and shrubs. Our site, #22, was a back-in site which was large, spacious, fairly level and nestled in its own little grove of oaks. There are flush toilets and running water in the campground, but no showers. The dump station is across the road where there is also a potable water source for filling your fresh water tanks. Use of the bear storage boxes is strictly enforced. This campground makes a great base for exploring Sequoia National Park. Our fee reflects the fact that we have a Golden Age Pass. The regular nightly fee is $18. I would not recommend this campground to anyone with a big rig due to the narrow winding roads both in the campground itself and into the park from Three Rivers, but for anyone in a smaller rig or tent camping, it's a gem!
09/2011
rating [ 4/10 ]
We stayed here about 5 years ago and it was kind of funky then and it's even more so now! The lady in the office claimed to be the assistant manager, but she didn't seem very well versed in the check in procedures at all. We asked for a spot with as much shade as possible and she put us in a spot with no shade. I walked back down to the office to see if we could move to another site which did have some shade and was also closer to the restrooms. There was one of those "back in a few minutes" notes taped to the door. Since there wasn't exactly a lack of spots for anyone else who might show up, we just went ahead and moved. When we tried to plug in our electric cord, using our little tester gadget we discovered there was something faulty with the outlet. No wonder, the post looked like it had been run over numerous times! So we just ran off our battery for the night. Supposedly there is Wi-Fi, but you can't get it at any of the sites, you have to bring your laptop down to the office. The park is situated on a hill overlooking Lake Isabella and the sites are terraced up the hill. They are quite short and narrow and all back-ins. This park will do as an overnight stop, but it's hardly what I would call a resort and the price is too high considering its age and level of maintenance.
09/2011
rating [ 6/10 ]
We stayed at this county campground while visiting Yosemite National Park. This campground, as well as several other county run campgrounds along Highway 120, makes a good alternative to the campgrounds within the park which are often full and/or booked up months in advance. The campground is situated along Lee Vining Creek and far enough off the highway to be peaceful and quiet. This is a primitive campground with no hook ups, no running water, no flush toilets, etc. Generators are allowed during limited hours. There is no dump station, but you can dump your tanks at the gas station in Lee Vining for $5 or for free with a fill-up. The pit toilet in the campground was as clean as a pit toilet can be and even came outfitted with a magazine rack! The additional portal potties were in terrible shape. Bear boxes are provided at each campsite and the use of them is enforced. Leave no food or other smelly items in your vehicle unless you want to risk a fine and/or a wrecked vehicle! Our fee of $7 a night reflects the fact that we have a Golden Age pass. The regular fee is $14 a night. We'd stay here again. The drive up Highway 120 (also known as Tioga Pass) is beautiful!
09/2011
rating [ 4/10 ]
We had mechanical problems with our tow vehicle and so spent two nights here while we had repairs done in Susanville. This is an older, rather dilapidated park. There appeared to be a small mobile home park behind the RV part of the establishment too. The young woman at the desk was very friendly, helpful and accommodating which went a long ways towards mitigating the physical decrepitude of the park. The restroom was as clean as one could expect it to be considering the fact that there was a lot of deferred maintenance issues with it. Our site was indeed on very sandy soil, but we did have a few trees to provide some welcome shade and we were right next to a little water feature where we enjoyed watching hummingbirds come to drink. The view out to Honey Lake is pretty, especially at sunrise and sunset. If you're looking for a spiffy modern resort, this is certainly not it, but if you just need a safe quiet place to sleep for the night, this will do.
09/2011
rating [ 5/10 ]
We used this park as a base for exploring Lassen Volcanic NP and the surrounding area. This park was adequate, but the owners and staff could give more attention to details and customer service. For example, when we pulled in and registered we were simply assigned a spot. The lady at the desk never asked if we'd like a spot along the "lake" even though some were available. I only discovered them after we were all set up and I went for a walk. Our site's fire pit was full of cigarette butts and trash and stayed that way for the entire three days of our stay and I noticed the same situation in other empty sites. The showers in the restroom were clean and spacious, but in the one I used the light was not working and the hook for hanging up your clothes was broken. These are simple things to fix and really add to a park's good impression in my opinion. As other reviewers have mentioned, the Wi-Fi arrangement is weird. We were given two coupons that got us a total of 4 hours connection for free, then we had to purchase more time for $2 a day, but like someone else said, you are limited to a certain amount of data transmission each 48 hours and I quickly neared my maximum, at which time my connection speed slowed to a crawl. You'd probably be OK if all you do is check e-mail, but if you want to upload photos to a photo sharing site for instance, you will quickly reach your maximum allotted data amount. I've never encountered this sort of Wi-Fi arrangement before in all our travels. All in all, this was an OK spot to stay for a few days, but we will probably check out the other park in the area if we pass this way again.
09/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground is located in the Lava Beds National Monument. The campground is old and small, but located in a beautiful and unique area that features fascinating geological formations and interesting human history. The sites are quite small and it's difficult to tell where one begins and another ends, but everyone seemed pretty casual about just fitting their rig in however they could without blocking the access roads. The campground is situated in a hilly location and many of the sites would present leveling difficulties for an RV, but would not be a problem for tents. We were able to get a pull through site that was fairly level. Since the sites are small and the roads twisty and narrow I wouldn't recommend this campground to anyone with a big rig. There are no hook-ups, but there is water available and flush toilets. If you enjoy "roughing it" in beautiful natural surroundings, you'll like this campground. A feature of the park that many come for is the abundance of lava tubes and caves open for exploring. We would like to return to this campground and see more of the monument some day. The rate we paid was half-off the normal rate of $10 a night because we have a Golden Age pass.
09/2011
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a pleasant Oregon State Park set amid an open pine forest. We only spent the night as we were just passing through, but this made a good quiet layover. My husband enjoyed the logging museum. We would stay here again. You really can't go wrong with any Oregon State Park.
09/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
We've stayed at this park several times when traveling up or down the I-5 corridor and it's always a pleasant experience. This time we camped in the A loop where we had water and electricity, but no sewer connection. Like others have commented, the A loop can be a little more noisy, but the sites have more privacy. On this occasion, the campground was perfectly quiet and peaceful. The showers are clean and free with plenty of hot water - a real treat for those of us who travel in small trailers. An added bonus for us was picking up fresh organic produce at a farm stand just across the road from the park. We would definitely stay here again.
03/2010
rating [ 5/10 ]
I'd like to emphasize that I'm rating just the campground here, NOT the ghost town part of this complex. I feel the campground itself deserves just an average rating. It's not terrible, but it's not particularly great either. We opted for a site with just an electrical hook up. It was quite small and very uneven and rocky as are a lot of the sites. There is no privacy at all between the sites. I thinks this campground could be really dusty in windy weather too. The "ghost town" itself is quite interesting though and well worth a look. There is a small museum, lots of western themed shops, a couple of eateries and a little train ride. You can also take a self-guided tour of a real silver mine for just $1, a terrific bargain. Kids will love this place. Given that your camp fee includes entrance into the ghost town, we'd definitely stay here again.
03/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Our second time to use this park as an overnight stop. It's an attractive park with friendly management. Access on and off the highway is easy. There is some noise from the nearby truck stop. Lots of truckers spend the night there and the noise of their idling engines can be annoying. Both times we've stayed here we've had sites with some considerable slope that took a bit of fussing to get the rig level. These are small issues though and we would definitely stay here again. Excellent Wi-Fi!
03/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
Very clean and quiet park. There are not a lot of amenities, but the park makes an excellent base for seeing Sedona, Prescott and the old mining town of Jerome. Also, don't miss the ancient Puebloan ruins at Montezuma's Castle. The owners were very nice. We'd stay here again.
02/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a difficult park to rate. Is it fun? Definitely! Is it funky? That too! If you're looking for the kind of place that's filled up with gold plated motorhomes all lined up in a row, this isn't the place for you. If you're looking for a park with nice scenery, lots of activities that you can partake in or not, access to miles of trails through the desert, great management and friendly fellow RVers, then this is the park for you. The sites at this park vary from large spacious spots big enough for a big rig to tiny shoehorn spots just right for a camper van. Everyone is welcome! We had to spend a few nights in the overflow dry camping area ($12 a night) which is quite close to a rather busy road, but then we were able to move to a full hook up spot for the rest of our stay. This park is showing its age and is a little rough around the edges, but we'd definitely stay here again. One of the most pleasant parks we've ever stayed at and one of the most unique!
02/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
I can't really add much to what others have already said. This is a great park close to all the urban attractions of Tucson, but isolated enough to feel like you're out in the wilderness. Plenty of trails to hike and bike or ride a horse. Beautiful scenery. The park advises that the entry road can become impassable due to flash flooding during heavy rainstorms. This time it rained heavily all during one night and the next day a raging muddy stream was pouring over the road making entry into or exit out of the park impossible. If heavy rains are predicted, you might want to consider leaving early or be able to be flexible! We weren't able to do some of the things we wanted to do in town for a day while crews cleared the road. The fee I give here is for a dry camp site. We'd definitely stay here again.
02/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park makes a good place to spend a night or two. We slayed over here for one night on our way to Tucson. The park was a little confusing to find but once there we liked it quite a bit. The office staff was friendly and the sites are level and spacious. There is nice desert landscaping which is still quite young, but will get better as time goes by. As someone else mentioned, the clubhouse looks very utilitarian from the outside but is fixed up very nice inside. Some faint highway noise, but nothing to complain about. We'd stay here again.
02/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
This was our second time to use this park. Many snowbirds stay here for months at a time. In the area with the water and electric hookups the sites are extremely close together, arranged rather haphazardly and have no privacy, but folks seem to enjoy all the socializing with their neighbors. If you like a real neat and tidy campground, this isn't it. People have stuff all over the place, but everyone seems quite good natured about it all. For just a short stay we like the dry sites even though they can be a little tricky to maneuver into. This time we got a site with a view of the river and some nice big old shade trees. As with the last time we stayed here, the campground host allowed us to hook up to the water faucet near our site. People have commented on the water. In general, when traveling in the Southwest we use tap water only for showering, doing the dishes, etc. We stick to bottled water for drinking. We like this campground as a base for seeing Quartzsite. It's a lot prettier than anything you'll find in Quartzsite and a lot more quiet too. We'd stay here again.
02/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
One of the best State Parks we've ever stayed at. This was our third visit. The scenery is mind blowing and the campsites are laid out thoughtfully to take in the views or nestle in among the big red rock formations. There are great hikes and scenic drives. Everything is well kept up and there is a small but excellent Visitors Center. This rate is for a site with electricity and water. Dry camping is $14 per night. Your $6 entry fee can be deducted from the cost of your first night's fee. I highly recommend this park!
02/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
Our fourth trip to Death Valley and we enjoyed it just as much this time as in our previous visits. Death Valley is one of our favorite National Parks and Furnace Creek Campground makes a great central location for exploring it. Don't expect luxury, this is basic camping. There are no hook-ups, but a dump station with potable water is available. There are flush toilets, but no showers. Some of the sites have great views of the Panamint and Funeral Mountains. Limited generator hours, no cell phone reception and no Wi-Fi. Come with everything you need. Gas, propane, groceries, etc., are all very expensive within the park and it's a long way to town! The rate quoted is with our Senior Pass. The regular fee is $18. We'd definitely stay here again.
02/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
A basic, clean, friendly Escapees park on the outskirts of Pahrump. We use this park as a base to get groceries, do laundry, etc., before heading off to Death Valley. You must be an Escapees member to stay at this park. This rate is for full hook-ups. We'd use this park again.
02/2010
rating [ 6/10 ]
There are no hook ups at this Lake Mead National Recreation Area campground, but there is a dump station and water is available also. This is a basic but pleasant pleasant park and a good alternative to Lake Mead RV Village (which is right next door) if you don't need hook ups. We paid half the normal rate because we have a Federal Parks Senior Pass. We'd stay here again.
02/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
We've used this park before and have always had a pleasant experience here. This stay was no exception. We were able to get a large pull through site on the end of a row. In my opinion the waterfront sites are not worth the additional cost. Sites are gravel with concrete patios and picnic tables. There is no Wi-Fi but you can use a courtesy computer in the store to check e-mail, etc. As someone else mentioned: this campground is run by a concessionaire and lies within the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. You must pay a fee to enter the area which has many recreational opportunities for the whole family. If you stay here, don't miss a side trip to Hoover Dam. The nearby town of Boulder City is one of the nicest small cities in Nevada. Boulder City is the only town in Nevada that doesn't allow gambling: a refreshing change! We would definitely stay here again.
01/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
We used this park for a 2 night layover. The friendly campground hosts met us and helped us into our spot which was large and pleasant with nice shrubs separating us from our neighbors to provide a sense of privacy. Everything was very clean and well kept. The park is located far enough off the highway to be nice and quiet. It appeared that most of the sites were occupied by snowbirds who return year after year with just a few sites reserved for overnighters, but everyone was very welcoming. Wi-Fi worked fine. Our stay here was very pleasant and we would definitely stay here again. As someone else mentioned: this park takes only cash or checks.
01/2010
rating [ 6/10 ]
We have visited Joshua Tree National Park several times but had never stayed in this campground before. We have a 32' motorhome and tow a Subaru Forester. I would not recommend this campground to anyone driving this sort of set-up. The roads inside the campground were extremely rough and had been made even worse by heavy rains that had fallen just prior to our visit. We found only two or three sites that we felt were suitable for a rig of our size. The area is nice enough, but not as pretty as Jumbo Rocks in my opinion and Jumbo Rocks has more spaces that work for larger rigs and is more convenient to the rest of the park. Be aware that there are no hook-ups of any kind nor any water or dump station at Indian Cove. There are pit toilets, but no showers. This is a dry camping experience, so come prepared. As others have said, generator hours are very limited. I would recommend this campground to anyone tent camping or using a small trailer or truck camper, but not to anyone with a large rig. We would not stay here again. We paid $7.50 with our Golden Age pass, for others the fee is $15 a night.
01/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
We have used this park several times and never been disappointed. The park is set in among an orange grove and if you're there at the right time you can pick delicious oranges right off the trees for your personal use. The office staff are pleasant and helpful. Free coffee and donuts are available in the office every morning. There are two computers in the office that guests can use which came in handy for us as we had a sick laptop. The Wi-Fi reception can be spotty so if that's important to you make sure to request a site with good reception. The laundry room has got to be the cleanest and best one in an RV park that I have ever used. High efficiency front loading machines make doing a load of laundry a pleasure! The park also has an area for washing cars and RVs that we appreciate very much. The train noise seemed a little louder this time to me for some reason, but that's the only negative thing I can think of. We would definitely use this park again.
01/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
The park itself is pleasant enough and has easy access from the freeway. Traffic can be a bit noisy. The office area could stand some upkeep and a better presentation - lots of clutter both inside and out. The sites along the row we were in are very wide, but not deep enough to keep your toad attached unless you pull in at an angle across the site, which the lady in the office said we were free to do. I would not consider this a destination park, but it made an acceptable place to overnight. We would stay here again.
01/2010
rating [ 3/10 ]
Our experience was a lot different than the other reviewer's. This is primarily an old mobile home park with only a few small sites for overnighters. A lot of the permanent units are not well kept up. Our site was very narrow and we didn't even try to put our slide out. When we pulled in, a sign on the "office" (the kitchen of a disheveled mobile home) said to come in and just shout for someone, but no one was there. So we took an empty spot and called the number listed for the park. A man answered and said the management was "in transition", but he came and collected our money. The park did not appear to be well maintained at all - a garbage can right next to our rig was overflowing with trash. It may also be coincidental, but we picked up a computer virus while using the Wi-Fi at this park. We would probably not stay here again.
01/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a convenient, well-kept park with spacious sites. The lady in the office was very helpful with information on what to see and do while in the area. Don't miss the giant redwoods in Humboldt Redwoods State Park or the drive along the Lost Coast. A visit to the Victorian town of Ferndale is also well worth your time. We would stay here again.
01/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
I rarely give a park a rating of 10, but Harris Beach deserves one. Just about every Oregon State Park we have ever stayed at has been nice, but Harris Beach has got to be our favorite. The park is located high on a bluff in a spectacular setting. Sites in the C-loop have ocean views. We chose a site a little farther back and as close to the park office as we could get because the park ranger advised us that only a few sites get a good Wi-Fi signal and those are the ones closest to the office. The sites are pretty, spacious and private. Our site had electric, water and cable but no sewer. I paid $7.99 for a week of Wi-Fi and our connection was great. During our stay we had very stormy weather and enjoyed some great wave watching. We would definitely stay here again and I highly recommend this park.
01/2010
rating [ 3/10 ]
This park is very run down and needs some major maintenance. There are many permanent residents in very run down, ill-maintained rigs. A lot of the sites had trash and junk stored all around them. Our electrical and water hook-ups were old and questionable. On the plus side it was quiet, the lady in the office was nice and we had a Wi-Fi signal (although it was a very slow connection). We would probably not stay here again unless the management made significant improvements.
01/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
A great State Park to use as a base for exploring this part of the beautiful Oregon coast. Many different types of sites are available from tent sites to yurts and everything in between. Sites in the A loop, closest to the beach, also have cable TV. We chose a full hook-up site farther back in the woods to stay out of the high winds. Be advised that if you come in the winter the weather can be stormy, but this can also make for some of the most dramatic wave watching. You'd be wise to make reservations in the summer. You pretty much can't go wrong with any of the Oregon State Parks as far as I'm concerned. We've camped here before and would certainly stay here again.
01/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
After reading a lot of reviews about campgrounds available in the Vancouver, WA / Portland, OR area, we decided to give this park a try while visiting a friend in Portland. This is an older, no frills park. There were a lot of permanent residents, but the large majority of the units were well kept. This park is easy to get to from I-5 and is surprisingly quiet for being so near major highways. There is a Safeway within walking distance and many other shopping centers within a short drive. It's about a 20 minute drive into downtown Portland. The lady in the office was very nice. Our site was large and easy to get in and out of. Wi-Fi is complimentary and worked well. If you want lots of bells and whistles and everything brand new this park will probably not appeal to you, but if you want a safe, clean, quiet spot to park then I would highly recommend this park. The rate I quote is with our Escapees membership discount. It's $21 with a Good Sam membership. We would definitely stay here again.
01/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
We have used this park several times before as it makes a good layover spot on our way going north or south on I-5. The sites are easy to pull through and you won't need to unhook your toad if you have one. Although a large portion of this park is reserved for permanent residents, everything is always kept very clean and tidy. The office staff is cheerful and friendly. Don't let the location in a rather industrial part of town put you off: it's very quiet at night. Wi-fi is free and the signal was good. There is a restaurant on the premises, but we have never tried it. We would definitely use this park again.
09/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
We stayed 3 nights while waiting to get our rig into the shop for some repairs. The first night we couldn't get a regular spot, but the park has an overflow area where we could still have electricity and water. We moved to a full hook-up site for the next two nights. The sites are very large and level with plenty of room to park a vehicle next to your rig. Everything is very well maintained and the lady in the office was nice. We didn't experience any noise problems from the nearby business parks. Our only complaint was that on our last night a very foul odor drifted over the park from a sewage treatment plant that is not too far away, but that's not exactly anything that the park has any control over! There is a lot to see and do in the area and the city of Grand Junction has a nice old downtown district worth a visit. Fall color in the Grand Mesa National Forest was fantastic!
09/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This state park is near the town of Fruita and adjacent to the Colorado River. There is a small boating and fishing lake. The sites are large and level with picnic tables and shade structures. The fee structure is a little odd. We paid $18 for a site with water and electricity. If we had unhooked our toad it would have been an additional $8. Since we were just staying the night we left the toad hooked up. If you were towing a car and couldn't get a pull-through site and had to unhook to get into a back-in site, would you still have to pay the additional fee? I guess so - the park staff didn't seem very flexible on this issue. There is some traffic and other "city" noise here as the campground is not too far off the freeway and near an interchange with convenience stores, fast food places and such. It's a pretty nice campground and would make a good base for seeing Colorado National Monument and the Grand Mesa National Forest. It is certainly a less expensive alternative to the commercial RV parks in the area and prettier too.
09/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is the only campground available inside the Colorado National Monument. It is situated on top of a plateau at approximately 5,700'. Short strolls from here will take you to stunning views of the city of Grand Junction and the Colorado River far below. The easiest access to the park is from the West (Fruita) entrance. From there it is about 4 miles to the campground. From the East (Grand Junction) entrance it is about a 19 mile drive to the campground. Both routes involve going through narrow tunnels with a minimum height of 11'5" at the edges and a maximum height of 16'1" near the center. The road in from the East entrance, which we used, is particularly narrow and winding with very few places to pull over and steep drop-offs. Be warned: if you do not like heights you will not like this road! The campground itself can accommodate RVs up to 32'. There are no hook-ups and I don't think there is a dump station, but water and flush toilets are available. Generator hours are 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM. The scenery is great! We probably won't bring our motorhome here again, but would definitely tent camp or come in a smaller rig. The monument has beautiful scenery and lots of hiking trails.
10/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This State Park is typical of the state parks in eastern Washington, which usually have large expanses of manicured grass like you would find in a city park. We have stayed at this park several times when travelling in this area and would use it again. On the plus side it has large level sites, easy access to hiking and biking trails and is close to other area attractions, including the towns of Wenatchee, Cashmere and Leavenworth. On the negative side, every time we have stayed here the park staff and camp hosts are nowhere to be seen. If you have any questions you will just have to figure things out for yourself. If you want to use the showers you have to buy tokens at a box by the main entry station which can be a bit of a walk from your site so if you think you might want to use the showers, get your tokens when you come into the park. Each site has a nice tent pad in addition to the RV parking space, but the one time we tent camped here with friends we all found it to be very noisy as the park is adjacent to an industrial area and the warehouses operated all night (we haven't noticed the noise when we have been in an RV). Don't leave anything out on the grass as it will get wet when the automatic sprinklers come on!
10/2008
rating [ 5/10 ]
Other reviewers have given this park worse ratings, which I feel are not deserved. While it is true that this park caters mostly to permanent residents it is nowhere near as bad as some of the comments would lead you to believe. Yes, it is true that there are a lot of old, run-down trailers in the park, but my feeling is that most of the folks living here are just trying to get by as best they can on extremely limited resources. If you can get past the fact that you might have to share space with some rigs that are not as new or fancy as your own, you might also see that the park has beautiful shade trees, well-tended lawns, a nice swimming pool and convenient location. Our space was a large back-in spot and close to the office so that our WiFi connection was great. While not a destination, we would use this park again if we were in the area.
10/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a very nice park located just a mile off I-90 making it easy to get to but quiet. It is very well maintained, with grassy strips between each site, flower beds near the office and plenty of mature shade trees. The sites are gravel, but nice and level. In season there is a swimming pool, but it was closed at this time of the year. This park used to be a KOA, but is now under independent ownership. Wi-Fi is available, but I had to take the lap top to the office to get it to work, which was a minor inconvenience. We would definitely stay here again.
10/2008
rating [ 4/10 ]
This park has a stunning location near the border of Grand Teton National Park. It's too bad the "resort" itself does not live up to its location. It is overpriced for the quality of the facilities. The sites are small and the access roads are narrow. The fire pit at our site was choked with cigarette butts (as were many of the others I observed). Our water hookup was wobbly and leaking. Maintenance did not seem to be a high priority for the management of this park as everything was rundown. The only reason they can charge the fees they do is that there are not a lot of other options. We would not stay here again.
09/2008
rating [ 4/10 ]
This campground is located near the shores of Devil Creek Reservoir. There are a variety of campsite types as well as dispersed dry camping, which is what we did. The reservoir will appeal to those who like to fish. While rather rough around the edges, this campground is easy to access off of I-15 yet far enough off the highway to be quiet and peaceful. I'm not sure just how many actual sites there are, but with the dispersed camping quite a number of rigs could be accommodated. This campground is definitely not fancy, but is good for a one night layover.
09/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
This is a hard park to rate. There is not a lot of competition in the area so your options are limited. The park is located in an industrial area on the truck route so we found it a little noisy. It is an old park, but clean and tidy. The sites are paved with gravel in between. There are a few trees, but the sites are not shady so it can be hot. Wi-Fi was only adequate; my signal strength was never better than "low". There is no laundry on site so if you want to do some wash you have to walk to a nearby laundromat. "Pop" is a model train enthusiast and his model railway layout is pretty neat, but it appeared the trains hadn't run in quite a while. Office hours are hit or miss, but if Pop is in the office he is a fount of information. If you pay for three nights (cash or check only) you get a fourth night free. Basically this was an adequate place to stay while doing day trips to Chaco Culture National Historic Park, Aztec National Monument and Durango. Don't expect anything fancy though.
09/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
Gallo Campground is the only place to stay inside Chaco Culture National Historic Park. Since Chaco is a long drive from any town, we chose to leave our motorhome in Farmington and take the toad to Chaco and car camp. Staying in the park will greatly enhance your visit. After turning off Hwy 550 it is a 21 mile drive on rough county roads to get to the park entrance. Only the first 5 miles or so are paved and then it is dirt and gravel which can be very wash board or even impassable in bad weather. We had no trouble with our Subaru Forester and even a passenger car could have made the trip with no problems at the time we were there. The campground is in a beautiful setting with a backdrop of lovely cliffs, but there is no shade so it can be very hot. This is a primitive campground with no potable water and no hook-ups. There are clean restrooms with running water and flush toilets, but no showers. Drinking water is only available at the Visitor Center. I believe there is a dump station. Some people do take large motorhomes to Chaco (the park brochure says "trailers over 30 feet long cannot be accommodated") but we saw only tents, truck campers, small Class-C's, pop-up trailers, short trailers and fifth wheels, camper vans and the like. The ruins of Chaco are spectacular (better than Mesa Verde in my opinion) and the neat thing is you don't need to take a ranger led tour to see them (although you can if you like).
09/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
We have stayed at prettier National Park campgrounds, but this is still a nice place. We made reservations in advance to get a full hook-up site, but if we go again we may just take our chances and settle for a dry site as there is not a huge difference in price. In September the campground was nowhere near full. Our site offered little privacy and no shade, but some of the dry sites do. It was very quiet at night and there were lots of stars to see. The park is very stringent about enforcing the bear-proofing rules. Basically don't leave anything out that might remotely smell of food or something a bear might think of as food (like sun-screen). Yes, this does include empty ice chests. We would stay here again as we always prefer to stay inside a park rather than at some place in a tourist town.
09/2008
rating [ 5/10 ]
We stayed two nights here while visiting Arches National Park and other sites in the area. We had hoped to stay at Deadhorse Point State Park, but it was full. This park is clean and neat, but really nothing special. As some others have said there is road noise, but it is not too bad and tapers off significantly at night. It appeared the owners were doing major improvements to the restrooms, but since I did not use them I can't comment on what was going on. The two things we didn't like about this park were: 1. although the owners brag that there is a tree at every site, most of the trees are quite small and don't really provide any shade to speak of, which would be very welcome in this hot environment and 2. as others have mentioned, the pull through sites are quite short. Our rig is not particularly long (32')and our toad is a compact car and we still had to park it crosswise behind our rig. The short sites would not prevent us from staying here again, but I think next time we will look for a park with more shade. Also, if we go at a cooler time of year, we will stay at one of the very scenic BLM campgrounds along the Colorado River. (800) 787-2751
09/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a lovely older park on the outskirts of Provo. The interior roads are a little narrow but we didn't have any trouble manuevering our 32' motorhome with a toad into our spot. Most of the sites have a lot of shade which we like. The office also features an old fashioned store and the staff is friendly. There are a lot of long term residents but everything is neat and tidy. Wi-Fi is excellent. The park is located about 2 miles west of I-15 in a quiet setting which is very nice. We would definitely stay here again.
09/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
This is a convenient layover spot on I-84, but I would not consider it a destination. The park itself is fairly well maintained and the big mature shade trees are very welcome. Access is easy and the sites are level. The convenience store is a little down at the heels - not a place I wanted to linger. I would give this park a higher rating where it not for its proximity to the freeway and the resulting noise which made sleeping difficult. The rate quoted reflects the fact that we elected to dry camp.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
We have used this park several times when in Yakima to visit relatives. Quite frankly, there really aren't any other options in Yakima as far as we are concerned and this is just a 5 minute drive to our relatives. The park is spacious, clean and quiet with large, level, paved pull through sites. As others have stated, most of the rigs here belong to long term residents, but we have never encountered any rude people and Bill, the owner, is always friendly and accommodating. We like the large dog area even if it is unfenced. The park is nicely, if somewhat minimally, landscaped. There are quite a few trees in the park, but they are all young and really not mature enough in my opinion to be called shade trees yet so don't count on them offering much shade if you go to Yakima in the summer! If this park would start offering Wi-Fi I would up my rating to an 8.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
As with other parks along the Columbia Gorge, I would give this park a higher rating if it weren't for the trains. However, Ainsworth is probably the least noisy compared to either Viento (awful!) or Memaloose. The setting is certainly beautiful and the amenities are good. We stayed 3 nights and had a great time exploring the old Historic Columbia River Highway, much of which can be driven in a car (but NOT a large RV), and some of which can be hiked or bicycled. Be sure to see Multnomah Falls and Vista House at Crown Point. One note of caution: sites A1 through A13, being on a hill, all slope to a greater or lesser degree. We had a devil of a time getting level and finally moved to a site lower down the hill that was closer to the train tracks, but more level.
03/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
As others have mentioned, you can't get away from the train noise. This is just a fact of life along the Columbia Gorge. We didn't find the trains too horrible at this park, especially when compared to their noise level at Viento State Park which is further west along the river (Viento is by far the noisiest park we have ever camped at when it comes to trains!). In spite of train noise, we would camp here again. The park is quite lovely from a scenic standpoint. We enjoyed the Discovery Season rate of $16 for our full hook-up site.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
A nice State Park along the Deschutes River that makes a good base while visiting the surrounding area. The High Desert Museum and Newberry National Monument are well worth seeing. The campground is open year round and there are yurts to rent in addition to camping spaces. Sites numbered 82, 85, 87, 89 and 92 are right along the river and, in my opinion, the most scenic. However, they are small and have no hook-ups so are only suitable for tenter's or those with small rigs. Oregon State Parks offers good deals during the "Discovery Season" from October 1 - April 30. The rate I quote was for a full hook-up site. Note there is no dump station at Tumalo and the park brochure warns not to dump a full holding tank at your campsite connection as it may overflow.
03/2008
rating [ 5/10 ]
We basically just needed a place to stop for the night. This is an older RV and mobile home park located on the south end of town in a quiet neighborhood next to a city park. While not fancy by any means, it was adequate for a short stay.
03/2008
rating [ 4/10 ]
Our over all impression of this park was that it was old, run down and being managed in a very lack luster manner. We expect much better in a Good Sam park. There were a lot of permanent residents in older, ill-cared for rigs. When we checked in the man in the office was indifferent and when I inquired about internet access (the ad in our Trailer Life Directory claimed "internet access available"), his only response was that the "system is down" for which he offered no explanation or apology. The site he put us in was extremely narrow and barely long enough for our 32' motor home and toad. Other rigs came in to the sites on either side of us and also had trouble getting into their spaces. We would not stay here again.
03/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
This is the best campground to stay at in Death Valley National Park if you want to explore the North end of the Park, including Ubehebe Crater, Eureka Dunes and the Racetrack. Scotty's Castle is just a few miles away. This campground does not take reservations, but rarely fills up. It has restrooms with flush toilets. There are no hookups, but there is a dump station. Generator hours are from 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM. Most of the sites will accommodate RVs, but they are almost all quite rocky and uneven. Many will require you to do some creative leveling. That said, this is still a nice campground if you want to experience the grandeur of Death Valley. Keep your dogs under control and don't let them out at night - coyotes serenaded us in the campground each night of our stay.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This park is located in a quiet area on the outskirts of Pahrump and has nice mountain views. As we have come to expect from an Escapees park, everyone was very friendly. Since we were only staying for one night we opted to park in the dry camp area where you can stay for one night for free (after that boon docking is $5 a day with a 7 day limit). You must be an Escapees member to stay here.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
We were just passing through and this was a layover night for us. The park is some distance outside of Kingman and situated in a fairly scenic location, although it is fairly close to the freeway and a truck stop. The park has nice desert landscaping and was very clean. This would be a good place to stay if you are into horses as they are also a "horse motel". I thought the fully fenced off-leash area for dogs was a thoughtful amenity. My only complaint is that the site we were in sloped from front to back and we had some difficulty getting level. We would stay here again.
02/2008
rating [ 10/10 ]
Well, I almost didn't write a review of this park because I didn't want anyone else to know about this place. I wanted to keep it a secret for fear that it will get too popular and then we won't be able to get in next time we want to stay here, but fair is fair and if I'm going to write about a bad experience I guess I should write about a good experience when I have one. This is by far the nicest and most well-run RV park we have ever stayed at. The office staff is highly competent, knowledgeable about the area, accommodating to guests' needs, gracious and cheerful. The park itself is nicely situated on a gently sloping hill a few miles outside of Benson with peace and quiet and great desert views. The spacious community clubhouse features a large kitchen, laundry room, library, TV watching area, exercise room and areas for card playing, etc. There are tons of activities from line dancing to hiking to ATV riding to quilting to aerobics to whatever else might interest you. The residents are diverse in their interests and unfailingly friendly. They take great pride in their park and it shows. We spent a week in a full hook-up site (base rate is $15/day and electricity is extra) and 3 days in the dry camp area for $5/night. My only negative comment is that none of the Escapees parks takes reservations so it is always a bit of a gamble when you pull in as to whether there will be a spot available or not, but it has usually worked out well for us. You must be an Escapees member to use this park and you can dry camp for only 3 days unless you get on a waiting list for a full hook-up site. We will definitely be back.
02/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
I would have given this park a 5 (which is average, not bad) except fot the wonderful lady in the office who is a one-woman Willcox and Cochise County booster. She was an absolute wealth of information on the area's history and what to see and do. This park is a small, older park with about a dozen mobile homes in the center and RV spaces ranged around the edges. Although there were a few rather shabby permanently parked rigs, over all the park was well-kept. Be advised that the swimming pool is just one of those small round above-ground jobs, but kids would find it OK I'm sure. There is a nice recreation room with free coffee and you can check out videos for free and there is also a good selection of paperback books for lending or swapping. Train noise is not too noticable and not loud enough to keep you from a good night's sleep unless you are a very light sleeper. No freeway noise. WiFi worked fine. This park made a perfectly adequate base for exploring Chiricahua National Monument, Fort Bowie National Historic Site and Cochise Stronghold. Additionally, thousands of Sandhill cranes make their winter home on the Willcox Playa and they are a wonderful site to see too.
03/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
Not a particularly fancy park, but clean and quiet. Our pull-through site was large and level, but had no privacy from our neighbors. The sites along the south side of the park are back ins and shaded by small pine trees, but these were all occupied. The lady in the office was very personable and friendly. It appeared that many rigs in the park were camped there for the winter and they only have a few sites for those just passing through. On the morning we pulled out there was a well attended pot-luck breakfast going on in the rec room adjacent to the office. About the only thing we didn't like was that you have to pay for WiFi if you want it and the daily rate was $7, much too high in my opinion so we did without. We would definitely use this park again for an overnight or few days stay when passing through this area.
03/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
Our third stay at this park and I like it better each time! This time we camped in a non-hookup site which I actually preferred. It was a pull through, easy to get in to, spacious with some privacy from neighbors and had a great view of the Catalina Mountains. The park is convenient to most Tucson attractions and has lots of trails of its own to explore. Would have stayed longer if time had allowed.
03/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
We had hoped to stay at the Escapees park just down the road, but all the spaces (even in the dry camp area) were taken. As it was late in the day and we didn't want to spend a lot of time running all over town looking for another place, we called this park to see if they had space and they did so we decided to come here. This is an upscale RV "resort" and so the amenities are quite nice if you want that sort of thing. Two things make this park unappealing to us. First, it is right on a busy road and so is quite noisy and secondly, there is very little to no privacy between sites which, although they are large, have no landscaping separating one from another. the price I quote is for one night with a Good Sam discount plus tax. Wi-Fi was good. I would give this park a higher rating if it weren't so noisy.
01/2008
rating [ 5/10 ]
This is an adequate place to stay while in the Rio Grande Valley. It is a smaller, older RV and Mobile Home park that is cheaper than a lot of the parks in this area. The rate I quote is for a week. It is a few miles north of Interstate 83 and so is more quiet than other parks nearer the highway. The park is occupied primarily by "winter Texans" who come here for the whole winter season. There are many park models and older trailers permanently parked, most fairly well maintained. The lots are quite small and close to one another, but separated from each other by citrus trees. Our site had a small concrete patio and no landscaping other than sparse grass. You are likely to have little privacy from your neighbor. This is a senior citizen park with activities geared accordingly, and children are only allowed to visit, not stay permanently. Although we didn't share too many interests with our fellow campers, everyone was welcoming and friendly. There is a 30lb. limit on pet size. The park has Wi-Fi (mostly a low, but adequate signal), but there is an extra charge for it. Although this is not the greatest park we have ever stayed at, it was perfectly fine and the $125 a week rate was to our liking. It made a good base for exploring the Rio Grande Valley. We would stay here again.
01/2008
rating [ 6/10 ]
We found this park to be an adequate one night layover spot. When we pulled into the park there was a "campground full" sign out at the entrance station, but I went inside to make sure. It was a good thing I did since the ranger told me that they were just making sure that people who were supposed to be checked out really were (the check-out time was 2:00 pm and it was just a bit past that when we arrived). He told me that even if the campground was full they would find room for us in an overflow area used for dry camping. So that was nice of him. It turned out that there were several spaces available so we were able to get in with no problem. This is a very large park and the main attraction is bass fishing on Lake Casa Blanca. Since we aren't into sports fishing, we didn't care a lot about that. The park is open to day use up until 10:00 pm and then they close the gate, but give you a code in case you want to go in and out after that. We took a spot away from the lake as we like quiet and the ranger advised that spots by the lake can sometimes be a little noisy with all the activity there. The park is in a fairly urban setting just on the outskirts of Laredo near the airport, but we felt secure and there was little air traffic noise. Judging by all the stuff accumulated around some of the rigs, it appeared that some people had been camped here for quite a long time. Either the park has lenient camping policies or they are ignoring the limits campers can stay. We would stay here again, but only as a layover, not as a destination. The price quoted is for holders of an annual Texas State Parks pass, otherwise it would be $18.
01/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a nice State Park to stop at if you are traveling I-90. It is just a few miles west of the small town of Comstock. The campground itself is very open, with no shade, which would make it very hot in warmer weather, but was nice in January. The sites are spacious, but because there is very sparse vegetation you have no visual privacy from your neighbor. The main draw here is the tours of the ancient rock art in Seminole Canyon which are led by knowledgable volunteers from the non-profit Rock Art Foundation. There is also a nice Visitor's Center with interpretive displays. There are hiking trails in the area. The price reflects the fact that we purchase a Texas State Park annual pass for $60, since we knew we would be staying at other Texas State Parks. Without the pass, the fee for a water/electric site would be $20. Texas parks charge a fee per person per day in addition to the camping fee.
01/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This was the first time that we took advantage of our Escapees membership to stay at one of the co-op parks. The $5 fee was for dry camping. Our stay at this park was mostly positive. The park residents were very friendly, helpful and welcoming but the park manager was rather brusque and indifferent. We considered taking a site with hook-ups for a higher fee but the manager seemed unable or unwilling to give me an idea of what the charge for electricity might run. Surely she must have some idea of what the average charge runs at this time of year. All I wanted was a ball-park figure. Other than that our experience was positive. As Escapee members we had access to all the park facilities - pool, hot-tub, laundry room, recreation hall and library (very tidy and well organized). Wi-Fi was available in the recreation hall. We liked that the park was out of town, as we don't enjoy camping along busy streets or freeways. We would use this park again on our way through the area - can't beat the dry camping price. You do have to be an Escapees member to use this park, and no reservations are available, but if you call the park they can give you a good idea whether they will have room for you or not.
12/2007
rating [ 9/10 ]
Well, the only thing that has changed since my last review of this campground is the fee which has gone from $5 to $10. The rocks are still stunning, the sunsets spectacular and the night sky studded with stars. Get out of the private RV parks for a change and sample the splendors of our National Parks. Keep in mind that this campground has no hook-ups and no water. There are only pit toilets and no showers. Big rigs in the 40' range will find the sites pretty cramped and the park roads narrow but we did fine with our 32' Class A and toad.
12/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
The past reviews for this park seem to be all over the map. This was the second time that we have stayed at this park, and we really like it. It is a convenient place to layover for a few days when travelling through California on the way to the Southwest. The park is clean, and the sites are large, if somewhat close together. Coming from the rainy Northwest, we get a big kick out of camping among the orange trees and picking oranges. Contrary to one poster's comments, we have found these to be the juiciest, tastiest oranges we've ever had. Free Wi-fi is available, but only in certain areas so let the staff know you want it when you check in or make your reservation. We also took advantage of the area set aside for washing cars and rigs. The laundry rooms have front-loading high efficiency washers and that was nice. There are free coffee and donuts in the office each morning, and the recreation facility is decorated in a cute log cabin/mountain retreat theme. When we checked in we received a coupon good for $2 off our next visit. The park wasn't very full when we were there this time, but the lady in the office said that they are very busy in January, so it's a good idea to make reservations at that time.
12/2007
rating [ 3/10 ]
In reading through past reviews I was amazed that other RVers had given this park much higher ratings. Just because someone spent a lot of money building an RV park doesn't make it a good one. The parking pads are plenty long enough, but way too narrow. Yes, you do have to step into the landscaped flower beds when you get out of your rig! Also, for a class A motorhome with the door located near the front of the rig, you will have to walk back toward the rear, through the flower bed, to get to the picnic table located on a little concrete patio. With a little more thought, the patios could have been placed so that you would step right out onto them like in many other parks. Getting hooked up to the internet was a hassle. First you have to give them a deposit for a modem and then you have to figure out how to make it work. It took us a couple of trips to the office to sort it out and, as in so many places, the desk staff wasn't trained to be very helpful when it came to dealing with internet connection problems. Finally, the $39 rate was too much just for a place to stay the night and I personally don't see this park as a destination resort, given its location so close to the freeway. We'll give this one a pass the next time we are travelling down the interstate.
01/2008
rating [ 10/10 ]
This is one of the best state parks we have ever camped at! There are two campgrounds. Arch Rock, where we stayed, has several spacious sites with water and electric hook-ups that will accommodate the largest RV. Atlatl Rock campground has smaller, but more picturesque sites. A lot of thought has gone into the design of the campgrounds and the layout of their sites. Many are very private. Just about any campsite will give you wonderful views of the dramatic red rock formations and some allow you to nestle right in among them. All of the buildings and picnic structures have been built in such a way as to be as unobtrusive as possible and blend in with the scenery. There is a good Visitor's Center and many scenic drives, walks and hikes to keep you busy. Although this park is only about an hour form Las Vegas it is a world away.
01/2008
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a relatively new park and the facilities are quite nice. It is operated in conjunction with the Best Western Motel and the RV park part is located behind the motel and so is buffered from street noise. We didn't use the shower or bathrooms, but when I looked into one it was spotless. Everything was very clean. The only negative was that we had to trek to the motel lobby every time that we wanted to use the internet and we had a lot of trouble connecting.
12/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
We were only going to stop for the night, but stayed 2 nights because we liked it so much. This is a very well-kept park. There are quite a few permanent residents but it is obvious that they take pride in their park and make up a friendly community. The grounds were very clean and the location is convenient to I-5, but far enough off the freeway to be quiet. The nearby town of Oakland is worth a visit if you like historic towns and antique shopping.
02/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
You really get a lot of bang for your buck at Oregon state parks and this one is no exception. According to the park brochure there are 47 full hook-ups, 119 electrical sites, 191 tent sites, 10 yurts, a group site and a hiker/biker camp. The main draw here is the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area. If you are not fond of ATVs you may not like staying here as you will not be able to get entirely away from the noise, but the park does a good job of enforcing the rules and has a separate loop where ATVs are not allowed. For those who want more quiet activities there are 3 small fresh water lakes and lots of trails to explore. Oregon state parks have "shoulder season" rates and they are a real deal. Our fee of $17 was for a full-hook-up site. We also really appreciate that the park supplies a large garbage disposal area that also has bins for recycling just about anything - aluminum, tin cans, glass, plastic containers and paper.
02/2007
rating [ 6/10 ]
As with another California state park that we stayed at on this trip, we found this park in need of a lot of deferred maintenance. The setting is really nice - lots of big evergreens and views of the ocean from the top of a bluff. Some of the sites are set down in the lower forest, but the best sites are up on the bluff where you can see the ocean and it is not so gloomy in the winter. Be aware that if you are here in the winter you will find that the sites are pretty muddy and soggy. Quite a few people living in the park in make-shift camps. I do have to complement the park hosts though who seemed to be really trying to do the best they could given the limited resources they had.
02/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
This was a welcome discovery for us. We did not want to stay in Quartzite amid all the hoopla and dust and were pleased to find this county park along the Colorado River just a few miles west of the AZ-CA border. The water/electric sites are all crowded together in one area of the park and it was pretty full with snowbirds. We opted for a site in the no hook-ups area and had it pretty much to ourselves. Some of these "dry" sites have access to a water tap and the camp host had no problem with our taking a site where we could connect to one (although she did warn us that most people drink bottled water. We had a nice view of the river and beautiful old shade trees all around us. One caveat - this part of the campground is a little tight to maneuver in, but the sites themselves are spacious. It's the trees that you have to watch out for. They crowd the access road and some have low hanging branches. I'm glad they are leaving them though for in the summer they must provide very welcome shade. We saw lots of birds here and it was quiet and peaceful.
02/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
If you are confused reading the earlier reviews about this campground it is because there are two campgrounds with almost identical names at Big Bend. Rio Grande Village Campground is run by the park service and has no hook-ups. It is a traditional National Park campground. Rio Grande Village RV is run by a concessionaire and has full hook-ups and costs more ($21). I am reviewing the park service campground, which in my opinion is much nicer than the concessionaire campground. We had a site with nice big cottonwood trees around it to give us a bit of shade although in February this wasn't as critical as it would be later in the year. If you are camping in a tent heed the warnings about the javelinas and keep all food locked in the park-provided lockers that are at every campsite. Good advice for everyone actually. There are two areas in the campground and you are only allowed to use generators in one of them so take that into consideratin when picking out a site. There is a very pretty nature trail that starts just opposite campsite 18 and goes through a wetlands area and then up to a bluff for outstanding views of the Rio Grande River and the Mexican village of Boquillas on the opposite shore. We spent three days at Big Bend and wished we could have stayed longer. It is a beautiful park with varied scenery and plenty of birds and animals to see.
02/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
We have used this park several times when traveling down the I-5 corridor, but it is not on my list of favorites. It just may be that we are usually here during the off season and it is almost always raining. Although the big firs and cedars are beautiful, they can make for gloomy campsites. This time we opted for a full hook-up site. These are all out from under the trees in a small clearing and so are a bit brighter and because they are gravelled they are not so soggy. Just be aware that the sites in the trees are prettier and more private. All that said, it is a nice enough park in all other ways and has lots of trails and you can walk across the highway to the Mt. St. Helen's Visitor Center. It makes an OK layover if you are going up or down I-5 and a good base from which to see Mt. St. Helen's which is definitely worth seeing.
02/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
This was the second time that we have stayed at this park and we like it a lot. It is in a nice, quiet location a little ways out of town. I agree with another reviewer who suggested that if you want more privacy to ask for a back-in site at the back of the park on the outside loop. Some people mentioned a slip in maintenance since the city took over ownership, but I can't say that we noticed anything. When we checked in we received a coupon good for 2 nights for the price of 1 valid Oct. 1st to June 15th (excluding holidays) to use on our next off-season visit.
02/2007
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is an expensive, but beautiful park. The sites are large and have a lot of privacy and the landscaping features lots of native plants. This park had been extensively reviewed by others so I won't go into a lot of detail. We would stay here again even though it's pricey.
02/2007
rating [ 4/10 ]
Although this state park is set in a beautiful location on a bluff above the Pacific Ocean it was in need of a lot of attention at the time of our stay. You will not be able to get a big rig into this park. At 32' we were one of the biggest motorhomes there. There were a lot of transients staying in the park in dilapidated trailers and homemade campers. The park host was a young man who looked to be barely out of his teens and did not inspire any confidence in his ability to handle anything more complicated than selling firewood. The wooden picnic tables and food lockers were rotten and falling apart. The whole place seemed to be going down hill fast (perhaps due to a lack of funding) and the fee of $25 for no hook-ups was ridiculous! It's too bad because we usually enjoy are stays at state parks, but we won't be back to this one.
02/2007
rating [ 6/10 ]
Like all RV parks, this one had good things and bad things about it. On the good side it is relatively new and modern and some of the sites have nice views of the dunes. There were several things we didn't like however. The laundry room was small and the machines needed maintenance. There was a sign that warned that if you were going to use both washers at once you needed to start them 5 minutes apart or the drains would overflow. I think that when they are charging you $35 a night they should be able to figure out how to get two washing machines to work at the same time. We were here right after President's Day and they must have been busy that weekend because the garbage dumpsters were overflowing. I feel that a facility should be able to handle the garbage even when it is filled to capacity. Perhaps they just want to save money by having the trash collected as infrequently as possible? We also had to pay an extra $4 to get WiFi so that brought the cost up to $39 for one night's stay. We probably won't be back - it was too expensive for what you get.
02/2007
rating [ 5/10 ]
On the plus side it is a pretty park with a lot of attractions: fishing, hiking, birding, horseback riding,etc. On the minus side it is noisy. The campground is adjacent to heavily used railroad tracks. I clocked a train going by behind our rig about once every 30 minutes. When I say "behind our rig" I mean a distance of about 50'. The only small blessing was that they didn't blow their horns and they kept the speed down. The other thing that I didn't care for is that to get to the park you have to drive through an amazing amount of urban and suburban sprawl. We probably won't use this park again unless we have no other options.
02/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
We really liked this campground. The pull through sites in the hook-up area are quite nice, but the dry sites are even better if you can maneuver into one of them. At the time we were there the road leading to the dry sites, which is dirt, was really rutted and not very negotiable for a big rig. People car camping with a tent and those in truck campers or vans would not have trouble getting to the dry site which are nestled among the big rock formations for which the park is named. The hook-up area is out in the open, but does have nice views of the rocks and surrounding country. A great side trip from here is to Gila cliff Dwellings National Monument. We would definitely stay here again.
02/2007
rating [ 6/10 ]
This park is a little rough around the edges, but the proprietors are super friendly and welcoming. The coffee pot is always on. We were invited to come to the recreation hall to watch the free Sunday night movies, complete with popcorn. We were also given a small bag with promotional items and manufacturers' samples (like one would get at a convention). There are nice homey touches too: you are given a little star sticker and invited to add it to the big map on the wall to show where you are from; completed jig-saw puzzles are mounted on the walls of the laundry room; the family dog and cat are always in evidence. We like these personal touches, but some folks don't care for that kind of thing. If you are traveling with children this would be a good place to stay since it has a playground, a large game room and a pool. It can get quite windy in Carlsbad and since the sites are all gravel it can get quite dusty, but that is a problem all over this part of the country. There appeared to be quite a few long-term residents in the park, but it was reasonable neat and tidy. Not the fanciest place we have ever stayed, but we would use it again. The location is also convenient with a Wal-Mart just a few minutes away and other services nearby.
01/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a nice small park about 60 miles east of Yuma on I-8. If you like to get away from the congestion of big cities and big RV parks, this is the place for you. When we pulled into Yuma on a Friday night without any reservations and there was no room at the inn, we called this park and a very friendly and accommodating fellow answered the phone and promised to save us a spot. The access road to the park is gravel and a little rough, but just go slow and you'll be OK. When we arrived it was getting dark and the manager came out to greet us and personally showed us to our spot, then let us get hooked-up before he came back to collect our fee. He made us feel welcome after a long, tiring day. All of the spaces are gravel, but quite level and have a little desert landscaping around them. It appeared that about half of the sites are seasonal, but were well-maintained. A lady from a neighboring site invited us to the Sunday ice-cream social - it was nice to be included even though we were just passing through. There is a swimming pool for warmer weather. Excellent WiFi reception. The atmosphere is low key and kind of "folksy" - a refreshing change from all the hoopla of the big resort RV parks. Just a nice place to spend the night or come for a week or two to relax.
02/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
It's not so much the campground, which is quite nice, that makes this worth the trip but the surroundings in which the campground is located. The Davis Mountains are beautiful! There is an abundance of wildlife and bird feeding stations in the campground attract a variety of birds for visitors to see. The north half of the park, the Limpia Canyon Primitive Area, has backcountry hiking and primitive tent campsites. The south half of the park is more developed with partial and full hook-up sites. Also nearby are Fort Davis National Historic Site and the University of Texas McDonald Observatory. Don't forget to go take a peek at Indian Lodge, a beautiful hotel in the park that was built in a Spanish style by the CCC in the early 1930s. I only gave the campground a rating of 7 because although it is a good campground it is not the real star here - it is the land itself and I would rate that a 10.
02/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
We had read about this park and wanted to see the spring/swimming pool. I think this park would appeal especially to those who are camping with children as they would get a big kick out of the pool. We were able to get a pull-thru site on the outside of the campground loop which gave us more privacy than those on the inside of the loop where you are pretty close to your neighbors. Besides the swimming pool, there is a small restored wetlands area and the grounds of the park are quite pretty. Accommodations are also available in San Solomon Springs Court which was constructed by the CCC out of adobe bricks made on site in the 1940s. Texas state parks have a rather complicated registration procedure and fee structure. There is an entrance fee as well as a camping fee. We would stay here again if we were in the area, but I don't think we would make it a destination stop.
02/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
While not the newest or the biggest park around we would definitely stay here again. At $28 a night it did seem a little overpriced, but was in line with the going rate at other RV parks in Las Cruces. It is not so much the price (within reason) or the amenities that matters the most to us when we rate a park, but how we are treated by the owners, manager and staff. Upon registering here we were given a free newspaper full of information on sites to see and things to do in the area and the friendly and knowledgeable owners invited us to just let them know if we had any questions about any other local destinations or where to get groceries or whatever. WiFi reception was excellent. Although there were quite a few seasonal or full-time residents in the park, it was overall well-maintained. The owners live right in the park. The park is small and the spaces are a little tight to get into. We had to park our toad cross-wise behind the rig to avoid being out in the road. There are nice mature trees and the park is in a quiet location. The close proximity of the park to the historic old town of Mesilla with its shops, restaurants, and Mexican-style town plaza is also a plus.
01/2007
rating [ 4/10 ]
The ad in our Trailer Life Directory claims that this is "Lordsburg's Finest", but that's not saying much since I don't think there is anywhere else to camp in Lordsburg! True to our experience with KOA campgrounds, this park was overpriced and poorly managed. We were first put in a space that was not long enough to accommodate our 32' rig and its toad without one or the other hanging out into the road. When my husband went back to the office to see about moving to a different space the manager (I use the term loosely) informed him that according to his computer our assigned space was big enough for us. Of course he couldn't be bothered to come out and actually look at the space. After some wrangling and more paperwork he allowed us to move to a different space. When I inquired about the advertised WiFi he told me that it was available only from 7:00pm to 7:00am and if I couldn't get on to bring my laptop to the laundry room! After we got settled in I went to the office to get change for the laundry room and the manager was talking on the phone to a customer. The conversation was not going well -the caller and the manager were having trouble understanding one another and after awhile the manager just hung up on the caller! "Oh, he'll call back" he said! I don't think so. I got my change and went to see what might be available in the ice-cream freezer. There was an assortment of ice-cream bars, popcicles, etc. Unfortunately, none of them could still be described as frozen. The best I can say about this park is that it was clean and relatively quiet.
01/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a large state park right on the outskirts of Tucson - and I mean right on the outskirts. Drive just a mile from the park and you are in the land of strip malls and housing developments. I hope the state has this land locked up tight because it is being surrounded by development. It makes for a rather unsettling approach to the park, but once you are there that is all forgotten and you can pretend you are really out in the wilderness - at least a little. There is a lot to do at this park -hiking, bicycling and birding or just relaxing. The staff at the Visitors Center can provide you with a good handout that describes all the trails. The campground itself is laid out pretty nicely with fairly good privacy between the sites. A previous review mentioned the system used in the Arizona state parks and I agree that it works well. You pay as you come in and they give you a tag to hang on your rig and/or your car and then you just go and pick out the site you like. It's first-come, first-served, but we had no trouble getting a spot mid-week. There are no sewer hook-ups, but there is a dump station.
01/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is a nice state park close to I-10. I was afraid that we would get freeway noise, but although the highway was visible from our site, we really couldn't hear it. The location is at the bottom of Picacho Peak which rises up dramatically from the desert floor. There is a small visitor center with friendly, efficient staff. There are nice trails from which to explore the desert and good bird watching. The campsites are well-spaced out,clean and level. It's a good place to layover if you are traveling I-10. Nice sunsets!
01/2007
rating [ 9/10 ]
One of the most beautiful campgrounds we've ever stayed in. The campsites are set amid huge boulders and many feature a secluded area in which to pitch a tent. All have picnic tables and fire grills. There are no hook-ups and no water is available, so come with full fresh water tanks and empty holding tanks if you plan to be here awhile. Generators are allowed during limited hours. A lot of the sites are fairly small and really more appropriate for tent campers, but there is an adequate supply of spots for motorhomes too. Most of the sites that can accommodate a larger rig are pull-throughs that line the main campground access road. One of these was fine for us when we were there as the campground wasn't even half-full, but it might be a concern during a busy period as you are parked quite close to passing cars. There is an easy hike that leaves from the middle of the campground and provides a nice introduction to the splendors of Joshua Tree National Park.
01/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
I read all the other reviews and most people seem to just love this park. In it's favor I will say that it is very nicely laid out, clean and relatively quiet. The "lake" is man-made, but nice enough. There are, however, some things that we didn't like. How come, for instance, they still can't offer decent cable TV? They have been in operation long enough to have gotten that problem solved by now I would think. I suspect it is a conscious decision on the part of the management. They would rather have you in the casino than in your rig watching TV! And why haven't they got their WiFi working better by now? Why advertise it in large print in the Trailer Life Directory if you can only get it in a few spaces near the office? Same motive I think. We thought we might like to eat in the restaurant, but the atmosphere was way too smokey for us. Even the convenience store smelled like a cigarette factory. One thing to be aware of is that they have different rates depending on what day of the week it is. We came in on a Saturday and had to pay $35 (ouch!) for that night even with our Good Sam discount. The next night the rate dropped to $25, which was much more reasonable. Also, unless you don't mind listening to whatever music the management prefers, don't take a spot too near the pool and spa, where they play music over outdoor speakers all day long.
01/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
Furnace Creek Campground is operated by the National Park Service, not a concessionaire. We have stayed at two other campgrounds in Death Valley (Texas Spring and Mesquite Spring) and like this campground the best. First, there is some shade, albeit of a limited variety. Secondly, it is centrally located within the park and thirdly, it enjoys some nice views of the Panamint and Funeral Mountains which make for good sunset and sunrise watching. Additionally, it is within walking distance of the Visitors Center and the other services of Furnace Creek - store, post office, restaurant, etc. Amenities at the campgrounds in Death Valley are limited, but that's not what you come here for. I based my overall rating more on a comparison to other campgrounds in Death Valley, rather than to private campgrounds or resorts elsewhere. Generators are allowed but restricted to limited hours. There are a few pull-throughs. We had no trouble getting our 32' Class A in here. There are no hook-ups, but there is a dump station and potable water is available. The restrooms have just toilets and sinks, no showers. Reservations can be made at 1-800-365-2267 or reservations.nps.gov.
01/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is an attractive public campground set along the Sacramento River Delta. It is has a large boat ramp and docks for those who like to boat and/or fish. We enjoyed walking along the many trails that meander through the park. There is a dump station available. I don't remember if there were any pull-through sites, but we had no trouble getting our 32' Class A into a back-in spot.
01/2007
rating [ 8/10 ]
We stopped here on our way down I-5 to Death Valley. This is a very pleasant, clean park with friendly, helpful staff. It is easy to access from the freeway, but far enough away from it to be quiet. WiFi connection was good. A nice thing is that they allow you to wash your rig. The town of Red Bluff is also worth a look - good antique stores in the old part of town. We would definitely stay here again.
09/2005
rating [ 8/10 ]
This State Park is set among a beautiful ponderosa pine forest on a peninsula that juts into Payette Lake. Just about any kind of outdoor activity that you might enjoy is available: fishing, swimming, boating, hiking, mountain biking and, in the winter, cross-country skiing. During the summer there are ranger programs. If you want some city activities the town of McCall is just a few miles away and offers good shopping and dining opportunities. The Park is open year round, with limited services in the winter.
09/2005
rating [ 8/10 ]
This park is located at the confluence of the Jefferson, Madison and Gallatin Rivers which form the headwaters of the Missouri River. It is rich in history as Lewis and Clark camped very near here in 1805 with the Corps of Discovery. It is a beautiful, relatively undeveloped park that features outdoor interpretive signs explaining the geological history as well as that of the Native Americans and white settlers who came through this area. There are many scenic hiking trails and a nice day use area. Some of the campsites lie right along the Madison River. My indication of the number of campsites is an estimate - there are not very many. It is open May 1 - September 30 and is not suitable for big rigs.
07/2005
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a delightful State Park in northeastern Washington. The campsites are spread out through a grassy area above the lake and are spaced far enough apart that you don't feel crowded. Our site was a nice pull through with shade - good to have in summer in eastern Washington! The walk-in tent sites looked really nice as they are well dispersed on the grassy slopes above the lake with many of them having direct access to the lake and beautiful views. There is a nice nature trail that winds among the hills and past a little pond and marsh area. The park seems little known and was not very crowded at all. There is reportedly good fishing for rainbow trout in early summer. The park is open April through September.
05/2005
rating [ 8/10 ]
This State Park is on Lake Owyhee, a man-made lake, about 33 miles southwest of Nyssa in Eastern Oregon. The drive from Nyssa to the park is along the Owyhee River which runs through a beautiful canyon and offers many opportunities for wildlife viewing and fishing. The campsites, for the most part, sit on a high shelf above the lake and offer great views of the lake and the surrounding rocky cliffs. Gorgeous sunset views! We stayed at McCormack Campground, but there is also another campground at Indian Creek which we didn't get a chance to see, but which I think only has primitive camp sites. The campground has nice tent sites too and 2 tepees which can be rented. There is a boat ramp for avid anglers. The park was uncrowded and there were lots of wildflowers and many species of birds to see when we were there in mid-May. The road to the park is paved all the way, but is narrow in places with steep drop-offs. There was one big Class A motorhome in the park, but most folks were in campers, smaller 5th wheels or Class C's.
05/2005
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a very nice, small park on the outskirts of Burns. It is an older park, but well maintained by friendly, knowledgable owners. It makes a good base for exploring the Malheur Wildlife Refuge, the Diamond Craters area and Steens Mountain. Although it is located on the highway going out of town, the park is quiet and situated along a small tranquil river. Our site was gravelled and required some levelling, but nothing we couldn't accommodate. There is free coffee in the morning at the office which is stocked with a good supply of paperback books, jig-saw puzzles, some RV supplies and tourist information.
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